KitTea Cat Cafe Coming to San Francisco!

| January 23, 2014
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Photo: Jeff and Neda Fields, via Flickr

Considering that the internet is approximately 85% comprised of cat-related media, you’ve most likely seen a few videos or snapshots of the cat cafes in Tokyo. And soon you’ll get the chance to be in those videos and snapshots! KitTea, “a tea house oasis for cats and cat lovers,” is coming to San Francisco this year. Maybe your landlord won’t let you have a pet or your ex won the custody battle; all of that doesn’t matter anymore! In addition to giving humans the opportunity to leave their stressful days behind to mellow out with some therapeutic kitty love and tea, the cafe is also set to be a sort of halfway home for adoptable cats, as founders Courtney Hatt and David Braginsky plan to collaborate with a local rescue to match each cat with “a forever home.” And a “purrcentage” of the cafe’s proceeds will be donated to the rescue and the care of the felines.

Beyond the obvious awesomeness of this project, it’s a welcome change in the way our culture thinks of cat lovers. There are so many assumptions and negative stereotypes attached to being a cat person. You’re either deranged like that woman from The Simpsons. Or you’re crazy and have bad hygiene like Big and Little Edie. Or you’re cripplingly introverted and socially awkward. A lot of that has to do with judging single women, but that’s a rant for another blog post. Suffice it to say that at last cats are getting their due. Sure, they’re not as instantly accessible as dogs, but they were revered by the ancient Egyptians so we’ll call it even.

Now for some cat cafe action to get you ready for KitTea’s arrival. Just pretend you’re Kitty Purry‘s mom, Katy Perry.

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About the Author ()

Emmanuel Hapsis studied creative writing at University of Maryland, College Park and went on to receive his MFA in the field from California College of the Arts. After a few years of odd jobs, he landed at KQED, where he worked his way up from an intern to being the lead producer of a literature podcast and then the creator and editor of KQED Pop. In his free time, he teaches yoga and sings his heart out at karaoke.
  • Lee

    I couldn’t agree more about the negative cat stereotypes, it is definitely time for cats to shine!

  • Jeff Smith

    I was a “dog person” half my life, but now that I’ve had two cats. I love em, they are really much more complicated and very interesting animals. I’ve learned how to be a better friend, giving space, respect and patience. Also its not true about lack of affection, our cat tucks me in every night with a goodnight pet/head rub and wakes me every morning with a gentle paw and a purr. He follows us around all day, meets us at the door. It’s awesome!