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Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence

Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence

| June 10, 2013 | 11 Comments

The science of learning can offer some surprising and useful perspectives on how we guide and educate young people. Things like our perception of “smart,” relationships between students and educators, sleep, and use of technology can have profound effects on intelligence.

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The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

| June 3, 2013 | 13 Comments

The deep reading of books and the information-driven reading we do on the web are very different, both in the experience they produce and in the capacities they develop. Recent research has demonstrated that deep reading—slow, immersive, rich in sensory detail and emotional and moral complexity—is a distinctive experience, different in kind from the mere decoding of words.

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What Do We Actually Learn From Videos?

What Do We Actually Learn From Videos?

| May 28, 2013 | 4 Comments

TED talkers are nothing if not fluent. Could it be that the effective presentation of the speakers in TED-style videos fools us into thinking we’re learning more than we are? Here, five ways that well-made videos (including MOOCs and other kinds of digital instruction) can help us learn.

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How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn?

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn?

Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might be more difficult because of it. Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their “study observation forms,” […]

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How to (Once and For All) Correct Mistaken Beliefs

How to (Once and For All) Correct Mistaken Beliefs

| April 22, 2013 | 2 Comments

“Often mistaken, never in doubt.” That wry phrase describes us all more than we’d like to admit. The psychological study of misconceptions shows that all of us possess many beliefs that are flawed or flat-out wrong—and also that we cling to these fallacies with remarkable tenacity. Although much of this research concerns misguided notions of […]

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How to Stimulate Curiosity

How to Stimulate Curiosity

| April 8, 2013 | 5 Comments

Curiosity is the engine of intellectual achievement—it’s what drives us to keep learning, keep trying, keep pushing forward. But how does one generate curiosity, in oneself or others? George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University, proposed an answer in a classic 1994 paper, “The Psychology of Curiosity.” Curiosity arises, Loewenstein […]

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Why Confusion Can Be a Good Thing

Why Confusion Can Be a Good Thing

| February 18, 2013 | 11 Comments

We all know that confusion doesn’t feel good. Because it seems like an obstacle to learning, we try to arrange educational experiences and training sessions so that learners will encounter as little confusion as possible. But as is so often the case when it comes to learning, our intuitions here are exactly wrong. Scientists have […]

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Anxious About Tests? Tips to Ease Angst

Anxious About Tests? Tips to Ease Angst

| February 8, 2013 | 3 Comments

As any parent or teacher knows, tests can create crippling anxiety in students–and anxious kids can perform below their true abilities. But new research in cognitive science and psychology is giving us a clearer understanding of the link between stress and performance, and allowing experts to develop specific strategies for helping kids manage their fears. […]

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Here Comes 2013: The Big Themes in Learning

Here Comes 2013: The Big Themes in Learning

| January 4, 2013 | 29 Comments

Getty Here are three big stories concerning education and learning that you’ll be hearing about in the year ahead—and some pointers on how to think about them. 1. SMART USE OF TECH. Computers have been present in classrooms for a number of years now, of course, and in 2013 excitement about their potential to transform […]

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Beyond Talent and Smarts: Why Even Geniuses Struggle

Beyond Talent and Smarts: Why Even Geniuses Struggle

| November 23, 2012 | 7 Comments

Flickr:Bunchesandbits “The struggle with writing is over.” That message, written on a Post-It note and affixed to his computer, brings the novelist Philip Roth great relief and contentment these days, according to a profile published earlier this week in the New York Times. At the age of 79, the author of more than 31 acclaimed […]

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