KQED’s ImageMakers kicks off new season with 2011 Academy Award-winning short film

- Season premieres Saturday, April 23 at 7:30pm on KQED 9 -

- Ninth season features 2011 Academy Award-winning films The Lost Thing (Short Film – Animated) and God of Love (Short Film – Live Action) -

SAN FRANCISCO, March 18, 2011 – This April, KQED’s ImageMakers returns with a new season of short films by the moviemakers of tomorrow. The upcoming season features shorts from the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, Ireland, New Zealand, England, Sweden, and Denmark, and features award-winning films, including both winners of this year’s Academy Awards short film categories. The Lost Thing, winner of the Short Film (Animated) category, airs as part of the premiere April 23, and God of Love, winner of the Short Film (Live Action) category, is featured in the July 2 and July 24 episodes. The ninth season of ImageMakers premieres Saturday, April 23 at 7:30pm on KQED 9.

Despite their prevalence, many short films are rarely seen in the United States outside of film festivals, but KQED’s ImageMakers provides a forum for these entertaining and thought-provoking works. Each ImageMakers episode allows viewers to see, in most cases for the first time, short narrative works by emerging moviemakers who could become the next Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, or Francis Ford Coppola.  Many of the filmmakers have gone on to make feature films, including Jason Reitman (Thank You for Smoking and Juno), Neill Blomkamp (District 9), and Bay Area native Cary Fukanaga (Sin Nombre and the new adaptation of Jane Eyre).

ImageMakers includes works from student filmmakers, local and international filmmakers, and first-time Hollywood directors. Each film is personally selected by series producer and KQED Public Television program director Scott Dwyer, and each episode of ImageMakers groups films together around a central theme or topic. The films represent a wide array of genres and include some of the most creative comedies, cutting edge animation, and gripping dramas produced by independent filmmakers today. For the first time, this season will feature an hour-long special dedicated to the works from U.S. film schools, airing Sunday, July 24 at 10:30pm.

The series website, kqed.org/imagemakers, offers detailed descriptions of each episode, links to each filmmaker’s website, and opportunities to view some of the films again on the Web. The site also features interactive components that allow viewers to leave comments and vote for their favorite films.

About KQED

KQED (kqed.org) has served Northern California for more than 50 years and is affiliated with NPR and PBS. KQED owns and operates public television stations KQED 9 (San Francisco/Bay Area), KTEH 54 (San Jose/Bay Area), and KQET 25 (Watsonville/Monterey); KQED Public Radio (88.5FM San Francisco and 89.3FM Sacramento); the interactive platforms kqed.org, kteh.org, and KQEDnews.org; and KQED Education. KQED Public Television, one of the nation’s most-watched public television stations, is the producer of local and national series such as QUEST; Check, Please! Bay Area; This Week in Northern California; Truly CA; and Essential Pépin. KQED’s digital television channels include 9HD, Life, World, Kids, and V-me, and are available 24/7 on Comcast.  KQED Public Radio, home of Forum with Michael Krasny and The California Report, is one of the most-listened-to public radio stations in the nation with an award-winning news and public affairs program service delivering more than eighteen local newscasts daily.  KQED Interactive hosts KQED’s cross-platform news service, KQED News, as well as offers video and audio podcasts and a live radio stream at kqed.org. KQED Education brings the impact of KQED to thousands of teachers, students, parents, and the general public through workshops, community screenings, and multimedia resources.

###

 

ImageMakers Season Nine Episodes

 

Lost and Found

Saturday, April 23 at 7:30pm

  • The Lost Thing (Australia)

*Academy Award winner

A boy discovers a bizarre looking creature while out collecting bottle caps one day at the beach. Children’s book writer Shaun Tan directed this beautiful allegory exploring how we take for granted the world around us and how we ourselves can feel like we don’t belong.

  • INK (Australia)

A graffiti artist uses art to come to terms with a long lost toy and a stolen childhood. She struggles to trust or get close to anyone, until one day her work attracts the attention of a young man. Can two wounded souls find the courage to piece together the confusing fragments of the past that may lead to some resolution and healing?  Written and directed by Justine Wallace.

 

When Sparks Fly

Saturday, April 30 at 7:30pm

  • White Night (Canada)

What does it look like when your heart skips a beat?  Set in a black and white city, this stunning film captures the precise moment of connection between two strangers attracted to each other with such magnetism that nothing can keep them apart. Director and editor Arev Maoukian shows how CGI can be used for more than just aliens and robots.

  • Diplomacy (U.S.A.)

The U.S. Secretary of State and Iranian Foreign Minister don’t trust each other, and their antagonistic relationship has reached a boiling point. As the diplomats dig in their heels, it falls upon their interpreters to keep the meeting on track. The art of negotiation is used creatively and humorously when politics gets mixed with mutual attraction. Written and directed by Jon Goldman.

