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News Pix: MLK Day, Berkeley Time Capsule, and Dusty Old Dust

| January 24, 2014
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Barry Dugar, from Richmond, helped distribute fruit tree saplings at the Richmond Greenway as part of Richmond's Martin Luther King Jr Day celebration. The non-profit Self-Sustaining Communities, which operates an urban farm in Richmond, handed out 500 fruit trees, including plum, peach, apricot, and cherry varieties. (Mark Andrew Boyer / KQED)Barry Dugar of Richmond helped distribute fruit tree saplings at the Richmond Greenway as part of Richmond’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration. The nonprofit Self-Sustaining Communities, which operates an urban farm in Richmond, gave away 500 trees, including plum, peach, apricot and cherry varieties. (Mark Andrew Boyer/KQED)

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner joined a trio of Central Valley Republican Congressmen in a dusty cotton field near Bakersfield on Wednesday to throw his support behind emergency legislation to ease the impact of the state's drought on farmers. But the proposed bill is not without its critics, since it would roll back environmental measures that have been years in the making. (Sasha Khokha/KQED)House Speaker John Boehner joined a trio of Central Valley Republican congressmen in a cotton field near Bakersfield on Wednesday to throw his support behind a proposed bill to ease the drought’s impact on farmers. But the plan is not without its critics, since it would roll back environmental measures that have been years in the making. (Sasha Khokha/KQED)

A time capsule discovered last week during the demolition of a Berkeley community church included a carefully wrapped 1875 family bible from one of the church's founding members, as well as pro-temperance fliers written by the pastor. (Leonard Nielson / Berkeleyside)

A time capsule discovered last week during the demolition of a Berkeley community church included a carefully wrapped 1875 family bible from one of the church’s founding members, as well as temperance fliers written by the pastor. (Leonard Nielson/Berkeleyside)

Nail artist Britney Tokyo gives friend and client Roxy Ferrari a manicure using a few Cha Cha Cover decals, paint and charms. (Caitlin Esch/KQED)In California, manicures are big business. Nail shops and other manicure services bring in billions of dollars nationwide. Nail artist Britney Tokyo gives friend and client Roxy Ferrari a manicure using a few decals, paint and charms. (Caitlin Esch/KQED)

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About the Author ()

Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco. She's worked at KPCC public radio in LA and has reported, produced and blogged on health, climate change and local news for KQED in San Francisco. Reach Katrina Schwartz at kschwartz@kqed.org.

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