KQED Wins Major Funding for Project to Improve Media Literacy and Curb the Spread of Misinformation

Hero-Image-iStock-507476828-smallKQED LEARN, AN ONLINE PLATFORM TO PROMOTE MEDIA LITERACY AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE, IS AMONG 20 PROJECTS IN DEVELOPMENT THAT HAVE BEEN SELECTED TO SHARE $1 MILLION THROUGH THE KNIGHT PROTOTYPE FUND.

San Francisco, CA — KQED will develop a new service to help promote media literacy skills among young people and combat the proliferation of fake news with major funding from the Knight Prototype Fund, an initiative of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation that helps people explore early-stage media and information ideas. KQED Learn, launching in March 2018, is a free online classroom tool that encourages students and teachers to ask and investigate critical questions that deepen learning and improve media literacy.

KQED Learn was among 20 winning projects that will share a $1 million award through the Knight Prototype Fund open call on accurate information. Launched in March, by Knight Foundation, the Democracy Fund and the Rita Allen Foundation the open call asked for ideas to address misinformation and build trust in news.

“This is a tremendous honor for KQED Learn to be recognized with such a promising group of projects,” says Robin Mencher, executive director, KQED Education. “Obviously, media literacy and fake news are particularly critical issues in these times, and it’s important to approach these problems from a number of angles. Public media is particularly well suited to address media literacy, the dissemination of accurate information, and the public interest.”

“To address the rampant spread of misinformation we need to ensure that our educators and our young people, the future builders of strong, informed communities, have the tools they need to question news that might be misleading or incorrect,” said Chris Barr, Knight Foundation director for technology innovation. “Lessons from KQED Learn will advance this goal, helping develop a better understanding of media literacy and how people consume information.”

Knight Foundation launched the Knight Prototype Fund in 2012 to encourage organizations to experiment, learn and iterate before moving on to the more costly stage of building out a project. This year’s winners were recognized at the Investigative Reporters and Editors Conference in Phoenix.

To read the Knight Foundation’s press release and learn about all of the winning projects, click here.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st-century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.  www.kqed.org

NAMLE Awards KQED for Media Literacy Efforts

KQED Teach-blog-imageSAN FRANCISCO, CA — The National Association for Media Literacy (NAMLE) has announced that KQED is a recipient of a 2017 Media Literate Media (MLM) Award for advancing media literacy projects. The MLM awards recognize mainstream media organizations for making outstanding contributions in covering, encouraging and teaching media literacy. Launched in July 2016, KQED’s major media literacy service KQED Teach provides a series of free, self-paced online courses to help K–12 educators and students improve media literacy skills in a safe, fun, professional learning community.

“For KQED Teach to be recognized with such a distinguished award — particularly in just our first year — is just a tremendous honor for KQED,” says Robin Mencher, executive director, KQED Learning. “We are proud of the work we are doing in helping to advancing media literacy in the classroom — a fundamental skill for civic participation and one that is perhaps in greater need now than ever before.”

KQED Teach courses take place in an online platform developed by KQED Learning that tracks user progress and encourages sharing and feedback through an integrated social community. Participants have access to a wide range of social media and digital media tools, allowing them to construct and remix media in multiple formats and across a variety of platforms while addressing many writing, reading, speaking and listening skills required by both the Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards.

Selected by a committee composed of the NAMLE board of directors, educators and media literacy experts, the biennial NAMLE awards (including the MLM awards) recognize people, programs, initiatives or organizations that have raised the visibility of media literacy education or media literacy; have helped citizens better understand media literacy education or media literacy; and have provided significant, outstanding resources that enhance the ability of educators to practice the kind of inquiry-based media literacy education.

Previous winners of NAMLE MLM Award include the PBS NewsHour, The Daily Show With Jon Stewart, Snopes.com, Creative Commons and the Ella Baker Center/Van Jones. In addition to KQED Teach, WNYC’s On the Media and truTV’s Adam Ruins Everything will also receive 2017 MLM awards. The winners will be formally presented with their awards on June 27 at this year’s NAMLE conference in Chicago.
About KQED Learning
KQED Learning provides educators and young people multimedia content, experiential activities, and professional tools to create learning environments of the 21st century by promoting civic engagement, creative expression, and problem solving using digital media.
www.kqed.org/learning

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st-century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.
www.kqed.org

KQED Learning Launches a New Website for Educators to Amplify Youth Voice, Civic Engagement, and Media Literacy in a Digital World

Hero-Image-iStock-507476828-Large-CroppedKQED, a member station of NPR and PBS based in San Francisco, announces the launch of the new KQED Learning online hub. KQED Learning serves educators with free and open digital content and tools focused on amplifying youth voice, making media, civic engagement, and real-world media literacy.  KQED Learning is a “go-to” resource for professional learning programs, cutting edge media-making and creativity tools, and standards-aligned activities and content that encourage critical media consumption, thoughtful responses and perspectives, and inquiry- and project-based learning that crosses the curriculum.

