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Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

KQED Science | December 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

A new set of rock dates have pushed volcanism back into the debate over the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

A new book about marine invertebrates celebrates the sumptuous beauty of our lesser-known cousins.

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L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

KQED Science | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

The just-released seismic resiliency plan for Los Angeles goes beyond just saving lives; it hopes to ensure that the nation's second-largest city will still work after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake.

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Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

KQED Science | December 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

Thanks to a meteorite collected in 1879, we have finally given a name to the most abundant mineral in Earth. Here's why it took so long to christen this stuff.

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Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

The cutting edge in earthquake research is mapping our most important faults in three-dimensional detail. A new paper finds some key hidden links in the Bay Area's fault system.

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Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 5 Comments

Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

Migratory monarch butterfly populations have fallen into a tailspin in recent years. Scientists fear that in a classic case of good intentions gone awry, efforts to help the beleaguered butterflies may be inadvertently making matters worse by changing their behavior.

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Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 1 Comment

Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

If you want to go to Mars but can’t quite afford the hundreds of billions of dollars for a ticket, there is another solution: consider instead a trip to the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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Helix Science Center in Los Altos Will Close Its Doors at the End of November

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Helix Science Center in Los Altos Will Close Its Doors at the End of November

Helix, a Los Altos "community science center" run by the Exploratorium, will close its doors on November 30. The 5,000-square-foot space brought hands-on science exhibits, a classroom with ever-changing activities and a museum gift shop to downtown Los Altos.

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What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

KQED Science | November 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

When a court convicted earthquake scientists of manslaughter, seismologists everywhere feared the worst for their own efforts at informing the public. After the convictions were overturned on appeal this week, experts, journalists and the general public can consider the wider lessons learned.

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With Residential Retrofit Scheme, Oakland Enters Next Phase of Quakeproofing

KQED Science | October 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

With Residential Retrofit Scheme, Oakland Enters Next Phase of Quakeproofing

Oakland gains character as well as affordable housing from its stock of small and mid-sized apartment buildings. A retrofit plan is being prepared to strengthen this crucial part of the city's fabric against earthquake damage.

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‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 1 Comment

‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

A California woman recently became the first person in the West to receive a new type of bionic eye, an implant that will help her see for the first time in nearly three decades.

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South Napa Quake Offers Key Test for Real-Time GPS Detection

KQED Science | October 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

South Napa Quake Offers Key Test for Real-Time GPS Detection

The familiar GPS system is being enlisted to help improve earthquake shaking alerts; an experimental system is now operating at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory.

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Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

KQED Science | October 20, 2014 | 1 Comment

Bay Area Scientists Artfully Present Their Research in Oakland Exhibit

“Experimental Space” is the latest show at Oakland art gallery Aggregate Space, consisting of images and videos created by scientists in the course of their research.

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New Paper Outlines Updated Look on San Andreas Fault System

KQED Science | October 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

New Paper Outlines Updated Look on San Andreas Fault System

A new study from our local earthquake experts has put new and clearer numbers on the risk of large earthquakes in the Bay Area's future--evidence of new progress in this slow process of enlightenment.

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Join a Series of Geological Treasure Hunts With Earth Science Week 2014

KQED Science | October 9, 2014 | 1 Comment

Join a Series of Geological Treasure Hunts With Earth Science Week 2014

The annual open-ended celebration of geology and its related sciences takes place all this coming week. See what's happening and where to take part.

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Computer-Generated Molecular Models Promise Greener Concrete

KQED Science | October 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Computer-Generated Molecular Models Promise Greener Concrete

More precisely targeted cement would use less calcium and use less energy to create it. A study at MIT exploring the molecular structure of cement promises substantial energy and greenhouse-gas savings in this crucial technology.

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Two New Studies Underline How Methane Matters to Global Carbon Cycle

KQED Science | September 25, 2014 | 1 Comment

Two New Studies Underline How Methane Matters to Global Carbon Cycle

Natural gas is often called a "bridge fuel" that will help ease us off of carbon-based energy. But a study suggests that without policies to push us toward renewables and away from fossil fuels, natural gas will still leave the sky as a waste dump.

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USGS Releases a New Mapping Tool to Assist Tsunami Shelter Development

KQED Science | September 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

USGS Releases a New Mapping Tool to Assist Tsunami Shelter Development

It may happen just once in your lifetime: a large tsunami is coming, big enough to make you run for your life. Where do you go? USGS has released a new tool to help planners plot out shelters in West Coast communities and other tsunami-hazard zones.

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Dancing with Atoms: Innovative Art Advances Computing and Chemistry

KQED Science | September 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

Dancing with Atoms: Innovative Art Advances Computing and Chemistry

We humans are naturally enchanted by life at scales smaller than our own. An imaginative art installation can draw you into the sub-microscopic realm with the compelling immersion of a video game.

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California’s Earthquake Early Warning System Is Ready to Get Started

KQED Science | September 11, 2014 | 1 Comment

California’s Earthquake Early Warning System Is Ready to Get Started

The Third International Conference on Earthquake Early Warning, held in Berkeley last week, was a revealing glimpse of our future, in which we'll get precious seconds of notice before earthquake shaking strikes our lives and buildings.

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