Failure

Instead of Framing ‘Failure’ As a Positive, Why Not Just Use Positive Words?

Instead of Framing ‘Failure’ As a Positive, Why Not Just Use Positive Words?

| May 28, 2014 | 34 Comments

The importance of positive language within how society conceptualizes learning is evident for the growth of student potential and learning.

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What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets

What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets

| March 25, 2014 | 15 Comments

Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindsets has dominated much of the attention around how students can influence their own learning. But there are other ways to help students tap into their own motivation, too. Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.

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Can Focus On ‘Grit’ Work In School Cultures That Reward Grades?

Can Focus On ‘Grit’ Work In School Cultures That Reward Grades?

| March 17, 2014

Education circles are abuzz with a new concept: that resilience and persistence are just as important as intelligence to predicting student success and achievement. But can “grit” actually be taught?

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Bigger Gains for Students Who Don’t Get Help Solving Problems

Bigger Gains for Students Who Don’t Get Help Solving Problems

| February 25, 2014 | 27 Comments

Allowing learners to struggle will actually help them learn better, according to research on “productive failure” conducted by Manu Kapur, a researcher at the Learning Sciences Lab at the National Institute of Education of Singapore.

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Inventor to Schools: ‘Let Kids Fail!’

Inventor to Schools: ‘Let Kids Fail!’

| February 8, 2014 | 2 Comments

We’ve heard the importance of failure and experimentation in learning. In this excellent interview on Science Friday, inventor James Dyson speaks about his direct experience with failures and schools’ need to accommodate it. “My life and my day are full of failures,” he says. “Failures are interesting.”

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Making Mistakes: Why They’re Crucial for Learning

Making Mistakes: Why They’re Crucial for Learning

| August 25, 2013

We try so hard to be perfect, to never make mistakes and to avoid failure at all costs. But mistakes happen — and when they do — how do we deal with being wrong? In this episode, TED speakers look at those difficult moments in our lives, and consider why sometimes we need to make mistakes and face them head-on.

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Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick

| April 24, 2013 | 70 Comments

Carol Dweck’s research, which focuses on what makes people seek challenging tasks, persist through difficulty and do well over time, has shown that many girls believe their abilities are fixed, that individuals are born with gifts and can’t change.

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How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World?

How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World?

| January 9, 2013 | 20 Comments

Educators are always striving to find ways to make curriculum relevant in students’ everyday lives. More and more teachers are using social media around lessons, allowing students to use their cell phones to do research and participate in class, and developing their curriculum around projects to ground learning around an activity. These strategies are all […]

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Beyond Talent and Smarts: Why Even Geniuses Struggle

Beyond Talent and Smarts: Why Even Geniuses Struggle

| November 23, 2012 | 11 Comments

Flickr:Bunchesandbits “The struggle with writing is over.” That message, written on a Post-It note and affixed to his computer, brings the novelist Philip Roth great relief and contentment these days, according to a profile published earlier this week in the New York Times. At the age of 79, the author of more than 31 acclaimed […]

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Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures

Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures

| November 15, 2012 | 59 Comments

In Japanese classrooms, teachers consciously design tasks that are slightly beyond the capabilities of the students they teach, so the students can actually experience struggling with something just outside their reach.

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