A core component of the new KQED Learning  is KQED Teach, a professional learning platform and source for a growing lineup of free online courses for educators. Courses are self- paced and cover media literacy topics and concepts using a hands-on, media-making approach. In addition to practical “how-to” instruction, KQED Teach courses provide creative insights about integrating media content and media-making activities into instruction to engage students. Among the available professional learning course topics are Media Foundations, Communicating with Photography, Making Infographics, and Interactive Timelines.

Courses feature rich content and guide educators through the processes of making media so they’re prepared to teach their students how to use digital resources to learn, communicate, collaborate, consume and make media critically. KQED Teach courses are free and give teachers the flexibility to learn and build skills when it’s most convenient for them.

KQED Learning  offers educator-developed projects, activities and cross-curricular content to encourage student participation through media-making and collaboration. Content includes interactives, and project ideas that encourage students to question, investigate, make media, share, and reflect.

An example of the instructional content from KQED Learning is Engineering for Good, a three-week, NGSS-aligned, project-based learning unit that gives middle school students hands-on experience with the engineering design process as they develop solutions for the impacts of plastics on the environment.

In the Classroom is an educator blog, featuring educator-developed classroom integration ideas, success stories, media-making ideas, and discussion threads to help teachers boost student engagement and participation in their classrooms. Coming later in the 2017-18 school year are additional content, courses for teachers, resources that focus on a variety of contemporary issues, integrating news into instruction, science and STEAM content, and other youth engagement and publishing programs.

Robin Mencher, Executive Director, KQED Learning noted, “Educators who are looking for standards-aligned instructional content, professional learning opportunities, and timely, high-quality digital resources will find a trusted, valued partner in the new KQED Learning hub. We are focused on media literacy in today’s digital world—an approach that encompasses not only critical media consumption but creative media-making as a way to express ideas and opinions, enrich learning, and solve problems. Our public media mission and education commitment give us a unique capacity to address new and emerging learning needs and opportunities for educators and students. Our platforms and resources are the launching pads for a new era in engaged teaching and learning.”

About KQED Learning
KQED Learning is a hub for learning and engagement for educators and students alike and provides multimedia content, experiential activities, and professional tools to create 21st century learning environments by promoting civic engagement, creative expression, critical thinking, and problem solving using digital media. KQED Learning is the education arm of KQED.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration – exposing them to new people, places and ideas.

KQED’s Above the Noise Empowers Teens with the Facts Behind Real-World Issues

Above the Noise Email Banner2

KQED Launches Above the Noise, a New YouTube Series that Empowers Teens with the Facts Behind Real-World Issues that Affect Their Lives

San Francisco, CA — KQED announces the launch of Above the Noise, a new YouTube series for teens premiering on March 1 that cuts through the hype and dives deep into the science behind the issues affecting their daily lives. The series has two dynamic young hosts: journalists Myles Bess and Shirin Ghaffary. Together, they take a closer look at topics that are often sensationalized or distorted in the media, examining the latest research to inspire young viewers to draw informed conclusions, strengthen their media literacy skills and activate interest in civic engagement.

“In this new era of fake news and ‘alternative facts,’ I want to provide my peers with another perspective that will enable them to look beyond the surface level of what they’ve seen in their social feeds or have been told,” says Myles.

The series launches with two episodes — one about how to identify signs of misleading science reporting and another exploring the relationships between social status and health (Video preview links embargoed until March 1). In the coming months, new videos will examine wide-ranging questions such as: whether energy drinks should be banned for kids and teens; if there are health benefits to marijuana; how data impacts racial bias in the criminal justice system; and whether social media platforms like Snapchat influence mood. Each 4-5 minute episode incorporates animation, music, news and archival footage to analyze multiple perspectives, grab young viewers’ attention and to make complex subject matters relatable and relevant to teens’ every day experience.

Engagement with the audience is core to the series. Every other week, Bess and Ghaffary appear in a more casual talk show-like format to reflect on the previous week’s episode. They share their personal feelings and experiences with the issues, address viewers’ comments and questions, and encourage teens to contribute their own story ideas. “We want to develop a relationship with our audience,” says Annelise Wunderlich, Above the Noise series producer. “The goal of these episodes is to give us a deeper understanding of viewers’ needs and concerns, and to give teens a sense of ownership over the series.”