  • As the Rain Was Falling (France/Belgium)

When a storm breaks, a woman takes shelter under an archway where a man is also waiting for the rain to subside. Everything stops for a moment when their eyes meet. It may be raining, but the temperature starts to rise and sparks start to fly. Written, directed, and produced by Charlotte Joulia.

  • Moore Street Masala (Ireland)

Love is a big production – as if we needed proof. Dublin’s famous Moore Street market is shaken to its core with a spectacular dance finale featuring over 300 dancers rivaling Slumdog Millionaire. Written, directed, and edited by David O’Sullivan.

 

My First Crush

Saturday, May 7 at 7:30pm

  • The Crush (Ireland)

*Academy Award nominee

Ardal Travis is in love, but there’s just one small problem…him. He’s only eight years old and the object of his affection is his beautiful teacher Miss Purdy. He also has a bigger problem…Pierce. He is Miss Purdy’s fiancé. There’s only one thing Ardal can do…challenge the interloper to a duel! Written and directed by Michael Creagh.

  • Big Girl (Canada)

A battle of wills develops between nine year old Josephine and her mother’s new boyfriend – a “lowly” bartender – that leads to a winner-take-all competition. He may be man enough for her mother, but is he man enough to take care of them both? A bittersweet tale of modern family politics written and directed by Renuka Jeyapalan.

 

A Higher Power

Saturday, May 14 at 7:30pm

  • Glenn Owen Dodds (Australia)

Who is Glenn Owen Dodds?  Conman?  Charlatan?  Or is he as he says – the creator and ruler of the universe? A skeptical young man has serious doubts until Glenn starts revealing facts the young man has never told anyone. He may in fact be meeting his maker, but his meeting is only going to last five minutes. If you only had a few minutes with God, what would you ask him?  Directed by Frazer Bailey.

  • Touch (U.S.A.)

Sometimes standing on the edge can be very inviting. While waiting for a subway train, a commuter makes a shocking statement to the person next to her and learns how a simple act of kindness can alter one’s life.  Sometimes the most important connection in your life happens with a complete stranger. Directed by Jen McGowan.

 

Boys and Their Pets

Saturday, May 21 at 7:30pm

  • Chicken Heads (U.S.A./Palestine)

A prized sheep goes missing from a poor farmer’s land, and his eleven year old son is the only one who knows what happened. Young Yousef learns a harsh lesson when he tries to cover up the truth. Written and directed by Bassam Ali Jarbawi.

  • Bunny (U.S.A.)

A naïve young boy ventures into a rough part of town to retrieve his stolen pet bunny. Understanding and forgiveness are big words when you’re a little child. Writer/director Robert Snow offers a gritty, touching and uncompromising look at class differences in a tough Philadelphia suburb. Based on a true story.

 

Living in Dangerous Times

Saturday, May 28 at 7:30pm

  • Happy Sushi (U.S.A.)

The restaurant’s table has uneven legs, and the sushi chef and the waiter are having a heated argument in front of the customers. Oh well, so much for an enjoyable dinning experience. In times like this, the protagonist of Happy Sushi learns it’s best to keep a low profile.  Directed and edited by Andy Green.

  • Careful with that Axe (New Zealand)

A barefoot boy tries his hand at chopping firewood with his father’s razor sharp axe. The axe is so heavy he decides to balance himself by resting one foot on the chopping block. Did we mention he’s barefoot? Kids (and adults)…don’t try this at home. Written and directed by Jason Stutter.

  • The One Last Time (U.S.A.)

The last customers of the day are finishing up their business at a bank in downtown Los Angeles. What they don’t know is that two different groups of robbers have decided to rob the same bank, on the same day, and at the same time. Now throw in the cast from The Wizard of Oz, a bunch of super heroes, and a lot of guns. Written, produced, and directed by Scott Weintrob.

  • Park (France)

Welcome to a big park in a city, not like any other in cities around the world, where people come to enjoy their day. But on this day, four strangers are going to find their lives forever entwined in this heart-pounding tale of chance, mistaken perceptions, and unforeseen consequences.  Directed by Thierry Espasa.

 

That’s My Boy

Saturday, June 25 at 7:30pm

  • Franswa Sharl (Australia)

On a family holiday in Fiji, twelve year old Greg and his macho father have different ideas about what it takes to be a man.  When his behavior fails to amuse his father, Greg set out to win him back while still staying true to himself. Director Hannah Hilliard’s humorous tale is based on a true story and won the top prize at the Berlin Film Festival.

  • Parachute (U.S.A.)

A precocious young boy plays with toy paratroopers in his front yard and witnesses a man and a woman engaged in an extramarital affair. He confronts the man, and after an awkward beginning, and a little adventure at the mini-mart, they develop an unlikely friendship. Directed by Paul Grellong and Lucas Fleischer.

