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Andrea Aust

Andrea is the Science Education Manager for KQED. She joined KQED in 2007 to coordinate education and outreach for the public television series Jean-Michel Cousteau: Ocean Adventures. Between working on Ocean Adventures and joining the QUEST team, she developed the educational resources for the 4-hour documentary Saving the Bay. Andrea graduated from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in Environmental Science and earned her M.A. in Teaching and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from the University of San Francisco. Before arriving at KQED, she taught, developed, and managed marine science and environmental education programs in Aspen, Catalina Island and the Bay Area.

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Andrea Aust's Latest Posts

What Would You Study About the Ocean?

Do Now | August 25, 2015 | 0 Comments

What Would You Study About the Ocean?

The health of our oceans impacts all of us, whether we live near the coast or in the middle of the country. If you were to study an issue related to marine ecosystems or ocean science, what would it be?

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E-book: Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep

Science | July 23, 2015

E-book: Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep

The new, media-rich e-book from QUEST, Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep, explores the story of how Academy scientists designed a portable decompression chamber in order to safely transport fish discovered on their expeditions to the Philippines.

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E-book: Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes

Science | July 22, 2015

E-book: Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes

The new, media-rich e-book from QUEST, Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes, tells the story of how Stanford University bioengineer Manu Prakash and his colleagues designed a lightweight, inexpensive, robust, paper microscope in order to help people in developing countries and remote areas diagnose diseases.

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How Would You Design a Bicycle?

6 -12 Science | July 15, 2015 | 4 Comments

How Would You Design a Bicycle?

Learning to ride a bicycle is a strong memory from many of our childhoods. How did you learn how to ride a bicycle? What would you change about how today’s bicycles are designed?

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E-book: Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes

General | May 29, 2015

E-book: Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes

Access to healthcare and diagnostic tools aren’t always easy to come by in many parts of the world. In this e-book from KQED, discover how engineers from Stanford University designed an easy-to-use, easy-to-fix, paper microscope that costs $1 to produce in order to help people in remote areas diagnose diseases.

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E-book: Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep

Science | April 2, 2015

E-book: Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep

The ocean’s mysterious twilight zone is home to a wealth of fish species, many that are new to researchers. In this e-book from KQED, discover how scientists from the California Academy of Sciences engineered a device to safely transport live fish from the twilight zone back to the Academy’s aquarium for further study.

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“Engineering Is” for the Next Generation

6 -12 Science | February 26, 2015

“Engineering Is” for the Next Generation

Explore the connections between engineering and science with KQED’s new, free e-book, Engineering Is Saving the World with Cookstoves. Learn how researchers designed a new, more efficient cookstove to improve the quality of life for families in Darfur.

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How is Waste Converted Into Energy?

Science | January 14, 2015

How is Waste Converted Into Energy?

One way to generate electricity is to burn solid waste, like the material found in landfills. Instead of a traditional landfill, a community might have a waste-to-energy facility that incinerates garbage, transforming chemical energy to thermal energy.

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How Nuclear Reactors Work

Science | January 7, 2015

How Nuclear Reactors Work

Energy sources fit into three main buckets–fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas), renewable (e.g. wind, solar, hydroelectric, geothermal, etc.) and nuclear. Nuclear energy is a nonrenewable energy resource because it relies on Earth’s uranium deposits.

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How Solar Power Works

Science | December 30, 2014

How Solar Power Works

Solar power is energy that comes from the sun. This energy can be captured and stored in many different ways. It is the ultimate source for most energy resources.

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