The series draws from KQED’s expertise as a public media organization dedicated to investigating scientific and news topics with the highest journalistic standards. Above the Noise leverages KQED editorial staff, connections with outside journalists, top research institutions, and youth media in the Bay Area. The series also incorporates feedback from a youth advisory panel of 13 Bay Area teens from diverse backgrounds. “With Above the Noise we aspire to engage with youth directly about the issues that are affecting them,” says Robin Mencher, Executive Director, KQED Learning. “We want to encourage youth to develop their ability to understand and use the power of facts and the research behind them, and challenge their own assumptions about whatever might be happening in the news, social media, and their own lives.”

Shirin echoes those aspirations: “I hope viewers will learn something new with every episode. And over time, learn how to use a scientific approach to make an informed argument about complicated topics that come up in the news every day.”

Above the Noise is a production of KQED’s education unit, KQED Learning, which provides educators and young people free content, cutting-edge tools, and activities that promote civic engagement, creative expression and problem-solving in the classroom using digital media. “KQED Learning has steadily developed a reputation among educators as a go-to resource for finding tools for teaching media literacy and personal connections to learning,” says David Markus, Executive in Charge, KQED Arts, Food, and Education. “Above the Noise will be a powerful tool for teachers and students in the classroom and beyond.”

To subscribe to Above the Noise and start watching, visit youtube.com/abovethenoise.

 

About the Hosts
Myles Bess is an aspiring filmmaker and writer from Oakland, California. Prior to joining KQED he worked for Youth Radio in Oakland where he reported on juvenile justice, education, and community organizing issues. His stories have appeared on National Public Radio, Marketplace and the San Francisco Chronicle. Currently a student at San Francisco State University studying broadcast and electronic communication, Bess looks forward to expanding his knowledge and understanding of multimedia while tackling issues that hit close to home.

Shirin Ghaffary is a freelance journalist and recent graduate of UC Berkeley with a degree in English and International Economics. As a student, Ghaffary ran the news desk of the Daily Californian. She has also interned and worked for a number of media outlets, including the Wall Street Journal, San Francisco Chronicle, and TechCrunch. In addition to her journalistic pursuits, she presently works for a software startup, and is especially excited about topics that relate to tech.


Producer Credits
Executive Producer, Annelise Wunderlich
Producers, Derek Lartaud and Lauren Farrar

Support
S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation
David Bulfer and Kelly Pope
Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation
The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation
The Koret Foundation
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Smart Family Foundation
The Vadasz Family Foundation


About KQED Learning

KQED Learning provides educators and young people multimedia content, experiential activities, and professional tools to create learning environments of the 21st century by promoting civic engagement, creative expression, and problem solving using digital media.

About KQED
KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program helping students and educators thrive in 21st-century classrooms. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas.
www.kqed.org

The National Writing Project and KQED Launch Letters to the Next President

Young people offer candidates advice on the issues they care about.

LTP-logoAs the nation prepares to elect a new President, The National Writing Project and KQED are hosting a collective of nonprofits and public media organizations across the United States to engage middle and high school students in the election. Letters to the Next President 2.0 (L2P 2.0) offers teachers resources, learning opportunities, and curriculum ideas that tap election-year excitement to get young people reading, researching, writing, making media and talking about issues that matter to them.

“This project will create opportunities for educators to further engage youth in concerns that are central to their future,” said Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, executive director of National Writing Project. “It is important for students to be civically involved and lend their voice to a conversation about the ideas and issues of the upcoming election.”

Throughout the Spring and Summer, L2P 2.0 partners will share resources and opportunities to hone research, writing, and media making skills. By getting young people to explore questions like, “From your perspective, what are the issues the next president pay should attention to, and why?,” Letters to the Next President 2.0 gives teachers and parents tools to help teenagers become more engaged citizens and, eventually, voters.

“As a public media organization, KQED is excited to join this effort to make sure that youth have a platform to be heard on Election Day,” said Tim Olson, Vice President, Digital Media and Education. “Whether it’s the environment, jobs, human rights or healthcare, when a student knows how to produce a video or write compellingly for social media about a heart-felt issue, they can have a powerful voice in the political conversation right now.”

Later this year, Letters to the Next President 2.0 will launch a showcase website where young people 13–18 will be invited to publish and tag their work among other youth from around the country. This site will be open for entries up until the election and will remain open to promote and highlight youth voice and work into the inaugural year.

In the last Presidential Election, 10,000 students from over 800 schools nationwide participated in the first Letters to the Next President initiative.

Visit letters2president.org to connect and learn more and follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #nextprez.

