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Four Days in May: Mount Lassen Erupted 100 Years Ago

KQED Science | May 22, 2015 | 0 Comments

Four Days in May: Mount Lassen Erupted 100 Years Ago

Mount Lassen awoke in a brief series of eruptions between 1914 and 1917. This week marks the centennial of Lassen's sensational eruption in a mushrooming column of ash seen as far away as Eureka and Sacramento.

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The Biggest Waves in the World Yield Their Secrets

KQED Science | May 14, 2015 | 2 Comments

The Biggest Waves in the World Yield Their Secrets

Intensive research has laid bare the workings of gigantic "internal waves" that roil the deep seas. The results will advance climate models and make a wide range of marine activities more reliable.

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Pollen Grains Have Newfound Role: Seeding Rain Clouds

KQED Science | May 7, 2015 | 0 Comments

Pollen Grains Have Newfound Role: Seeding Rain Clouds

Maybe that old song ought to say that April flowers bring May showers. A new study shows that pollen grains break up into huge numbers of tiny pieces that are active in triggering cloud formation.

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Fish Help Build Coral-Reef Islands

KQED Science | May 1, 2015 | 1 Comment

Fish Help Build Coral-Reef Islands

A research project in the Indian Ocean shows that coral-crunching fish are good not just for the coral reef habitat--they're actually crucial for maintaining dry land there.

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Why Poop-Eating Vampire Squid Make Patient Parents

KQED Science | April 28, 2015 | 0 Comments

Why Poop-Eating Vampire Squid Make Patient Parents

Squid and octopuses are famous for their "live fast, die young" strategy, but scientists have just discovered a striking exception: the bizarre species known as vampire squid.

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Stegosaurus, Male or Female? The Answer Is in the Plates

KQED Science | April 23, 2015 | 1 Comment

Stegosaurus, Male or Female? The Answer Is in the Plates

A young paleontologist has figured out how to tell male and female stegosaurs apart from the rows of plates upon their backs.

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Fossil Study Detects Another Mass Extinction in the Deep Past

KQED Science | April 16, 2015 | 1 Comment

Fossil Study Detects Another Mass Extinction in the Deep Past

A new study of fossils on an island in the Arctic Ocean show a major episode of extinction that qualifies as a new "great dying."

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The Great 1815 Tambora Eruption: What if This Volcano Blew Today?

KQED Science | April 9, 2015 | 1 Comment

The Great 1815 Tambora Eruption: What if This Volcano Blew Today?

Tambora brought the world a taste of apocalypse 200 years ago. Today we have better tools to monitor volcanoes like it, but the next eruption of its size will still challenge civilization.

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The Anthropocene: An Epoch Mistake?

KQED Science | April 2, 2015 | 2 Comments

The Anthropocene: An Epoch Mistake?

The "Anthropocene," a geology-style name for the present human-dominated era of Earth history, has gotten lots of exposure. But geologists themselves have mixed feelings about actually using it.

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Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

KQED Science | March 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

Tsunami Preparedness Week: Building a Network of Awareness

Tsunamis are a worldwide menace with specific local threats. It pays to learn your local situation and keep the knowledge fresh in your community.

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After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science

KQED Science | March 19, 2015 | 1 Comment

After an Earthquake, Use Your Phone Camera – For Science

Large earthquakes are in our future. When one strikes, there are ways you can help scientists study the event using your phone.

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South American Peaks Contain 2000-Year Record of Lead in the Air

KQED Science | March 12, 2015 | 0 Comments

South American Peaks Contain 2000-Year Record of Lead in the Air

New data from the ancient ice of a tropical glacier shows that lead in gasoline tainted the Earth with the toxic metal far more than any other source, past or present, human or natural.

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Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

KQED Science | March 5, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Discover Natural Glass Created by Volcanoes and Lightning

Geologists are familiar with something most of us have never seen—spherules, or microscopic balls of natural glass that hide in sediments all over the world. A new study reports a previously unknown kind of spherule that’s forged during volcanic eruptions as lightning lashes roiling clouds of hot ash.

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Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

KQED Science | March 3, 2015 | 0 Comments

Vivid New Seadragon Found Hiding in a Museum

Science has just introduced the first new seadragon species in 150 years, and the first new ichthyosaur species in 130 years. The coincidence illustrates the value of museum collections.

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The Greenhouse Effect Is Truly at Work, Observations Show

KQED Science | February 27, 2015 | 1 Comment

The Greenhouse Effect Is Truly at Work, Observations Show

A long record of atmospheric observations has put an "official" stamp on the foundation of climate-change science: the greenhouse effect really works the way we've always said it does.

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Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

KQED Science | February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments

Experts Recommend How to Deal With Artificial Earthquakes

Scientists must play catch-up to industry as we figure out ways to use the deep underground without triggering earthquakes.

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New Study: Global Warming Will Bring Megadroughts to the West

KQED Science | February 12, 2015 | 6 Comments

New Study: Global Warming Will Bring Megadroughts to the West

Our best climate models, combined with our best climate records, foresee at least a century of profound drought in the Midwest and Southwest.

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Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

KQED Science | February 8, 2015 | 0 Comments

Lessons for the Digital Age From a 500-Year-Old Publishing Revolution

In the Internet age, many scientists are questioning the traditional publishing model. As we flounder through the digital revolution, it's intriguing to look back at the print revolution of the early Renaissance, which created comparable social and scientific upheaval.

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Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

KQED Science | February 6, 2015 | 0 Comments

Scientists Tune in to the Earth’s Ambient Hum

The background noise of the deep Earth resembles the random behavior of the sea surface. But advanced techniques can extract robust data from these whispers of information and help save marine life.

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The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

KQED Science | January 29, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Supposedly Dry Little World of the Asteroid Vesta Reveals Signs of Water

The large asteroid Vesta has added flows of material rich in water to its bag of tricks. It's just one more way this small world acts like a proper planet.

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