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Do You Learn Better Through Making?

| May 30, 2014 | 98 Comments
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To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDEdspace and end it with #DoNowMaker

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Do Now

Do you learn better through a hands on making process? Share something that you have made recently. What have you always wanted to learn to make?

Introduction

For several years now, the practice of making things has really turned into a cultural phenomenon. Referred to as Maker Culture or the DIY Movement, self-sufficiency through completing tasks without the aid of a paid expert (aka do-it-yourself), usually involving technology and online sharing has truly exploded around us, especially in the Bay Area. Why is this happening? Brit Morin, Founder and CEO of Brit + Co., jabs at the origins of this revival in a recent Huff Post article claiming that, “most people my age (AKA millennials) probably had two busy, working parents while growing up (and therefore likely did not get a deep education on many of these skills) and you’ll realize why we are all now flocking to do-it-yourself (DIY) websites and apps that will teach us the cooking, crafting and making skills that many of us missed out on in our youth and which now are so important as we build homes and start families.”

In her article, Morin goes into a more extensive definition of “DIY” or “Maker,” identifying its relationship to “how-to” content, including things like “how to change a tire.” Over the past couple of years, though, it’s been used more broadly to describe any activity that incorporates creative skills to make or design something on your own. Using this definition, DIY can stand for everything from baking a cake, to decorating a bedroom, to creating handmade products like jewelry. Some also use DIY in a more technical context as it relates to making gadgets like robots, printers and other programmable devices hacked together using free software and tools found across the web.

Maker culture is now shifting into the education arena where instructors are implementing project-based and self-directed learning models for students to problem solve and discover learning moments throughout their inquiry process. Gever Tulley founded Tinkering School in 2005 in order to learn how children become competent and to explore the notion that kids can build anything, and through building, learn anything.

Dale Dougherty, founding editor and publisher of Make Magazine — and the de factor leader of the Maker Movement — has a vision to create a network of libraries, museums, and schools with what he calls “makerspaces” that draw on common resources and experts in each community. Libraries and museums, he said, are easier places to incorporate makerspaces than schools, because they have more space flexibility and they’re trying to attract teens with their programs.

As the influence in maker culture seeps into education and learning, there has also been debate as to whether this cultural shift can become more prominent in formal educational institutions. Audrey Waters from Hack Education writes that “The Maker Movement also reflects the technological, political, and economic zeitgeist: the need for a technologically skilled work force, hope for a revival of American manufacturing, concern about STEM education all the while cutting many of the programs in schools that foster these skills — arts, wood shop, metal shop, computer science — to make more room for more standardized testing.”

There is no doubt that “maker” is making headway, but the growing skepticism around its role in formal education due to lack of resources and emphasis on testing is called into question. Can schools embrace a maker movement?

Resource

KQED MindShift video Adam Savage: Permission to Make – May 24, 2012
MythBusters host Adam Savage has a thing or two to say about the importance of tinkering — even if that means it gets messy. “If you don’t get a chance to fail, if you don’t get a chance to try things and not get them right the first time, and you keep on doing it until you do get that specific kind of success, then you become so risk-averse that you in fact get an allergy to trying new things. And that is the worst thing we can do to kids.”


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDedspace and end it with #DoNowMaker

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.

We encourage students to reply to other people’s tweets to foster more of a conversation. Also, if students tweet their personal opinions, ask them to support their ideas with links to interesting/credible articles online (adding a nice research component) or retweet other people’s ideas that they agree/disagree/find amusing. We also value student-produced media linked to their tweets like memes or more extensive blog posts to represent their ideas. Of course, do as you can… and any contribution is most welcomed.


More Resources

PBS NewsHour post New York City’s Maker Faire Delivers Dazzling Colors, Wacky Inventions
A multi-functional unicorn shoots fire from its horn while sneezing glitter. A six-person ensemble plays instruments made of saw blades, propane tanks, automotive parts, and simple household objects. Cars shaped like cupcakes made of reused electric-car parts and encased in hand-bent aluminum tins circle festival goers.

PBS NewsHour video Can DIY Movement Fix a Crisis in U.S. Science Education?
Miles O’Brien reports from a gathering in California on a growing movement that embraces the art of making cool things and a quirky do-it-yourself spirit. Supporters see “making” as one way to overcome a crisis in American science and math education.