###

About KQED Education
Education is central to the mandate of public media. KQED Education engages with community and educational organizations to broaden and deepen the impact of KQED’s award-winning media. KQED Education addresses the needs of educators in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), arts and news by creating cutting-edge learning media, providing training in digital learning tools and distributing public media content to classrooms in the Bay Area and beyond via the KQED website, PBS LearningMedia and iTunes U.

About the National Writing Project
Through its mission, the National Writing Project (NWP) focuses the knowledge, expertise, and leadership of our nation’s educators on sustained efforts to help youth become successful writers and learners. NWP supports a network of local Writing Project sites, located on nearly 200 university and college campuses, to provide high-quality professional development in schools, universities, libraries, museums, and after-school programs. Through its many successful programs and partnerships, the organization reaches 1.4 million Pre-K through college-age students in over 3,000 school districts annually. NWP envisions a future where every person is an accomplished writer, engaged learner, and active participant in a digital, interconnected world.

 

KQED Education

Education is central to the mandate of public media. KQED Education engages with community and educational organizations to broaden and deepen the impact of KQED’s award-winning media. KQED Education addresses the needs of educators in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), arts and news by creating cutting-edge learning media, providing training in digital learning tools and distributing public media content to classrooms in the Bay Area and beyond via the KQED website, PBS LearningMedia and iTunes U. kqed.org/education

 

Latest News

Roadtrip Nation A Balanced Equation

Women in S.T.E.M aren’t a dime a dozen, they’re more like a needle in a haystack. The newest four-part miniseries from the people who brought you The Next Mission and Why Not Us? Bring you an exploration of what it takes for women in this world to make it in the S.T.E.M fields. Bring you […]

Jul 21, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Wins Major Funding for Project to Improve Media Literacy and Curb the Spread of Misinformation

KQED LEARN, AN ONLINE PLATFORM TO PROMOTE MEDIA LITERACY AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE, IS AMONG 20 PROJECTS IN DEVELOPMENT THAT HAVE BEEN SELECTED TO SHARE $1 MILLION THROUGH THE KNIGHT PROTOTYPE FUND. San Francisco, CA — KQED will develop a new service to help promote media literacy skills among young people and combat the proliferation of fake […]

Jun 27, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

NAMLE Awards KQED for Media Literacy Efforts

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — The National Association for Media Literacy (NAMLE) has announced that KQED is a recipient of a 2017 Media Literate Media (MLM) Award for advancing media literacy projects. The MLM awards recognize mainstream media organizations for making outstanding contributions in covering, encouraging and teaching media literacy. Launched in July 2016, KQED’s major media […]

Jun 09, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Takes Home 5 Northern California Emmy® Awards

Following an impressive 17 nominations KQED has been honored with five Northern California Emmy® Awards, celebrating outstanding achievement in television and by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS). The 46th Emmy® ceremony, held Saturday, June 3, at the SFJAZZ Center, honored excellence in all fields of television and online production. The KQED productions […]

Jun 06, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

The Trials of Marvin Mutch

KQED digital documentary explores the life of Marvin Mutch as he negotiates his way through the California parole system and his re-entry into society after 40 years behind bars.    “All of my life, I’ve had this desire to fix things that were wrong. There’s nothing noble about it . . . It’s part of my […]

May 19, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED’s Truly CA Announces 12th Season of Films Celebrating California

KQED’s documentary series Truly CA: Our State, Our Stories returns for its 12th season with a dozen films covering topics from healing through dance to the San Francisco comedy scene of the 1980s.

May 18, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Receives Six Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards

KQED is the proud recipient of six regional Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA). The awards recognize the best electronic journalism produced by radio, television and digital news organizations around the world. The KQED News and KQED Science teams received an award for Continuing Coverage for their reporting on […]

May 03, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Wins Prestigious Webby Award for Deep Look’s Mosquito Video

KQED’s YouTube science series Deep Look won a Webby People’s Voice Award this week in the science and education video category with its three-minute video ‘How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood.’

Apr 28, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED Learning Launches a New Website for Educators to Amplify Youth Voice, Civic Engagement, and Media Literacy in a Digital World

KQED, a member station of NPR and PBS based in San Francisco, announces the launch of the new KQED Learning online hub. KQED Learning serves educators with free and open digital content and tools focused on amplifying youth voice, making media, civic engagement, and real-world media literacy.  KQED Learning is a “go-to” resource for professional […]

Apr 25, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post

KQED’s Check, Please! Bay Area Taste & Sip Event Is Bigger Than Ever

KQED’s popular Check, Please! Bay Area Taste & Sip food and wine tasting will be held Tuesday, May 23, 2017, from 6:30 to 9pm at the San Francisco Design Center Galleria.

Apr 24, 2017 | 0 comments | View Post