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The ‘Tahoe Tsunami’: New Study Envisions Early Geologic Event

KQED Science | July 31, 2014 | 0 Comments

The ‘Tahoe Tsunami’: New Study Envisions Early Geologic Event

A new paper marshals evidence detailing the catastrophic landslide and mega-tsunami that struck Lake Tahoe during the late Pleistocene.

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Communicating Science Through an Artistic Lens at Stanford

KQED Science | July 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

Communicating Science Through an Artistic Lens at Stanford

Stanford scientist Sue McConnell will receive $1 million over the next five years to sustain a program that teaches biology seniors to communicate science to the public through art.

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Everything You Know about Cholesterol Is Probably Wrong

KQED Science | July 9, 2014 | 6 Comments

Everything You Know about Cholesterol Is Probably Wrong

Most of us have heard about good cholesterol and bad cholesterol. But it's not the cholesterol that causes harm, it's the particles that carry it. And routine blood tests don't measure them.

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Oklahoma Study Offers Better Insight into Industrial Earthquakes

KQED Science | July 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Oklahoma Study Offers Better Insight into Industrial Earthquakes

A new study adds strong evidence that deep-injection wells can occasionally nudge a fault into activity. The key is figuring out how it happens, then learning to avoid whatever is making it happen.

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Studying Exoplanets: What A Thousand Points of Light Might Reveal About Earth

KQED Science | June 26, 2014 | 0 Comments

Studying Exoplanets: What A Thousand Points of Light Might Reveal About Earth

As a flood of new exoplanets swim into our ken, we have ways of turning these pixel-size steams of data into insights about our own planet.

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New Evidence of Earth’s Deep Water Cycle Reveals A Virtual Buried Ocean

KQED Science | June 12, 2014 | 1 Comment

New Evidence of Earth’s Deep Water Cycle Reveals A Virtual Buried Ocean

New evidence from high-pressure experiments and earthquake waves suggests the presence of water-rich melt at the base of the upper mantle, far deeper than previous estimates.

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Famous Sunset Paintings Reflect Key Air Pollution Events From the Past

KQED Science | June 3, 2014 | 0 Comments

Famous Sunset Paintings Reflect Key Air Pollution Events From the Past

Data about volcanic eruptions and industrial pollution are encoded in great works of art.

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Plastic Substance Created by Pollution Yields a New Word: Plastiglomerate

KQED Science | May 29, 2014 | 0 Comments

Plastic Substance Created by Pollution Yields a New Word: Plastiglomerate

When future geologists, whatever species they may be, look for our signs in the fossil record of the future, it may be this newly described amalgam of plastic and sediment.

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Progress in Earthquake Forecasts May Come from Studying Foreshocks

KQED Science | May 15, 2014 | 0 Comments

Progress in Earthquake Forecasts May Come from Studying Foreshocks

Recent cutting-edge techniques are opening a new approach for earthquake forecasts by matching foreshocks -- small quakes occurring on the same stretch of fault that subsequently fails in the large mainshock -- to changes on the seafloor.

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An Unusual Stanford Art Exhibit Draws Upon Disease for Inspiration

KQED Science | May 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

An Unusual Stanford Art Exhibit Draws Upon Disease for Inspiration

Imagine entering an art museum, only to recognize a disease you've struggled with. A variety of maladies are featured in the exhibit “Inside Rodin’s Hands: Art, Technology, and Surgery at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center.

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NOAA Expedition Finds Asphalt Volcanic ‘Tar Lilies’ in Gulf of Mexico

KQED Science | May 1, 2014 | 0 Comments

NOAA Expedition Finds Asphalt Volcanic ‘Tar Lilies’ in Gulf of Mexico

A research expedition in the Gulf of Mexico has stumbled on a field of beautiful natural sculptures made of asphalt on the sea floor.

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Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

KQED Science | April 17, 2014 | 2 Comments

Biologists’ Paradox: Killing and Collecting Rare Creatures to Prove They’re Not Extinct

A group of biologists asks their peers to start documenting newly discovered and "rediscovered" species by non-destructive techniques instead of killing a specimen to bring home.

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New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

KQED Science | April 10, 2014 | 1 Comment

New Stanford Study Examines Geologic Impact of a Massive Asteroid Collision on Ancient Earth

A new paper attempts to describe a realistic picture of the unimaginable: a colossal cosmic impact that left a crater 500 kilometers across on the ancient Earth.

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World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

KQED Science | April 8, 2014 | 2 Comments

World’s Largest “Tentacles” Exhibit at Monterey Bay Aquarium Will Cultivate Its Own Cephalopods

The Monterey Bay Aquarium's new exhibit will be the world’s largest, most diverse display of octopuses, squid and cuttlefish. To pull it off, aquarists are coaxing reproduction from the most reluctant critters.

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Study Reveals New Suspect in the ‘Great Dying’ Mass Extinction Murder Mystery

KQED Science | April 3, 2014 | 4 Comments

Study Reveals New Suspect in the ‘Great Dying’ Mass Extinction Murder Mystery

The latest microbial hypothesis published in a recent paper addresses the ongoing drama of the "Great Dying", a monstrously deadly event that occurred about 250 million years ago and drove some 90 percent of the world's species to extinction.

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50 Years Ago, Alaskan Earthquake Was Key Event for Earth Science

KQED Science | March 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

50 Years Ago, Alaskan Earthquake Was Key Event for Earth Science

50 years ago today, the Good Friday earthquake in Alaska sent shockwaves through earth science itself.

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Woolly Mammoth Fossils Raise Red Flags on the Road to Extinction

KQED Science | March 25, 2014 | 0 Comments

Woolly Mammoth Fossils Raise Red Flags on the Road to Extinction

A surprising discovery in woolly mammoth fossils recovered from the North Sea off the coast of the Netherlands suggests that inbreeding and harsh conditions plagued the ice age giants near the end of their reign on Earth.

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Digging Up New Info on Old Earthquakes in the Santa Cruz Mountains

KQED Science | March 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Digging Up New Info on Old Earthquakes in the Santa Cruz Mountains

New research has mapped 19th-century earthquake ruptures along the San Andreas Fault in a study that combines geologic and human records.

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Newly Unveiled Porpoise Fossil Has “Jay Leno-Esque” Proportions

KQED Science | March 13, 2014 | 2 Comments

Newly Unveiled Porpoise Fossil Has “Jay Leno-Esque” Proportions

A porpoise fossil has been unveiled as a unique mammal that skimmed the seafloor with its sensitive, protruding lower jaw.

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Martian Meteorites Traced to Their Source: Mojave Crater

KQED Science | March 6, 2014 | 0 Comments

Martian Meteorites Traced to Their Source: Mojave Crater

Experts have tracked a group of rare meteorites back to a single source on Mars—the crater Mojave near the red planet's equator.

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