Nirvan Mullick’s Caine’s Arcade
A 9 year old boy who built an elaborate cardboard arcade in his dad’s used auto parts store is about to have the best day of his life. Help Caine’s Scholarship Fund: http://CainesArcade.com This movie inspired a movement of cardboard & creativity in kids around the world. Join our Imagination Foundation & Global Cardboard Challenge: http://imagination.is

DIY presents Lego stop motion
DIY is a community for kids to share what they do, learn new skills and meet others with the same interests. Nyancat123, a DIY user, made this stop motion video to complete a challenge for the Animator skill.


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Category: Do Now, Do Now: Government and Civics

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About the Author ()

Matthew Williams is a filmmaker and media educator who has recently transplanted to Oakland from Los Angeles. He believes that you are what you eat and feels everyone should have a multitude of dietary options for self-realization. Matthew is the Educational Technologist at KQED.
  • shanda wang

    In the past, people cannot realize that how important the electricity to us because of the time is different. It’s the oil time in the past. But now, we cannot live without cars. The same way to the computer to our life. People must realize that they want it, it’s wonderful and good for their life. After that, people will begin to think about making it by themselves. I do learn something though making. It helps us live better, also improve our brain to build something. It’s great!

  • shanda wang

    In the past, people cannot realize that how important the electricity to us because of the time is different. It’s the oil time in the past. But now, we cannot live without cars. The same way to the computer to our life. People must realize that they want it, it’s wonderful and good for their life. After that, people will begin to think about making it by themselves. I do learn something though making. It helps us live better, also improve our brain to build something. It’s great!

  • http://www.designyourowncar.org/automotive-design-schools/ Andrew L

    As an educator, students are more engaged when they are creating their own things and taking on projects. Hands-on, project-based, and DIY is strategy against the ADD and smartphone-obsessed kids that are extremely prevalent.

  • http://www.designyourowncar.org/automotive-design-schools/ Andrew L

    As an educator, students are more engaged when they are creating their own things and taking on projects. Hands-on, project-based, and DIY is strategy against the ADD and smartphone-obsessed kids that are extremely prevalent.

  • J_Corona

    People have always said that learning is a lot easier when it come to hands-on experience, and i can definitely believe that is true. I personally enjoy making things, because a) it helps me understand what makes them tick, and b) i can save money. However, not everyone has the know-how to make certain things, or the ability to pick things up. Hands-on isn’t for everyone, and I think that if schools do embrace a hands-on learning style, it shouldn’t necessarily destroy the “learning-by-hearing/reading” method. I think there needs to be a balance.

  • J_Corona

    People have always said that learning is a lot easier when it come to hands-on experience, and i can definitely believe that is true. I personally enjoy making things, because a) it helps me understand what makes them tick, and b) i can save money. However, not everyone has the know-how to make certain things, or the ability to pick things up. Hands-on isn’t for everyone, and I think that if schools do embrace a hands-on learning style, it shouldn’t necessarily destroy the “learning-by-hearing/reading” method. I think there needs to be a balance.

  • Luca S

    I personally enjoy making things more than just reading about them. When you make things, you learn how they work inside and out. However, there should be a balance between the two. Some people don’t like hands-on projects. Some people just prefer the normal way of reading. Cars are a great example. If we just read about cars, we wouldn’t know as much about them. If we built a car, we would know exactly how it works.

  • Luca S

    I personally enjoy making things more than just reading about them. When you make things, you learn how they work inside and out. However, there should be a balance between the two. Some people don’t like hands-on projects. Some people just prefer the normal way of reading. Cars are a great example. If we just read about cars, we wouldn’t know as much about them. If we built a car, we would know exactly how it works.

  • Ellie Teare

    Personally, I prefer learning by making because I feel like it helps me understand why and how things happen and I feel like when I just sit in the classroom and take notes, I don’t absorb as much information. I think a hands-on learning environment is a really great way to teach and it could make a lot more people excited about learning. I do, however understand that hands-on learning is not the best way to learn for everyone, but for people like me who like to be doing things rather than sitting and writing, it can be very helpful.

