video games

Defining the Differences in Screen Time

Defining the Differences in Screen Time

| March 15, 2011 | 0 Comments

Context is as important as content. Time, place and purpose matter. Pushing forward our discussion about the value of games and apps, David Kleeman wrote in response to the article: “Every screen has benefits and cautions, quality content and junk.” In this essay on the Huffington Post, Kleeman, who’s the president of the American Center […]

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Screen Time For Kids: Is it Learning or a Brain Drain?

Screen Time For Kids: Is it Learning or a Brain Drain?

| March 11, 2011 | 8 Comments

When it comes to video games and apps, what’s a parent to do? On one hand, we’re bombarded with messages about the perils of letting kids play with computer games and gadgets. On the other, we’re seduced by games and apps marketed to us as “educational.” It’s a tricky line to navigate. The spectrum of […]

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Gaming and Learning: Canterbury Tales Meets World of Warcraft

Gaming and Learning: Canterbury Tales Meets World of Warcraft

| March 3, 2011 | 0 Comments

It’s always gratifying to hear from students commenting on MindShift articles. The Huffington Post’s publishing of “Ten Surprising Truths About Video Games,” received a slew of responses. My two favorites: One who pointed to a video putting James Gee’s theories of gaming and learning to action by creating a movie made from World of Warcraft […]

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Ten Surprising Truths about Video Games and Learning

Ten Surprising Truths about Video Games and Learning

| February 24, 2011 | 17 Comments

“Your brain’s important, but not all that important,” said Dr. James Paul Gee, a professor at Arizona State University and a leading authority on literacy and the potential of educational games, during a talk at the Learning and Brain conference last week. By that he means the following: What we’d assumed about the importance of […]

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How Technology Wires the Learning Brain

How Technology Wires the Learning Brain

| February 23, 2011 | 15 Comments

Kids between the ages of 8 and 18 spend 11.5 hours a day using technology — whether that’s computers, television, mobile phones, or video games – and usually more than one at a time. That’s a big chunk of their 15 or 16 waking hours. But does that spell doom for the next generation? Not […]

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Video Games as Learning Tools

Video Games as Learning Tools

| February 18, 2011 | 1 Comment

I spent a fascinating day at the Learning and the Brain Conference in San Francisco yesterday, and learned a lot about cognitive functions, memory retention, the learning process, and much more. One of the highlights for me was hearing James Gee, faculty affiliate of the Games, Learning, and Society group at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, […]

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Can Creating Computer Games Develop Reading and Writing Skills?

Can Creating Computer Games Develop Reading and Writing Skills?

| January 28, 2011 | 1 Comment

By Sara Bernard What should we teach kids about computers in 2011? Most already know how to use them. “The most interesting thing we can teach kids about computers is how to program them,” says Matthew MacLaurin, UX Director of Microsoft FUSE Labs and one of the originators of Kodu, a free, downloadable software that […]

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Video Games Are Good For Us. Really!

Video Games Are Good For Us. Really!

| December 20, 2010 | 0 Comments

Improved vision, more focused attention, more efficient multi-tasking, and improved spatial cognition are just a few of the benefits of playing video games. “The non-gamers had to think a lot more and use a lot more of the workhorse parts of their brains for eye-hand coordination. Whereas the gamers really didn’t have to use that […]

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Step One: Start With What Kids Want

Step One: Start With What Kids Want

| December 7, 2010 | 1 Comment

“If they give a damn about what they’re reading, they’ll persist in the face of challenges.” – Constance Steinkhueler at Big Ideas Fest. Steinkuehler is an educational researcher studying how online games can build literacy skills. In her most recent experiment she learned that “we had to shift from using games as a means for […]

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(Video) Game on? Yes and No.

(Video) Game on? Yes and No.

| October 11, 2010 | 0 Comments

Leslie Rule is studying at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Technology, Innovation, and Education (TIE) program. She specializes in hands-on, in-depth, project-based workshops using geo-apps, mobile devices, and storytelling techniques to explore place and community. By Leslie Rule I am not a gamer. Never liked board games. Pre-date the video game revolution. […]

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