KQED Wins Major Funding for Project to Improve Media Literacy and Curb the Spread of Misinformation

Hero-Image-iStock-507476828-smallKQED LEARN, AN ONLINE PLATFORM TO PROMOTE MEDIA LITERACY AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE, IS AMONG 20 PROJECTS IN DEVELOPMENT THAT HAVE BEEN SELECTED TO SHARE $1 MILLION THROUGH THE KNIGHT PROTOTYPE FUND.

San Francisco, CA — KQED will develop a new service to help promote media literacy skills among young people and combat the proliferation of fake news with major funding from the Knight Prototype Fund, an initiative of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation that helps people explore early-stage media and information ideas. KQED Learn, launching in March 2018, is a free online classroom tool that encourages students and teachers to ask and investigate critical questions that deepen learning and improve media literacy.

KQED Learn was among 20 winning projects that will share a $1 million award through the Knight Prototype Fund open call on accurate information. Launched in March, by Knight Foundation, the Democracy Fund and the Rita Allen Foundation the open call asked for ideas to address misinformation and build trust in news.

“This is a tremendous honor for KQED Learn to be recognized with such a promising group of projects,” says Robin Mencher, executive director, KQED Education. “Obviously, media literacy and fake news are particularly critical issues in these times, and it’s important to approach these problems from a number of angles. Public media is particularly well suited to address media literacy, the dissemination of accurate information, and the public interest.”

“To address the rampant spread of misinformation we need to ensure that our educators and our young people, the future builders of strong, informed communities, have the tools they need to question news that might be misleading or incorrect,” said Chris Barr, Knight Foundation director for technology innovation. “Lessons from KQED Learn will advance this goal, helping develop a better understanding of media literacy and how people consume information.”

Knight Foundation launched the Knight Prototype Fund in 2012 to encourage organizations to experiment, learn and iterate before moving on to the more costly stage of building out a project. This year’s winners were recognized at the Investigative Reporters and Editors Conference in Phoenix.

To read the Knight Foundation’s press release and learn about all of the winning projects, click here.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st-century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.  www.kqed.org