  • Ellie Teare

    Personally, I prefer learning by making because I feel like it helps me understand why and how things happen and I feel like when I just sit in the classroom and take notes, I don’t absorb as much information. I think a hands-on learning environment is a really great way to teach and it could make a lot more people excited about learning. I do, however understand that hands-on learning is not the best way to learn for everyone, but for people like me who like to be doing things rather than sitting and writing, it can be very helpful.

  • Mr. Jueves

    I agree with Adam Savage. I think that learning is all about making., i attended the Bay Area Maker Faire this year and last year, and I learnt so much about 3-D Printing, arduino hacks, Tesla coils, the Raspberry Pi, and tons of other useful nuggets of knowledge. My friend and I are Building a Quadracopter with an integrated arduino that allows it to fly with an iPhone. iPad, a remote controller, or a computer. Plus, we even hooked up a GoPro to give us a live feed. I have learnt a priceless amount About the drivers and how everything works. This just goes to show what can Learnt through the power of making

  • Mr. Jueves

    I agree with Adam Savage. I think that learning is all about making., i attended the Bay Area Maker Faire this year and last year, and I learnt so much about 3-D Printing, arduino hacks, Tesla coils, the Raspberry Pi, and tons of other useful nuggets of knowledge. My friend and I are Building a Quadracopter with an integrated arduino that allows it to fly with an iPhone. iPad, a remote controller, or a computer. Plus, we even hooked up a GoPro to give us a live feed. I have learnt a priceless amount About the drivers and how everything works. This just goes to show what can Learnt through the power of making

  • Winnie

    I really believe that people will learn more during a hands-on experiences. I would do a science lab experiment rather than sit in class and listen to a teacher talk for several hours. Personally, I really enjoy doing DIYs especially if there’s a friends hangout day rather than going to the store and buying really expensive accessories. I think hands-on experiences at school would really increase the students’ interest in learning math, science, etc. And also, the Maker Faire is such a great event to see and learn about many different kinds of inventions.

  • Winnie

    I really believe that people will learn more during a hands-on experiences. I would do a science lab experiment rather than sit in class and listen to a teacher talk for several hours. Personally, I really enjoy doing DIYs especially if there’s a friends hangout day rather than going to the store and buying really expensive accessories. I think hands-on experiences at school would really increase the students’ interest in learning math, science, etc. And also, the Maker Faire is such a great event to see and learn about many different kinds of inventions.

  • Eli S

    The school I go to is a very project based school. For example, I am currently in the process of building a Roller Coaster for my physics class. I have also built bridges, catapults, LEGO mindstorm robots, towers, and even a life size carboard boat. I really do believe that this has helped me expand my knowledge of the subject. I am one of those people that can learn from a textbook, but things click for me much faster when I’m making something to demonstrate the concept. I think this is a very big reason why I like the sciences so much, and understand so much about them. I have several friends from other schools who don’t do these types of projects, and although they understand the lessons, I think I have a much deeper understanding of the concepts involved. Another reason why there should be more making in schools is that it gets people who don’t like what I call “textbook learning,” or don’t usually try very hard at school, and gets them excited about the subject. These are just a few of the many reasons why I think there should be more making in schools.

  • Eli S

    The school I go to is a very project based school. For example, I am currently in the process of building a Roller Coaster for my physics class. I have also built bridges, catapults, LEGO mindstorm robots, towers, and even a life size carboard boat. I really do believe that this has helped me expand my knowledge of the subject. I am one of those people that can learn from a textbook, but things click for me much faster when I’m making something to demonstrate the concept. I think this is a very big reason why I like the sciences so much, and understand so much about them. I have several friends from other schools who don’t do these types of projects, and although they understand the lessons, I think I have a much deeper understanding of the concepts involved. Another reason why there should be more making in schools is that it gets people who don’t like what I call “textbook learning,” or don’t usually try very hard at school, and gets them excited about the subject. These are just a few of the many reasons why I think there should be more making in schools.

  • Matthew C

    I believe that it all depends on the person. I enjoy making things, and I learn from creating things. Many others do as well. Others learn many different ways, such as reading, listening, etc. So the answer to this depends on the person, but yes, you can learn better through making.

  • Matthew C

    I believe that it all depends on the person. I enjoy making things, and I learn from creating things. Many others do as well. Others learn many different ways, such as reading, listening, etc. So the answer to this depends on the person, but yes, you can learn better through making.

