Monthly Archives: March 2012

What’s A Park Worth?

INCLUDES: ARTICLE; KQED AUDIO CLIPS

Natural-Bridges State Beach, near Santa Cruz (credit: Ca. Dept. of Parks and Recreation)

“These state parks are our cathedrals. This is what defines us as Californians to the rest of the world.  But they are not cheap to run. And so I think Californians need to decide whether it’s worth it to them to save these parks … I think it begs a much deeper question of what we value as Californians.
- Ruth Coleman, California state parks director

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A (mini) Guide to California’s Parks

INCLUDES: INTERACTIVE MAPS AND KQED MULTIMEDIA LINKS

Click on the photo to explore KQED's radio and interactive series on California's parks.

California has a lot of state parks. 278 to be exact – more than any other state in the U.S. Some are tiny specks on the map – mini historic sites that you may have driven by without even noticing. Others are vast swaths of land – thousands of preserved acres of old growth forest, sweeping vistas, pristine beaches. Size and stature aside, each has it’s own significance, and the majority were spearheaded as a result of citizen-led campaigns to make the land public and accessible to anyone who wanted to visit. Continue reading

The Evolution of California’s State Parks

INCLUDES: INTERACTIVE TIMELINE

Credit: E. Howe/Flickr

In 2010, California voters rejected Proposition 21, which would have added an $18 annual surcharge to vehicle license fees and raised about $500 million annually to fund state park and wildlife conservation programs. Now, without the funding, nearly a quarter of the entire system’s sites – almost 70 parks – are in danger of being closed down. During difficult economic times, it’s no surprise that public resources like state parks are given low priority, especially compared to more urgent services like public safety. Continue reading

Why Facebook Is Going Public (and how it made one graffiti artist rich)

INCLUDES: ARTICLE; KQED AUDIO; PBS NEWSHOUR VIDEO

Facebook CEO announces his company's plan to go public (credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

When Facebook filed for an Initial Public Offering (IPO) in February, Mark Zuckerberg wrote a public letter outlining Facebook’s mission: to bring the world closer together. With the additional investment money that an IPO would bring, he explained, Facebook would have the resources to better reach that goal.
Or, to put it another way, when Facebook goes public, it stands to make a whole lot of money. IPO’s can be a good way for companies
to have access to a lot of funding fast, Continue reading

IPOs, Investments, and Stocks, Oh My! Explaining the Business of Business

INCLUDES: ARTICLE AND KQED AUDIO; INVESTOPEDIA VIDEO

Credit: Scott Beale / Laughing Squid

Since 2004, when Mark Zuckerberg launched the first version of Facebook from his college dorm room, the company has been privately-owned. That means that only a handful of people – Zuckerberg,  a bunch of his early co-workers, and a few private investment firms – owned shares (parts) in the company. This February, though, Facebook announced it was going “public,” which opens the door for outside investors to start thinking about buying into it. Continue reading