Neuroscience

Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain

Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain

| July 22, 2014 | 7 Comments

Researchers in the fairly new field of music neuroscience are finding that kids who learn to play a musical instrument also develop important skills related to literacy, math and mental focus.

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Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read

| June 24, 2014 | 17 Comments

New research shows it’s possible to pick up some of the signs of dyslexia in the brain even before kids learn to read. And this earlier identification may start to substantially influence how parents, educators and clinicians tackle the disorder.

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On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes

| May 6, 2014 | 17 Comments

Scientists have come a long way in understanding how the brain generates creative ideas. Their work can inform classroom structures if educators want to inspire more creativity in students.

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Why Extra Curricular Activities Are Not Extra

Why Extra Curricular Activities Are Not Extra

| April 29, 2014 | 2 Comments

School districts have been quick to cut music and art programs when budgets get tight, focusing instead on “employable” skills like math and science. But there’s a strong body of research indicating that neglecting the arts in school puts students at a cognitive disadvantage throughout life.

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Five Research-Driven Education Trends At Work in Classrooms

Five Research-Driven Education Trends At Work in Classrooms

| October 14, 2013 | 41 Comments

Increasingly, educators are looking to research about how kids learn to influence teaching practices and tools. What seemed like on-the-fringe experiments, like game-based learning, have turned into real trends, and have gradually made their way into many (though certainly not most) classrooms.

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How Emotional Connections Can Trigger Creativity and Learning

How Emotional Connections Can Trigger Creativity and Learning

| March 15, 2013 | 19 Comments

Scientists are always uncovering new ways into how people learn best, and some of the most recent neuroscience research has shown connections between basic survival functions, social and emotional reactions to the world, and creative impulses. Students’ social and emotional reactions to learning are imperative to feeling motivated to learn and to their ability to […]

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Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying

Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying

| January 11, 2013 | 29 Comments

Getty Getting enough sleep is an under-valued but crucial part of learning. Contrary to students’ belief that staying up all night to cram for an exam will lead to higher scores, truth is, the need for a good night’s rest is even more important than finishing homework or studying for a test. A recent study […]

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What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

| April 5, 2012 | 30 Comments

Getty Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple University in Philadelphia propose that it be taught earlier, however—much earlier. As in first grade. In a study published in this month’s issue of the journal Early Education and Development, psychologists Peter […]

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Discovering How to Learn Smarter

Discovering How to Learn Smarter

| February 2, 2012 | 6 Comments

Getty By Annie Murphy Paul It’s not often that a story about the brain warms the heart. But that’s exactly what happened to me when I read an article last month in the Washington Post. It’s about how teachers in many schools in the D.C. area are foregoing empty praise of the “Good job!” variety, […]

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Scratching that (Incessant) Technology Itch

Scratching that (Incessant) Technology Itch

| November 16, 2011 | 0 Comments

Lenny Gonzales Our love-hate relationship with technology is the subject of research psychologist Dr. Larry D. Rosen’s new book iDisorder. From his perspective, “tech gadgets and applications are turning us into basket-cases suffering from versions of obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit syndrome,” according to a recent HechingerEd blog. Rosen also spoke at last year’s Learning & […]

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