 

An Arrow Through the Heart

Saturday, July 2 at 7:30pm

  • God of Love (U.S.A.)

*Academy Award winner

Meet Raymond Goodfellow, a multi-talented artist who combines lounge singing with his champion dart throwing ability. He has fallen head over heels for his bass player, but she’s in love with the guitarist. His prayers are answered, or so he thinks, when he receives a package of passion-inducing darts. Writer/Director Luke Matheny also stars in the award-winning film.

  • Shooting Blanks (Ireland)

Cupid is an admitted alcoholic who has had his own heart broken one two many times. If he can’t be happy in love, why should anyone else? A new love potion offers him one last shot at redemption. Have his own bitter experiences poisoned him forever or will he be able to shoot a bull’s eye for Zoe and Martin? Written and directed by Liam Gavin.

 

In Sickness and in Health

Saturday, July 9 at 7:30pm

  • Love Song of Iskpa Prufrock (Australia)

Iskra Prufrock is a Croatian refugee who works as an X-ray technician. In an effort to recover from her violent past, she has made her life one of ritual with little contact with others. She finds her life a lonely one – at least until she meets Leo. Nothing in her life has been easy, and she soon learns, neither is love.  Written and directed by Lucy Gaffy.

  • Visiting Hours (England)

A man wakes up after 15 days in a coma and is told by his wife they have been in a serious car accident.  As Paul’s memory slowly returns, they realize they have a difficult decision to make that will test the depth of their love. Written, edited and directed by Steve Hughes.

 

Imagine a World Without Me

Saturday, July 16 at 7:30pm

  • See You (Denmark)

Fourteen year old Nete’s world collapses when her twin brother Noah is killed in a car accident. The family decides to move to Copenhagen to start life anew, but when Nete begins classes in a new school, she finds she is not the only new student … and the new boy looks exactly like her brother. Written and directed by Jesper Waldvogel Rasmussen, the film was shortlisted for a 2009 Academy Award.

 

Marriage is a Sentence

Sunday, July 17 at 10:30pm

  • Conversation Piece (England)

Jean notices a chip on a treasured vase. She accuses her husband, who, of course, denies it. Employing a variety of tactics, she gets him to confess. This ingenious musical, written and directed by Joe Tunmer, matches every syllable of dialogue to every note from a 1966 improvised recording entitled “Conversation Piece” by cornetist Rex Stewart.

  • This is Christmas (England)

The table has been set for a beautiful romantic dinner. Unfortunately, the first course includes a heaping helping of deeply buried resentment – a dish that is best served very, very cold. The next time you are invited to a Christmas dinner, be sure to try the parsnips. A black comedy written and directed by Alex Norris.

  • Seeds of the Fall (Sweden)

Middle-aged Rolf and Eva live in a passionless relationship full of sexual frustration. Then a bulldozer (a real bulldozer) comes to shake up their lives forever and next-door neighbor Glenn comes knocking with a rather unusual offer. Welcome to the quirky, off-kilter world of writer/director Patrik Eklund. The film won top prize at the Cannes Film Festival and was short listed for a 2011 Academy Award.

 

Film School Shorts I

Sunday, July 24 at 10:30pm

  • God of Love (U.S.A.)

*Academy Award winner

Meet Raymond Goodfellow, a multi-talented artist who combines lounge singing with his champion dart throwing ability. He has fallen head over heels for his bass player, but she’s in love with the guitarist. His prayers are answered, or so he thinks, when he receives a package of passion-inducing darts. Writer/Director Luke Matheny, who attended NYU Film School, also stars in the award-winning film.

  • Blue Boy (U.S.A.)

Every summer morning, 17 year old Kenny rides his bike to the wealthier part of town to his job as a lifeguard. Invisible to the moneyed moms and socialite girls who populate the country club, Kenny spends his work hours stoned and fantasizing about the women around him, until an act of heroism gives him the opportunity to act on his daydreams. Directed by UCLA film student Alex Jablonski.

  • Chicken Heads (U.S.A./Palestine)

A prized sheep goes missing from a poor farmer’s land, and his eleven year old son is the only one who knows what happened. Young Yousef learns a harsh lesson when he tries to cover up the truth. Written and directed by Bassam Ali Jarbawi.

  • Bunny (U.S.A.)

A naïve young boy ventures into a rough part of town to retrieve his stolen pet bunny. Understanding and forgiveness are big words when you’re a little child. Writer/director Robert Snow offers a gritty, touching and uncompromising look at class differences in a tough Philadelphia suburb. Based on a true story.

 

Media Contact: Meredith Gandy

415.553.2116, mgandy@kqed.org