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Tag: career

The American Dream: How it Relates to Students Today

Civics in the Community | May 18, 2015 | 4 Comments

The American Dream: How it Relates to Students Today

The American Dream: having a well-paying job, a house with a fence, marriage, children, and maybe a dog. For many millenials, their goals don’t exactly line up with the good ol’ American Dream. Read what students have to say about defining their own “American Dream.”

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How Does the American Dream Relate to You?

Do Now | May 1, 2015 | 95 Comments

How Does the American Dream Relate to You?

Not too many years ago, the “American dream” seemed to be a pretty uniform vision: landing a well-paying job, owning your own home and filling it with cool stuff, maybe even having a family and sending your kids to good schools and colleges. How do you personally define the “American dream?”

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What’s the Value of Graduating High School Versus Earning a GED?

Do Now | April 3, 2015 | 96 Comments

What’s the Value of Graduating High School Versus Earning a GED?

Would you consider earning a high school equivalency certification instead of a high school diploma? What, if anything, does the high school experience offers versus the potential “shortcut” of a GED? How well does high school fit your learning needs?

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College Needs to be More Affordable

Do Now Round-Ups | December 16, 2013 | 0 Comments

College Needs to be More Affordable

Is college still worth the cost? Last week, students across the nation debated the benefits of going to college, particularly based on the current economy in our #DoNowCollege post. We asked students Given how much college costs, how much debt most students have after graduation, and how hard it is to get a good job in this economy, is college really worth it?

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Is College Worth the Cost?

Do Now | November 30, 2013 | 79 Comments

Is College Worth the Cost?

In 2013, nearly 20 million students in the United States were enrolled in colleges and universities, more than any other time in the country’s history. Compare that to sixty years ago, when higher education enrollment rates were still under 3 million.

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