Voice of a Young Voter: How Much is Too Much National Security?

An estimated 46 million eligible voters in this year’s election are between 18 and 29 years old – part of the Millennial generation. Will those young voters sway the election? What issues do young people feel are important? What role do they think government should play in their lives?

KQED and three other public media organizations on the West Coast are exploring those questions in a series called “Voices of Young Voters.” We fanned out to college campuses around the Bay Area to hear from those who are just coming of age politically.

Tatiana McBraun

Young voters have a unique perspective on national security. Those younger than 30 were children or teenagers on Sept. 11 and grew up hearing about terrorist threats. But Tatiana McBraun, a political science major at San Jose State, recently told KQED’s Lillian Mongeau she feels too much security can be a bad thing.

McBraun also discussed her religion, and noted that while she and Republican challenger Mitt Romney are both Mormon, it doesn’t mean he has her vote.

I think (the candidates) place too much importance on security. They’re always collecting information from us and I don’t know why. For example, going to the airport and not wanting to go through the screening process, and then oh, I’m a bad person because I don’t support security.

I just wish we had a little more freedom as citizens because I feel like slowly but surely our liberties are kind of being taken away from us.

I’m Mormon and a lot of people think that just because you’re Mormon, you’re going to vote for a Mormon president, but I don’t necessarily feel that he is the best of the two candidates.

When I think about Romney and I think about international relations, I couldn’t picture him going overseas and conducting business with them and them relating to him. So, I’m going to go for Barack Obama Because…I still believe that he can make changes slowly but surely.

Click play on the audio clip below to hear Tatiana McBraun.

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    “Young voters have a unique perspective on national security. Those
    younger than 30 were children or teenagers on Sept. 11 and grew up
    hearing about terrorist threats.” (kqednews, 2012).
    I find that statement quite hilarious. I’m at 30 years of age right now, and I was 17 years old when 9/11 occurred. Watched it on live television while I was in my 4th period (high school). I guess, according to the statement above, I was not a teenager at that time! lol. How absurd.