  • Avery A.

    Coming from a project-based learning school, I can definitely say that I prefer hands on learning. Although, that is not for everyone, so I think there should always be a balance of ‘making’ and the classic textbook curriculum. A great example of this is in my Physics class, where we will be getting homework from the textbook while simultaneously working on building a new gadget. I also like that when you build something, you kind of have to figure out how it works as you make it. Building is a great alternative to textbooks because some people (like myself) have a very hard time learning from textbooks, and vice versa.

  • Avery A.

    Coming from a project-based learning school, I can definitely say that I prefer hands on learning. Although, that is not for everyone, so I think there should always be a balance of ‘making’ and the classic textbook curriculum. A great example of this is in my Physics class, where we will be getting homework from the textbook while simultaneously working on building a new gadget. I also like that when you build something, you kind of have to figure out how it works as you make it. Building is a great alternative to textbooks because some people (like myself) have a very hard time learning from textbooks, and vice versa.

  • Sophia M

    I go to a school that was designed to embrace this project based and hands on kind of learning. We are empowered to take our education into our own hands and a lot of the time that is taken quite literally and it means making something. So from personal experience, I find that this is an excellent way to explore the learning world. The only way you will ever fully understand something is if you take it apart and put it back together again.
    I have yet to meet someone that prefers digging into a textbook rather than using their own hands to discover although I know that there are those people out there. Of course there will be people that eat up information without a problem, but that can’t be everyone.
    Even looking at the origins of the human race, this idea of making things to learn makes sense. Everything that we know as a cloud of global knowledge, we learned essentially from making. Someone made something that helped them understand- even if it was a long time ago- and that was put into a textbook. So why not learn something the way that it was originally learned. Making just makes sense to me.

  • Sophia M

    I go to a school that was designed to embrace this project based and hands on kind of learning. We are empowered to take our education into our own hands and a lot of the time that is taken quite literally and it means making something. So from personal experience, I find that this is an excellent way to explore the learning world. The only way you will ever fully understand something is if you take it apart and put it back together again.
    I have yet to meet someone that prefers digging into a textbook rather than using their own hands to discover although I know that there are those people out there. Of course there will be people that eat up information without a problem, but that can’t be everyone.
    Even looking at the origins of the human race, this idea of making things to learn makes sense. Everything that we know as a cloud of global knowledge, we learned essentially from making. Someone made something that helped them understand- even if it was a long time ago- and that was put into a textbook. So why not learn something the way that it was originally learned. Making just makes sense to me.

  • bailey

    I think that hands on learning is a better way for some people to learn but not necessarily for everyone personally I would rather do hands on learning rather than sitting through a lesson and listening to a teacher talk. It’s easier for me to do it hands on and learn while I’m doing it so I can completly grasp the concept. I think its a great way for people who don’t get it just by being told to explore it alittle more and learn it for themselves.

  • bailey

    I think that hands on learning is a better way for some people to learn but not necessarily for everyone personally I would rather do hands on learning rather than sitting through a lesson and listening to a teacher talk. It’s easier for me to do it hands on and learn while I’m doing it so I can completly grasp the concept. I think its a great way for people who don’t get it just by being told to explore it alittle more and learn it for themselves.

  • Camille MacDonald

    As a student, I personally like both hands on learning and taking notes in a class room. Hearing about things in a class room and learning about them can give you a factual perspective, and hands on learning creates an experience that you can learn from. I think everyone should try things out on their own, because that’s what life’s about, but also learn from other peoples knowledge.

  • Camille MacDonald

    As a student, I personally like both hands on learning and taking notes in a class room. Hearing about things in a class room and learning about them can give you a factual perspective, and hands on learning creates an experience that you can learn from. I think everyone should try things out on their own, because that’s what life’s about, but also learn from other peoples knowledge.

  • Ellie D.

    I am totally a hands on person! I’ve been making little perler beads shapes and clay figures of anime and cartoon characters with my mom. I recently made Edd (from Ed, Edd, and Eddy) and Mabel (from Gravity Falls) for one of my friends at school. One day, I would love to make my own props for cosplaying when I go to conventions. For example, I’ve been trying to find time to make little cat claw gloves out of a broken binder and fingerless gloves.

  • Ellie D.

