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New Trove of Canadian Fossils Expands Knowledge of Cambrian Explosion

KQED Science | February 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Trove of Canadian Fossils Expands Knowledge of Cambrian Explosion

A new trove of soft-body fossils promises to expand the range of time and life-forms available to science as we explore the Cambrian Explosion of a half-billion years ago.

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Don’t Eat the Dirt on Mars: the Pros and Cons of Perchlorate

KQED Science | February 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

Don’t Eat the Dirt on Mars: the Pros and Cons of Perchlorate

To be successful Mars colonists, future astronauts will need to know both the potential hazard and utility of the soil. One unusual compound that has garnered quite a bit of attention is called perchlorate; it has the potential to be both a blessing and a curse for future explorers.

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Could We Find Tomorrow’s Water Supply Under the Ocean?

KQED Science | February 6, 2014 | 3 Comments

Could We Find Tomorrow’s Water Supply Under the Ocean?

We've thought about drilling offshore for oil and gas long before we thought about finding fresh water there. A recent review paper in Nature has brought the topic of offshore fresh groundwater to wider visibility.

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Using Art to Imagine a Restored Bay Delta Watershed

KQED Science | February 3, 2014 | 1 Comment

Using Art to Imagine a Restored Bay Delta Watershed

The San Francisco Bay Delta watershed is enormous. It has also been enormously altered. Volunteer, non-profit and government efforts have all done a great deal to restore the watershed. But according to Derek Hitchcock, an ecologist with The Watershed Project, “Cultural healing is needed before watershed healing.”

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Co-Existing with the Dynamics of California’s Changing Coastline

KQED Science | January 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

Co-Existing with the Dynamics of California’s Changing Coastline

A rising sea makes things only a little worse than what we're used to, or at least what geologists are used to. Geoscientists are ready to help with this foreseeable future.

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The Next New Madrid Earthquake: Busy Being Born, Not Busy Dying

KQED Science | January 23, 2014 | 2 Comments

The Next New Madrid Earthquake: Busy Being Born, Not Busy Dying

For long-term earthquake planning in the Mississippi Valley region, we need to know whether earthquakes are fading away, as some suggest, or not. A new study argues that we're in a "steady as she goes" phase.

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U.S. Ecosystem Research Receives $5 Million Boost from the NSF

KQED Science | January 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

U.S. Ecosystem Research Receives $5 Million Boost from the NSF

Critical Zone Observatories, or CZOs, are designated sites around the world where scientists study the crucial environmental interactions that occur on the Earth's surface. This new frontier in research can lead to further insights on sustainable civilization.

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3 of the World’s Best Scientific Aircraft Team Up for Climate Science Research

KQED Science | January 9, 2014 | 5 Comments

3 of the World’s Best Scientific Aircraft Team Up for Climate Science Research

A tag-team of all-star research aircraft, including a robot, set out next week on a quest to explore a great atmospheric engine in the West Pacific with a powerful influence on global climate.

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Rethinking Normal: An Exploratorium Exhibit Takes on Mental Health

KQED Science | January 8, 2014 | 0 Comments

Rethinking Normal: An Exploratorium Exhibit Takes on Mental Health

As scientists struggle to find better ways to diagnose and treat mental disorders, an Exploratorium exhibition, "The Changing Face of What Is Normal," experiments with a new way to encourage people to think about what is normal.

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Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

KQED Science | January 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Stunning Fish Skeletons Serve Science and Art

Cleared and stained skeletons are strikingly beautiful. But not many people outside the lab would ever know it—until now. "Cleared" is an exhibit of stained fish skeletons currently on display at the Seattle Aquarium, prepared and photographed by Adam P. Summers. Recently, Summers and his colleagues used a cleared and stained manta ray to discover how these curiously flat fish filter food out of the water.

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Seismology Semantics: Researchers Successfully ‘Anticipate’ Costa Rican Earthquake

KQED Science | January 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Seismology Semantics: Researchers Successfully ‘Anticipate’ Costa Rican Earthquake

Coastal subsidence and precision GPS data helped scientists "anticipate" a major earthquake in Coast Rica, placing us one small step closer to earthquake prediction.

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Endangered Coho Salmon Return to Marin to Spawn

KQED Science | December 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Endangered Coho Salmon Return to Marin to Spawn

Watching wild salmon swimming upstream isn’t just for for people with a television. This is the time of year for people in the San Francisco Bay Area to leave their couches and watch the endangered coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) spawn in Marin! There are three main viewing sites in Marin, although the Leo T. Cronin […]

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The 2013 Geological Holiday Quiz

KQED Science | December 26, 2013 | 0 Comments

The 2013 Geological Holiday Quiz

The third in this challenging set of questions, most of them related to Bay Area geology: rocks, resources and activity. Answers are now posted.

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Geological BFF’s: Mud Microbes Require Rare Earth Metals to Thrive

KQED Science | December 19, 2013 | 0 Comments

Geological BFF’s: Mud Microbes Require Rare Earth Metals to Thrive

The obscure rare-earth metals turn out to be unexpectedly essential to life in hot volcanic mud--and probably elsewhere.

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Changes in Earth’s Magnetic Field Lead to Renamed Oakland Airport Runways

KQED Science | December 12, 2013 | 15 Comments

Changes in Earth’s Magnetic Field Lead to Renamed Oakland Airport Runways

A geological change of glacial speed finally made itself felt in a way the civil authorities had to acknowledge.

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Four Bay Area Cities Selected as Future Models of Resilience

KQED Science | December 5, 2013 | 0 Comments

Four Bay Area Cities Selected as Future Models of Resilience

A $100 million effort to push the world's cities toward better disaster resistance is making a test case with a "gang of four" Resilient Cities: Alameda, Berkeley, Oakland and San Francisco.

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Here’s Some Sweet Research: Increased Chocolate Consumption Linked to Less Body Fat

KQED Science | December 3, 2013 | 0 Comments

Here’s Some Sweet Research: Increased Chocolate Consumption Linked to Less Body Fat

‘Tis the season to indulge—and perhaps make up for it at New Year’s with a resolution to exercise more. But what if all that chocolate doesn’t require penitence? A new paper has linked chocolate consumption to reduced “fatness” in European teens. This confirms and extends a recent study from UCSD that found a similar link in Californian adults.

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Arctic Algae Offer New Insights on Prehistoric Climate Data

KQED Science | November 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Arctic Algae Offer New Insights on Prehistoric Climate Data

The short list of climate proxy species gains a new member in the critical Arctic Ocean region, a crusty red alga named Clathromorphum compactum.

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