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The Greenhouse Effect Is Truly at Work, Observations Show

KQED Science | February 27, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Greenhouse Effect Is Truly at Work, Observations Show

A long record of atmospheric observations has put an "official" stamp on the foundation of climate-change science: the greenhouse effect really works the way we've always said it does.

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Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

KQED Science | February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments

Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

Scientists must play catch-up to industry as we figure out ways to use the deep underground without triggering earthquakes.

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New Study: Global Warming Will Bring Megadroughts to the West

KQED Science | February 12, 2015 | 6 Comments

New Study: Global Warming Will Bring Megadroughts to the West

Our best climate models, combined with our best climate records, foresee at least a century of profound drought in the Midwest and Southwest.

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Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

KQED Science | February 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

In the Internet age, many scientists are questioning the traditional publishing model. As we flounder through the digital revolution, it's intriguing to look back at the print revolution of the early Renaissance, which created comparable social and scientific upheaval.

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Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

KQED Science | February 6, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

The background noise of the deep Earth resembles the random behavior of the sea surface. But advanced techniques can extract robust data from these whispers of information and help save marine life.

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The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

KQED Science | January 29, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

The large asteroid Vesta has added flows of material rich in water to its bag of tricks. It's just one more way this small world acts like a proper planet.

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When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers

KQED Science | January 22, 2015 | 0 Comments

When Finding Faults, Geologists Must Sometimes Become Ditch-Diggers

For geologists, even with the advent of modern technology, there are instances when older methods are more effective; picks and shovels are sometimes the best complementary tools available for trenching studies.

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New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise

KQED Science | January 15, 2015 | 0 Comments

New Climate Research Suggests Acceleration of Sea Level Rise

A reassessment of historical data suggests that compared to previous estimates, the world's sea level rose more slowly during the 20th century—and is rising faster now.

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New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

KQED Science | January 8, 2015 | 1 Comment

New Soil Erosion Study May Help Sustainable Farming Practices

A new way of measuring soil erosion in the geologically recent past, before modern civilization, may help put sustainable agriculture on a firmer footing.

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Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

KQED Science | December 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Dinosaur Extinction: New Research Favors Volcanism as Cause

A new set of rock dates have pushed volcanism back into the debate over the extinction of the dinosaurs.

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Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

KQED Science | December 16, 2014 | 1 Comment

Spineless: New Photography Collection Celebrates Our Undersea Cousins

A new book about marine invertebrates celebrates the sumptuous beauty of our lesser-known cousins.

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L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

KQED Science | December 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

L.A.’s “Resilience By Design” Report Lays Out Ambitious Earthquake Infrastructure Plan

The just-released seismic resiliency plan for Los Angeles goes beyond just saving lives; it hopes to ensure that the nation's second-largest city will still work after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake.

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Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

KQED Science | December 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

Earth’s Most Common Mineral is Bagged and Tagged: Meet Bridgmanite

Thanks to a meteorite collected in 1879, we have finally given a name to the most abundant mineral in Earth. Here's why it took so long to christen this stuff.

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Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

KQED Science | November 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

Using 3D Visualization, Geologists Explore the Complex Areas Where Faults Join and Split

The cutting edge in earthquake research is mapping our most important faults in three-dimensional detail. A new paper finds some key hidden links in the Bay Area's fault system.

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Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 5 Comments

Efforts to Restore Monarch Butterflies’ Milkweed Habitats May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

Migratory monarch butterfly populations have fallen into a tailspin in recent years. Scientists fear that in a classic case of good intentions gone awry, efforts to help the beleaguered butterflies may be inadvertently making matters worse by changing their behavior.

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Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

KQED Science | November 19, 2014 | 1 Comment

Want to Go to Mars? A Cheaper Alternative Resides in Chile’s Atacama Desert

If you want to go to Mars but can’t quite afford the hundreds of billions of dollars for a ticket, there is another solution: consider instead a trip to the Atacama Desert in Chile.

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Helix Science Center in Los Altos Will Close Its Doors at the End of November

KQED Science | November 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

Helix Science Center in Los Altos Will Close Its Doors at the End of November

Helix, a Los Altos "community science center" run by the Exploratorium, will close its doors on November 30. The 5,000-square-foot space brought hands-on science exhibits, a classroom with ever-changing activities and a museum gift shop to downtown Los Altos.

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What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

KQED Science | November 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

What Can We Learn from the Italian Earthquake Trial?

When a court convicted earthquake scientists of manslaughter, seismologists everywhere feared the worst for their own efforts at informing the public. After the convictions were overturned on appeal this week, experts, journalists and the general public can consider the wider lessons learned.

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With Residential Retrofit Scheme, Oakland Enters Next Phase of Quakeproofing

KQED Science | October 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

With Residential Retrofit Scheme, Oakland Enters Next Phase of Quakeproofing

Oakland gains character as well as affordable housing from its stock of small and mid-sized apartment buildings. A retrofit plan is being prepared to strengthen this crucial part of the city's fabric against earthquake damage.

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‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

KQED Science | October 27, 2014 | 1 Comment

‘Bionic Eye’ Allows Some Blind People to See Light

A California woman recently became the first person in the West to receive a new type of bionic eye, an implant that will help her see for the first time in nearly three decades.

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