Adam Savage: Permission to Make

| May 24, 2012 | 5 Comments
  • Email Post

MythBusters host Adam Savage has a thing or two to say about the importance of tinkering — even if that means it gets messy.

“If you don’t get a chance to fail, if you don’t get a chance to try things and not get them right the first time, and you keep on doing it until you do get that specific kind of success, then you become so risk-averse that you in fact get an allergy to trying new things. And that is the worst thing we can do to kids.”

At Maker Faire last weekend, Savage spoke about how the “maker culture” is the engine that will fuel kids’ love for — and excelling in — math and science.

Here’s to that maker spirit!

[Produced by Joanne Elgart Jennings and Matthew Williams. Photos in the video by Patrick Giblin.]

Related

Explore: , , , ,

  • Email Post
  • Faustbite

    I think you misquoted Savage in your text.

    He actually says, making the analogy between Hygeine Hypothesis and the development of physical allergies, that there’s a mental equivalent. The line is that kids “…become so risk-averse that you IN EFFECT get an allergy to trying new things.” Quite different from saying it “in fact” happens.

    • Shillelaghwest

      While it does affect the literal meaning, the intent of the statement remains the same, imho.

  • http://www.intrinsicstrategy.com/ FrankCatalano

    I’d add the early days of personal computers — the late 1970s and 1980s — also saw a huge amount of tinkering. You don’t need to go back to the early days of automobiles. Both cars and computers went from enthusiast audiences to mass audiences once they were properly “packaged.”

    This era was before computers were closed boxes: the Apple //e, specifically, was designed to be quickly snapped open and modified, and many modifications were also made by tinkerers to the Commodore and Atari computers. These are the true precursors to electronic maker culture. Now, it happens the computers are parts themselves, not just something to be modified and extended.

  • http://www.intrinsicstrategy.com/ FrankCatalano

    I’d add the early days of personal computers — the late 1970s and 1980s — also saw a huge amount of tinkering. You don’t need to go back to the early days of automobiles. Both cars and computers went from enthusiast audiences to mass audiences once they were properly “packaged.”

    This era was before computers were closed boxes: the Apple //e, specifically, was designed to be quickly snapped open and modified, and many modifications were also made by tinkerers to the Commodore and Atari computers. These are the true precursors to electronic maker culture. Now, it happens the computers are parts themselves, not just something to be modified and extended.

  • Pingback: Milarepa's musings » Blog Archive » Play’s the thing – part one