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NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft: A Decade of Discovery at Saturn

KQED Science | July 11, 2014 | 0 Comments

NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft: A Decade of Discovery at Saturn

A decade ago, NASA's Cassini spacecraft, the largest and most complex robotic probe yet built, arrived in the Saturn system to begin a marathon exploration of the gas giant, its famous and awe-inspiring rings and what has turned out to be a collection of some of the most eye-opening moons in the solar system.

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Newly Discovered Object in Space May Signal the Presence of Two Distant Worlds

KQED Science | June 27, 2014 | 0 Comments

Newly Discovered Object in Space May Signal the Presence of Two Distant Worlds

Will the generation that is coming into the world today know more than eight, more than nine, solar planets? Some recent observations make this prospect sound like a strong possibility.

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Kepler 10c: An Unexpected Heavyweight Earth

KQED Science | June 13, 2014 | 0 Comments

Kepler 10c: An Unexpected Heavyweight Earth

How big can an Earth-like planet be? Astronomers thought they had a pretty good handle on this question but have just been given a fresh example of how nature never ceases to outpace our imaginations and show us something unexpected.

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From 63 Light Years Away, An Exoplanet is Ready for Its Closeup

KQED Science | May 30, 2014 | 0 Comments

From 63 Light Years Away, An Exoplanet is Ready for Its Closeup

Recently, a major milestone in space exploration was reached: a planet was captured in a picture! The big deal is that the planet captured in this shot, a gas giant planet named Beta Pictoris b, is 63 light years away--over 100,000 times farther away than even Pluto.

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Major Solar Storm Narrowly Misses Earth

KQED Science | May 16, 2014 | 0 Comments

Major Solar Storm Narrowly Misses Earth

Two years ago, a solar coronal mass ejection of possibly the greatest recorded strength in history blasted by Earth's orbit. Had it impacted Earth's protective magnetic field, we could have experienced major disruptions in communication, brilliant aurora displays at tropical latitudes, damage to orbital satellites and possibly even major power blackouts.

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Citing Budget Concerns, NASA Defends Long-Term Plan To Reach Mars in 20 Years

KQED Science | May 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

Citing Budget Concerns, NASA Defends Long-Term Plan To Reach Mars in 20 Years

Recently, NASA administrator Charles Bolden rephrased the "Moon, Mars and Beyond" mission plan to better align the steps toward Mars with budgetary realities and to balance human space programs with more cost-effective robotic missions.

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NASA’s Cassini Divines Hidden Waters of Saturn’s Moon Enceladus

KQED Science | April 18, 2014 | 0 Comments

NASA’s Cassini Divines Hidden Waters of Saturn’s Moon Enceladus

Modern explorers have found a previously unknown ocean -- but this one's on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Learn more from Chabot Space & Science Center's Ben Burress at KQED Science.

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NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope Shows Us Something New: A Disintegrating Asteroid

KQED Science | April 4, 2014 | 0 Comments

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope Shows Us Something New: A Disintegrating Asteroid

Upholding a long-standing tradition of showing us things in space that we have never seen before, the Hubble Space Telescope recently witnessed the break-up of an asteroid.

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NASA’s WISE Mission Reports No Signs of ‘Planet X’

KQED Science | March 21, 2014 | 1 Comment

NASA’s WISE Mission Reports No Signs of ‘Planet X’

A recent study of data collected by NASA's Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WISE) spacecraft may have exorcised the notion of the hypothetical existence of the fabled "Planet X."

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Martian Meteorite May Contain Evidence of Past Life on Mars

KQED Science | March 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

Martian Meteorite May Contain Evidence of Past Life on Mars

Investigation of an ancient Martian meteorite has re-fueled a debate about evidence of possible past life on Mars.

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Recent Observations Confirm Presence of Water Vapor on Dwarf Planet Ceres

KQED Science | February 21, 2014 | 0 Comments

Recent Observations Confirm Presence of Water Vapor on Dwarf Planet Ceres

Recent observations of the dwarf planet Ceres by the European Herschel Space Observatory have revealed for the first time the presence of water vapor on this object in the Main Asteroid Belt.

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The Cigar Galaxy Lights Up: Supernova 2014J

KQED Science | February 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Cigar Galaxy Lights Up: Supernova 2014J

Once upon a time in a galaxy 12 million light years away, a tiny white dwarf star went supernova, and for a few fleeting weeks was elevated in brightness to outshine the rest of the stars in its galaxy combined.

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Rosetta Wakes Up for Final Approach to a Comet

KQED Science | January 24, 2014 | 0 Comments

Rosetta Wakes Up for Final Approach to a Comet

On Monday, far beyond the orbit of Mars, an alarm clock went off and a robot began the slow process of waking up after a long, cold sleep. The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft is now approaching the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, which it will catch up with this May.

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Opposition of Jupiter: Bright Beauty in the Sky

KQED Science | January 10, 2014 | 0 Comments

Opposition of Jupiter: Bright Beauty in the Sky

The planet Jupiter is once again a source of surprise and wonder to many who gaze up at the night sky.

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Space 2013: Another Great Year of Cosmic Adventure

KQED Science | December 27, 2013 | 0 Comments

Space 2013: Another Great Year of Cosmic Adventure

Let's take a moment to tally a few of 2013's highlights of astronomy and space exploration. In brief, it was a very good year on a number of fronts.

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Farewell, Comet ISON, but There’s Other Celestial Visitors This Month

KQED Science | December 13, 2013 | 0 Comments

Farewell, Comet ISON, but There’s Other Celestial Visitors This Month

Comet ISON is gone, Comet Lovejoy remains and a sun-grazing asteroid, 3200 Phaeton, is showing comet-like behavior. An interesting December to say the least.

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Cassini or Curiosity: Budget Cuts Could Force NASA to Make A Tough Choice

KQED Science | November 29, 2013 | 3 Comments

Cassini or Curiosity: Budget Cuts Could Force NASA to Make A Tough Choice

If you had to make a choice to shut down either the Mars rover Curiosity or that explorer of the Saturn system Cassini, would you deliver a pink slip to the young, eager, energetic newbie or force an early retirement on a veteran explorer who has delivered volumes of knowledge?

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