    I am totally a hands on person! I’ve been making little perler beads shapes and clay figures of anime and cartoon characters with my mom. I recently made Edd (from Ed, Edd, and Eddy) and Mabel (from Gravity Falls) for one of my friends at school. One day, I would love to make my own props for cosplaying when I go to conventions. For example, I’ve been trying to find time to make little cat claw gloves out of a broken binder and fingerless gloves.

  • Michael R.

    I’ve always wanted to answer a kqed segment like this one! Hands on is one of the most ideal ways to learn in this world, and I currently attend a school that relies on creativity and paced learning. The invention of the DIY movement was a good one in my opinion. Personally, hands on is actually the best way for me to learn, instead of lectures or visuals. Everyone loves to tinker!

  • Michael R.

    I’ve always wanted to answer a kqed segment like this one! Hands on is one of the most ideal ways to learn in this world, and I currently attend a school that relies on creativity and paced learning. The invention of the DIY movement was a good one in my opinion. Personally, hands on is actually the best way for me to learn, instead of lectures or visuals. Everyone loves to tinker!

  • Ameena

    I think its interesting to find creative ways to learn by making things. If a student is learning about i specific subject and is reading a text book he/she might not learn as much because he/she is bored, instead he/she could make something while having fun and might even learn more then when reading in a text book. But it also depends on the person, because he/she could get very distracted and think that it is for fun and doesn’t have to actually learn.

  • Ameena

    I think its interesting to find creative ways to learn by making things. If a student is learning about i specific subject and is reading a text book he/she might not learn as much because he/she is bored, instead he/she could make something while having fun and might even learn more then when reading in a text book. But it also depends on the person, because he/she could get very distracted and think that it is for fun and doesn’t have to actually learn.

  • Clare R

    I, personally, am definitely more of a hands-on type of person. I feel I am able to learn and understand much quicker when the physical thing is in front of me than having to create a mental image. I get bored easily, and learning from a book can be very tiresome and repetitive. But when you learn from building and making, you get to see in depth, and maybe even more than you could in textbooks. It really feels like I can fully understand the subject without it being forced. Sometimes learning from books can be better too, since you can learn more about the facts and background. So doing a mix of the two leads to a more broader understanding.

  • Clare R

    I, personally, am definitely more of a hands-on type of person. I feel I am able to learn and understand much quicker when the physical thing is in front of me than having to create a mental image. I get bored easily, and learning from a book can be very tiresome and repetitive. But when you learn from building and making, you get to see in depth, and maybe even more than you could in textbooks. It really feels like I can fully understand the subject without it being forced. Sometimes learning from books can be better too, since you can learn more about the facts and background. So doing a mix of the two leads to a more broader understanding.

  • Devin H.

    I think a balance of having the classic note-taking and learning through hands- on projects is important. These hands- on projects are important because they make learning interesting and these projects are remembered a little bit better by the students than a lecture. But, it also depends on the students as well because many of them prefer different ways to learn.

  • Devin H.

    I think a balance of having the classic note-taking and learning through hands- on projects is important. These hands- on projects are important because they make learning interesting and these projects are remembered a little bit better by the students than a lecture. But, it also depends on the students as well because many of them prefer different ways to learn.

  • Henry Zhu

    I think that project-based learning is a great way to teach students skills and concepts that they might not necessarily grasp from reading a textbook or listening to a lecture. One advantage is that projects are simply more interesting and more likely to hold a students attention than the usual method of teaching kids. Another is that making projects may teach students additional material that was not covered in the lesson. For example, currently in our Physics class we are making model roller coasters. We know that the track needs to slope downwards in order for gravity to accelerate the marble, but not necessarily how steep the slope has to be. Also, knowing the theory of something and seeing it in practice are very different experiences, so it’s helpful to have the knowledge of both.

  • Henry Zhu

    I think that project-based learning is a great way to teach students skills and concepts that they might not necessarily grasp from reading a textbook or listening to a lecture. One advantage is that projects are simply more interesting and more likely to hold a students attention than the usual method of teaching kids. Another is that making projects may teach students additional material that was not covered in the lesson. For example, currently in our Physics class we are making model roller coasters. We know that the track needs to slope downwards in order for gravity to accelerate the marble, but not necessarily how steep the slope has to be. Also, knowing the theory of something and seeing it in practice are very different experiences, so it’s helpful to have the knowledge of both.

