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Local Sportswriters, Athletes and Fans Reflect on Candlestick

| December 20, 2013
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Several guests on Forum said that surviving the Loma Prieta earthquake was Candlestick's finest hour. Photo: Deborah Svoboda

Several guests on Forum said that surviving the Loma Prieta earthquake was Candlestick’s finest hour. Photo: Deborah Svoboda

On Friday, Forum discussed Candlestick Park’s legacy: the legends who played there, the earthquake that shook the ’89 World Series, the fans who begrudgingly embraced it, and of course, the wind.

Guests included Ray Ratto, columnist for CSN Bay Area.com, and Ann Killion, sports columnist for The San Francisco Chronicle, who recalled great moments in Candlestick’s history as well provided a behind-the-scenes peek at what it was like to work at the park.

Ronnie Lott, former cornerback and safety for the San Francisco 49ers, who says the losses stayed with him just as much as the victories; Duane Kuiper, broadcaster and former second baseman for the San Francisco Giants, who thinks that Candlestick’s weather gave the Giants a huge home-field advantage, and Bill Martin, chief meteorologist for KTVU Channel 2, who explained why Candlestick is so dang windy.

Here are highlights from the show:

Or you can listen to the full show here:

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About the Author ()

Amanda Stupi is the Engagement Producer for KQED’s daily public affairs program Forum. In that role she turns the information shared during the hour-long call-in show into web-friendly content. Her writing has been featured throughout KQED.org, including on KQED Arts and News Fix as well as on MLB.com, Hyphen Magazine and the San Francisco Examiner. Her radio work has aired on The California Report and Talk of the Nation. Stupi runs the @KQEDForum Twitter account and Forum Facebook account. Her personal Twitter account is @FiftyCentHotdog. She believes that Hostess products get a bad rap and that cereal can save the world. Reach Amanda Stupi at astupi@kqed.org.

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