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Love’s For the Birds: Global Great Backyard Bird Count Begins Today

KQED Science | February 14, 2014 | 0 Comments

Love’s For the Birds: Global Great Backyard Bird Count Begins Today

Citizen scientists are helping to track bird species right in their own backyards. Sharol Nelson-Embry of the East Bay Regional Parks District explains how to get in on the largest global bird count this weekend.

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The Mystery of the Missing Monarch Butterflies

KQED Science | January 17, 2014 | 4 Comments

The Mystery of the Missing Monarch Butterflies

Monarch butterfly populations are declining across North America and scientists are concerned. Why are Ardenwood Historic Farm's monarchs missing and where might they have gone?

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Busy Martinez Beavers Are Still Hard at Work in the Wintertime

KQED Science | December 20, 2013 | 3 Comments

Busy Martinez Beavers Are Still Hard at Work in the Wintertime

The city of Martinez turned its creek flooding problem into a downtown asset and gained some famous beavers in the process. Learn how beavers benefit the creek ecosystem and where you can see them at the Martinez Regional Shoreline.

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River Otters Are Thriving All Over the Bay Area

KQED Science | December 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

River Otters Are Thriving All Over the Bay Area

These charismatic critters draw a lot of attention and are thriving in local creeks, lakes and estuaries.The River Otter Ecology Project is working on the first-ever population assessment of these animals throughout the Bay Area.

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Comet ISON’s Solar-Coaster Ride is Heating Up

KQED Science | November 15, 2013 | 1 Comment

Comet ISON’s Solar-Coaster Ride is Heating Up

There's been a great deal of anticipation surrounding Comet ISON—and a great deal of debate about whether it will become a Comet of the Century, or fizzle out like so many other comets of the century have in the past. ISON is now visible in binoculars, which may bode well for a good sky show in the coming weeks.

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The Physics and Sounds of Seismicity, or Earthquake “Music”

KQED Science | November 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Physics and Sounds of Seismicity, or Earthquake “Music”

Listening to the sped-up vibrations of earthquakes offers a tantalizing glimpse of the deep physics behind seismicity as well as everyday sounds.

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Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

KQED Science | November 12, 2013 | 0 Comments

Creepy Cat Eyes Inspire Road Markers (And Other Unexpectedly Interesting Inventions)

Nature's inventiveness often inspires human innovation, as in the well-known case of Velcro. Learn about other inventions featured in "Hidden Heroes: The Genius of Everyday Things," an exhibit currently on display at the San Jose Museum of Art.

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Where Should We Look for the World’s Oldest Ice?

KQED Science | November 7, 2013 | 0 Comments

Where Should We Look for the World’s Oldest Ice?

Ancient ice is an important source of information about global climates of the past. Although the ice itself is a valuable record, the real prize is the air bubbles preserved in it, some that could be as much as 1.5 million years old.

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The Baylands Nature Preserve: A Winter Birder’s Wonderland

KQED Science | November 6, 2013 | 0 Comments

The Baylands Nature Preserve: A Winter Birder’s Wonderland

Described by bird watchers as the go-to place for the "best birding on the bay," the Palo Alto Baylands Nature Preserve is a feather-filled oasis during winter. This is the time that waterfowl migrate through the Pacific Flyway and settle along the California coast for the season.

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The Controversy Over Calcium Supplements

KQED Science | November 5, 2013 | 4 Comments

The Controversy Over Calcium Supplements

To help prevent osteoporosis, the use of calcium supplements is very common. But recent research studies question whether these calcium supplements are effective or safe.

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Poor Understanding of Genetics Can Lead to Separated Families

KQED Science | November 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Poor Understanding of Genetics Can Lead to Separated Families

Parents can and do have children who look very different from themselves, but lack of understanding of genetics have led to authorities taking children away from them.

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A New “Golden Spike” Monument in Colorado Marks Geologic Time

KQED Science | October 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

A New “Golden Spike” Monument in Colorado Marks Geologic Time

Slowly and painstakingly, geologists are turning the imaginary time scale of Earth's deep history into exact boundaries marked on the ground with metal disks.

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Farming for Cranes: Can Agriculture Save an Ancient Migration?

KQED Science | October 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Farming for Cranes: Can Agriculture Save an Ancient Migration?

Every September, the majestic sandhill crane migrates by the thousands from their breeding grounds as far north as British Columbia to the San Joaquin Valley Delta to fatten up for the next breeding season. Their long-term survival depends on innovative collaborations between conservation biologists and farmers to manage agricultural land as high-quality habitat.

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What’s the State of the San Francisco Estuary?

KQED Science | October 25, 2013 | 0 Comments

What’s the State of the San Francisco Estuary?

The 11th biennial "State of the Estuary" conference is bringing scientists, researchers and resource managers together to share their latest projects and findings next week.

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Forecasting the Risk of Earthquake-Related Landslides

KQED Science | October 24, 2013 | 0 Comments

Forecasting the Risk of Earthquake-Related Landslides

A newly published study from the University of Washington demonstrates how we can forecast landslides that will follow a major earthquake in the Bay Area.

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Controversial Genetic Engineering Technique Could Prevent Fatal Illnesses in Children

KQED Science | October 21, 2013 | 0 Comments

Controversial Genetic Engineering Technique Could Prevent Fatal Illnesses in Children

If scientists are allowed to perform a simple genetic engineering procedure, they will be able to offer a reprieve to a small group of women who are condemned to pass certain fatal genetic diseases to each and every one of their children.

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Comet ISON: Celestial Popcorn That’s Ready to Pop?

KQED Science | October 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

Comet ISON: Celestial Popcorn That’s Ready to Pop?

Maybe a week before it passes closest to the sun, the dark side of Comet ISON is expected to begin turning into the sunlight. The sudden exposure to the intense radiation could cause a strong outburst of gases into the coma--like a celestial popcorn kernel suddenly bursting.

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24 Years Later, The Legacy of Loma Prieta Lives On

KQED Science | October 17, 2013 | 1 Comment

24 Years Later, The Legacy of Loma Prieta Lives On

Nature shows almost no signs of the Loma Prieta earthquake 24 years later. But the human landscape still carries scars that should remind us to practice continual preparedness.

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Infections During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk

KQED Science | October 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Infections During Pregnancy May Increase Autism Risk

Research at UC Davis identifies a new biological mechanism that links maternal infections during pregnancy to increased risk of having a child with a neurodevelopmental disorder like autism.

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California’s Tarantulas Are on the Move During Mating Season

KQED Science | October 11, 2013 | 0 Comments

California’s Tarantulas Are on the Move During Mating Season

Male California tarantulas are now roaming through the Bay Area looking for love. Find out more about where you can see them, what they're doing and what dangers they face from naturalist Sharol Nelson-Embry.

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