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What Are the Risks in Using Data to Predict Student Outcome?

What Are the Risks in Using Data to Predict Student Outcome?

| August 6, 2013 | 7 Comments

Clever tools can even allow us to measure and monitor our own progress. Newly awash in data, the question becomes: What do we do with this information?

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Can Playing Video Games Give Girls an Edge In Math?

Can Playing Video Games Give Girls an Edge In Math?

| July 24, 2013 | 23 Comments

Playing an action video game “can virtually eliminate” the gender difference in a basic capacity researchers call spatial attention, while at the same time reducing the gender difference in the ability to mentally rotate objects, a higher-level spatial skill.

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Why Teaching Helps Students Learn More Deeply

Why Teaching Helps Students Learn More Deeply

| July 2, 2013 | 8 Comments

For thousands of years, people have known that the best way to understand a concept is to explain it to someone else. “While we teach, we learn,” said the Roman philosopher Seneca. Now scientists are bringing this ancient wisdom up to date, documenting exactly why teaching is such a fruitful way to learn — and designing innovative ways for young people to engage in instruction.

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Cracking a Secret Code to Learning: Hand Gestures

Cracking a Secret Code to Learning: Hand Gestures

| June 24, 2013 | 7 Comments

Research shows that the act of gesturing itself seems to accelerate learning, bringing nascent knowledge into consciousness and aiding the understanding of new concepts.

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Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence

Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence

| June 10, 2013 | 11 Comments

The science of learning can offer some surprising and useful perspectives on how we guide and educate young people. Things like our perception of “smart,” relationships between students and educators, sleep, and use of technology can have profound effects on intelligence.

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The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

| June 3, 2013 | 15 Comments

The deep reading of books and the information-driven reading we do on the web are very different, both in the experience they produce and in the capacities they develop. Recent research has demonstrated that deep reading—slow, immersive, rich in sensory detail and emotional and moral complexity—is a distinctive experience, different in kind from the mere decoding of words.

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What Do We Actually Learn From Videos?

What Do We Actually Learn From Videos?

| May 28, 2013 | 4 Comments

TED talkers are nothing if not fluent. Could it be that the effective presentation of the speakers in TED-style videos fools us into thinking we’re learning more than we are? Here, five ways that well-made videos (including MOOCs and other kinds of digital instruction) can help us learn.

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How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn?

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn?

Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might be more difficult because of it. Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their “study observation forms,” […]

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How to (Once and For All) Correct Mistaken Beliefs

How to (Once and For All) Correct Mistaken Beliefs

| April 22, 2013 | 3 Comments

“Often mistaken, never in doubt.” That wry phrase describes us all more than we’d like to admit. The psychological study of misconceptions shows that all of us possess many beliefs that are flawed or flat-out wrong—and also that we cling to these fallacies with remarkable tenacity. Although much of this research concerns misguided notions of […]

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How to Stimulate Curiosity

How to Stimulate Curiosity

| April 8, 2013 | 9 Comments

Curiosity is the engine of intellectual achievement—it’s what drives us to keep learning, keep trying, keep pushing forward. But how does one generate curiosity, in oneself or others? George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University, proposed an answer in a classic 1994 paper, “The Psychology of Curiosity.” Curiosity arises, Loewenstein […]

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