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News Pix: New BART Cars, Berkeley Fire and Modern Art in Silicon Valley

| April 18, 2014
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BART unveiled its “Fleet of the Future” train cars on Wednesday, April 16, inviting the public to tour a model train in downtown San Francisco. The car was greeted with mixed reviews. The most pointed criticism came from riders with disabilities, who argued that the design provides less accessibility for disabled passengers. (Mark Andrew Boyer/KQED)
BART unveiled its “Fleet of the Future” train cars on Wednesday, April 16, inviting the public to tour a model train in downtown San Francisco. The car was greeted with mixed reviews. The most pointed criticism came from riders with disabilities, who argued that the design provides less accessibility for disabled passengers. (Mark Andrew Boyer/KQED)

Activists were joined by the city’s public defender and Supervisor David Campos at a rally in front of City Hall on Wednesday, April 16, calling on the city to ramp up funding for eviction defense. According to activists, tenants facing eviction often lose because they can’t afford attorneys, and there is a scarcity of city funding available to the network of nonprofits offering legal assistance. (Bryan Goebel/KQED)
Activists were joined by the city’s public defender and Supervisor David Campos at a rally in front of City Hall on Wednesday, April 16, calling on the city to ramp up funding for eviction defense. According to activists, tenants facing eviction often lose because they can’t afford attorneys, and there is a scarcity of city funding available to the network of nonprofits offering legal assistance. (Bryan Goebel/KQED)

The remains of The Wooden Duck warehouse, as seen from above, after a five-alarm fire Saturday, April 12. Some of the businesses at the location on Berkeley’s Eastshore Highway survived largely intact, but 20 artisans whose equipment and crafts were housed in the same building complex lost everything. (Todd Forbush/Berkeleyside)
The remains of warehouse at 1800-1810 Second St. that was  destroyed in a five-alarm fire Saturday, April 12, 2014. The building held stock from Import Tile and house Joshua Tree Furniture. The Wooden Duck also lost stock in the blaze but its showroom, on Eastshore Highway, survived largely intact. (Todd Forbush/Berkeleyside)

Art on display at the inaugural Silicon Valley Contemporary and Modern Fine Art Fair. The fair, which ran from April 10 to 13, focused on the convergence of technology and art, showcasing works inspired by the digital world. (Katie Brigham/Peninsula Press)
Art on display at the inaugural Silicon Valley Contemporary and Modern Fine Art Fair. The fair, which ran from April 10 to 13, focused on the convergence of technology and art, showcasing works inspired by the digital world. (Katie Brigham/Peninsula Press)

At the Silicon Valley Contemporary and Modern Fine Art Fair all pieces had some relationship to tech. Mobile photography was highlighted, and sculptures and paintings were either produced using new technologies or highlighted themes related to the digital world. (Katie Brigham/Peninsula Press)
At the Silicon Valley Contemporary and Modern Fine Art Fair all pieces had some relationship to tech. Mobile photography was highlighted, and sculptures and paintings were either produced using new technologies or highlighted themes related to the digital world. (Katie Brigham/Peninsula Press)

Spanish-speaking green card holders filed into the San Jose City College gym on April 12 for Santa Clara County’s annual Citizenship Day. Held by the Santa Clara County Citizenship Collaborative, Citizenship Day provides orientation, assistance and legal assessment regarding the citizenship process in a total of 14 different languages. (Tre’vell Anderson/Peninsula Press)
Spanish-speaking green card holders filed into the San Jose City College gym on April 12 for Santa Clara County’s annual Citizenship Day. Held by the Santa Clara County Citizenship Collaborative, Citizenship Day provides orientation, assistance and legal assessment regarding the citizenship process in a total of 14 different languages. (Tre’vell Anderson/Peninsula Press)

**The original version of this story stated that The Wooden Duck owned the warehouse that burned at 1800-1810 Second street in West Berkeley. The warehouse is actually owned by Import Tile.

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Category: Arts and Entertainment, Transportation

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About the Author ()

Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco. She's worked at KPCC public radio in LA and has reported, produced and blogged on health, climate change and local news for KQED in San Francisco. Reach Katrina Schwartz at kschwartz@kqed.org.

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