inquiry learning

This Is What a Student-Designed School Looks Like

This Is What a Student-Designed School Looks Like

| July 14, 2014 | 70 Comments

The Independent Project is a result of a high school student’s mission to create a school where students would feel fully engaged, have an opportunity to develop expertise in something, and learn how to learn.

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What Makes an ‘Extreme Learner’?

What Makes an ‘Extreme Learner’?

| July 8, 2014 | 20 Comments

It’s the hunger for learning rather than raw intellect that distinguishes Extreme Learners from the gifted. Intensely motivated and harboring a breadth of interests, they also consider ignorance a temporary and reparable condition.

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One Size Does Not Fit All: The Need for Variety in Learning

One Size Does Not Fit All: The Need for Variety in Learning

| March 27, 2014 | 11 Comments

When you want to improve your physical health, you don’t have to eat one specific type of food or exercise in a specific way. Rather, you need an appropriate mix of healthy foods and exercise — no one thing is required. Different types of exercise and foods are in some sense interchangeable. What matters is that you get the appropriate dose. Could this common idea from health translate into the world of education?

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How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful

How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful

| March 24, 2014 | 22 Comments

Project-based learning continues to be misinterpreted as a single teaching strategy rather than as a set of design principles that allow us to introduce the philosophy of inquiry into education in an intelligent and grounded way. It’s time to not only address the flaws in PBL, but to reinvent it in a way that leads to deeper learning, creative inquiry, and a better fit with a collaborative world in which doing and knowing are one thing.

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How to Teach the Standards Without Becoming Standardized

How to Teach the Standards Without Becoming Standardized

| March 12, 2014 | 13 Comments

Teaching standards doesn’t necessitate a standardized approach to teaching. Teachers share ideas for providing a standards-based, but authentic learning experience for all students.

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Can University Professors Benefit from K-12 Progressive Teaching Tactics?

Can University Professors Benefit from K-12 Progressive Teaching Tactics?

| March 10, 2014 | 7 Comments

Some university teaching practices are held sacred, but perhaps college professors can learn from progressive teaching tactics of K-12 classrooms.

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What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School?

What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School?

| February 21, 2014 | 33 Comments

Setting aside the two predominant narratives of education, there’s a third vision taking shape that’s yet to be defined. What would a reimagined education system value and teach?

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Wish List: Piecing Together an Ideal School From the Ground Up

Wish List: Piecing Together an Ideal School From the Ground Up

| February 5, 2014 | 7 Comments

Three educators went on a year-long journey to discover what makes a great school. These are the imperatives they’ve applied to creating their own school.

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Math and Inquiry: The Importance of Letting Students Stumble

Math and Inquiry: The Importance of Letting Students Stumble

| February 3, 2014 | 10 Comments

For subjects like math and foreign language, which are traditionally taught in a linear and highly structured context, using more open-ended inquiry-based models can be challenging. But inquiry learning is based on the premise that, with a little bit of structure and guidance, teachers can support students to ask questions that lead them to learn those same important skills — in ways that are meaningful to them.

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How the Heck Do You Implement “Student Empowerment”?

How the Heck Do You Implement “Student Empowerment”?

| January 13, 2014 | 15 Comments

Most classrooms follow a prescribed formula. Teachers plan and lay out what is going to be learned. Students come into class and have the responsibility of switching themselves into “ready” mode, waiting for the teacher to instruct and guide them in the day’s tasks. Surely there are parts of the learning process where the control could be shifted to the students – where teachers can hand them responsibility and freedom and give them a voice in what they would learn.

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