inquiry learning

How to Teach the Standards Without Becoming Standardized

How to Teach the Standards Without Becoming Standardized

| March 12, 2014 | 13 Comments

Teaching standards doesn’t necessitate a standardized approach to teaching. Teachers share ideas for providing a standards-based, but authentic learning experience for all students.

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Can University Professors Benefit from K-12 Progressive Teaching Tactics?

Can University Professors Benefit from K-12 Progressive Teaching Tactics?

| March 10, 2014 | 9 Comments

Some university teaching practices are held sacred, but perhaps college professors can learn from progressive teaching tactics of K-12 classrooms.

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What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School?

What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School?

| February 21, 2014 | 51 Comments

Setting aside the two predominant narratives of education, there’s a third vision taking shape that’s yet to be defined. What would a reimagined education system value and teach?

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Wish List: Piecing Together an Ideal School From the Ground Up

Wish List: Piecing Together an Ideal School From the Ground Up

| February 5, 2014 | 8 Comments

Three educators went on a year-long journey to discover what makes a great school. These are the imperatives they’ve applied to creating their own school.

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Math and Inquiry: The Importance of Letting Students Stumble

Math and Inquiry: The Importance of Letting Students Stumble

| February 3, 2014 | 10 Comments

For subjects like math and foreign language, which are traditionally taught in a linear and highly structured context, using more open-ended inquiry-based models can be challenging. But inquiry learning is based on the premise that, with a little bit of structure and guidance, teachers can support students to ask questions that lead them to learn those same important skills — in ways that are meaningful to them.

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How the Heck Do You Implement “Student Empowerment”?

How the Heck Do You Implement “Student Empowerment”?

| January 13, 2014 | 16 Comments

Most classrooms follow a prescribed formula. Teachers plan and lay out what is going to be learned. Students come into class and have the responsibility of switching themselves into “ready” mode, waiting for the teacher to instruct and guide them in the day’s tasks. Surely there are parts of the learning process where the control could be shifted to the students – where teachers can hand them responsibility and freedom and give them a voice in what they would learn.

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How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning

| January 7, 2014 | 20 Comments

The opportunity to extend access to technology in the classroom and at home is enticing, but school districts can get hung up on important details like providing a strong network, making sure each child has a device, and questions about around distraction. Of course, no one answer will work for all teachers or students, but one guiding principle that’s shown to work is for schools to focus on how mobile technology will help shift instruction to be more collaborative, learner-driven and inquiry-based.

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2013 Big Ideas in Education

2013 Big Ideas in Education

| December 18, 2013 | 27 Comments

A look through the most popular MindShift posts this year reveals a strong interest in student-directed learning, inquiry-based approaches to teaching and the desire to help students learn how to learn in a changing world.

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Ready to Ignite Students’ Curiosity? Here’s Your Toolkit

Ready to Ignite Students’ Curiosity? Here’s Your Toolkit

| December 11, 2013 | 3 Comments

Created by Dr. Sugata Mitra, this step-by-step guide will help teachers and parents ignite kids’ curiosity and learn about the world through self-discovery, sharing, and spontaneity.

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Dive Into Science With Zombies, Superheroes, and Fairies

Dive Into Science With Zombies, Superheroes, and Fairies

| November 27, 2013 | 5 Comments

Sometimes, being thrown into a new situation with few resources and little knowledge can be the best way to innovate. Educators, especially those who work in smaller rural districts, can sometimes be called on to teach classes without a lot of support or resources. While those moments can be terrifying, it’s also a good time to step back from the anxious swirl of curriculum and standards to think like a kid. What would they love? Zombies, superheroes, and fairies, of course!

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