KQED Introduces PBS KIDS

24/7 Channel Will Replace KQED Kids on January 16; PBS KIDS Free Multiplatform Service Includes Live Streaming and Interactive Games

PBSKIDS_logo_CSan Francisco, CA, December 20, 2016 — KQED will introduce the new television channel PBS KIDS to Bay Area viewers on January 16, 2017. The 24/7 children’s channel will replace KQED Kids in the Bay Area. In addition to the new on-air channel, PBS KIDS on KQED features free services including a live video stream and interactive games for children on various digital platforms. The effort is KQED’s latest initiative to support early learning in the community.

KQED will broadcast PBS KIDS shows 24 hours a day on channels 54.4 and 25.3 and offer a branded live stream, making it easy for Bay Area children to watch their favorite programs whenever and wherever they access media. Viewers will be able to watch the live stream through pbskids.org and on the PBS KIDS Video app, which is available on a variety of mobile devices and tablets. Soon after the January 16 launch, the live stream will also be available on over-the-top platforms such as Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV, Xbox One and Chromecast. The live stream complements on-demand clips and full episodes, which will continue to be available for free on the PBS KIDS Video App and streaming via pbskids.org.

Following its initial launch, the localized live stream experience will expand to offer integrated games, enabling children to toggle between a PBS KIDS show and an activity that extends learning — all in one seamless digital experience. The live stream and games feature are grounded in research demonstrating that measurable gains in learning are achieved when children engage with PBS KIDS content on multiple platforms. The games will align with the learning goals of each TV series, deepening children’s involvement and supporting learning.

The 24/7 PBS KIDS offering is an integral part of KQED’s long-term vision for its children’s service and will build on its reach and impact in the community, where it provides essential services for kids, parents and teachers. “KQED has been a trusted partner with Bay Area parents for years, delivering educational television content that makes measurable impacts in children’s early learning,” says Susie Hernandez, KQED’s senior director, television programming. “With the new PBS KIDS 24/7 channel, we’re able to continue to deliver and expand on the same high quality of programming, while also making it more accessible to Bay Area families through digital and other platforms.”

PBS KIDS on KQED will include popular favorites such as Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, Odd Squad, Wild Kratts and Dinosaur Train. PBS KIDS’ newest series Splash and Bubbles, Nature Cat and Ready Jet Go! will also be featured. KQED will provide the PBS KIDS 24/7 channel on 54.4 and 25.3; XFINITY 192 (Monterey/Salinas 372 and Sacramento/Fairfield 391). It is also available on the Wave and San Bruno Cable.

In addition to replacing KQED Kids with PBS KIDS, KQED will also reconfigure its weekday children’s schedule on its two primary television channels — KQED 9 and KQED Plus — to better serve the needs of younger and older audiences. Beginning January 16, KQED 9 will begin hosting an uninterrupted block of children’s programming from 6am to 2:30pm. KQED Plus will offer an uninterrupted block of programming for adult audiences during those same hours, and will feature an after-school block of children’s programming between the hours of 4 and 6pm.

For schedule and program information, visit kqed.org/tv.

ABOUT KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st-century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

www.kqed.org