  • Captain J. Harkness

    Creating things yourself gives you a better understanding of how things work. It also gives you an appreciation of all the work that gets put into making something. Recently I have constructed (with the help of my friends) a marble roller coaster out of wire. It’s easy to underestimate the difficulty of something like this, but once you start making one for your own, you realize engineering a roller coaster like this takes a lot of thinking, calculations (and guesswork) (and also glue), to make sure the ball does not fall off the track. Building something from your own imagination is a really good teaching process–and you don’t need a teacher to teach you anything, just your own mistakes.

  • Captain J. Harkness

    Creating things yourself gives you a better understanding of how things work. It also gives you an appreciation of all the work that gets put into making something. Recently I have constructed (with the help of my friends) a marble roller coaster out of wire. It’s easy to underestimate the difficulty of something like this, but once you start making one for your own, you realize engineering a roller coaster like this takes a lot of thinking, calculations (and guesswork) (and also glue), to make sure the ball does not fall off the track. Building something from your own imagination is a really good teaching process–and you don’t need a teacher to teach you anything, just your own mistakes.

  • Adam O

    I know that for me, project-based learning reaches me on a deeper level, and I can connect to the material much more when I am given a hands-on assignment. The best part of learning through making is the extra learning that teachers don’t necessarily assign, but the students learn through doing it themselves. If all the schools in America were do implement project based learning, they would be more fun, and effective, like my school.

  • Adam O

    I know that for me, project-based learning reaches me on a deeper level, and I can connect to the material much more when I am given a hands-on assignment. The best part of learning through making is the extra learning that teachers don’t necessarily assign, but the students learn through doing it themselves. If all the schools in America were do implement project based learning, they would be more fun, and effective, like my school.

  • Phillip Y

    As a student of a project-based learning school, I definitely think that hands-on assignments make learning easier and more fun. Students also get the opportunity to discover more things about what they’re learning and they get to express their creativity.

  • Phillip Y

    As a student of a project-based learning school, I definitely think that hands-on assignments make learning easier and more fun. Students also get the opportunity to discover more things about what they’re learning and they get to express their creativity.

  • Michael P

    Hands-on making often provides a better education rather than taking endless notes. My school focuses on project-based learning, and it gives a great sense of the topic. Students often remember more from their projects than their notebooks. Lectures can give students solid facts and are important to establish an understanding of the topic, but hands-on projects allow the students to apply their lessons to a situation. Recently my physics class created roller coasters. This allowed us students to understand how gravity, combined with certain inclines, would cause a metal ball to travel along a track. Hands-on learning is very important to solidify notes and ideas learned in classes.

  • Michael P

    Hands-on making often provides a better education rather than taking endless notes. My school focuses on project-based learning, and it gives a great sense of the topic. Students often remember more from their projects than their notebooks. Lectures can give students solid facts and are important to establish an understanding of the topic, but hands-on projects allow the students to apply their lessons to a situation. Recently my physics class created roller coasters. This allowed us students to understand how gravity, combined with certain inclines, would cause a metal ball to travel along a track. Hands-on learning is very important to solidify notes and ideas learned in classes.

  • Jake Ng

    Coming from a school that is pretty much founded on hands on experience, I believe that it is a great way of teaching. Siting in a class everyday and reading a text book about something is really an old and boring way of teaching. Sure you’ve read about it, but actually getting to see and feel what your learning about is what makes it such a powerful way of teaching. It impacts you much greater than reading text about it. You will defiantly remember a time where you got to feel and see what you learned about much more than when you were reading about it.

  • Jake Ng

    Coming from a school that is pretty much founded on hands on experience, I believe that it is a great way of teaching. Siting in a class everyday and reading a text book about something is really an old and boring way of teaching. Sure you’ve read about it, but actually getting to see and feel what your learning about is what makes it such a powerful way of teaching. It impacts you much greater than reading text about it. You will defiantly remember a time where you got to feel and see what you learned about much more than when you were reading about it.

  • Ryan KC

    I personally believe that having a hands on experience when working can be very beneficial. For me, I learn better when I can get my hands on somethin and actually build it. There is a fine difference between someone verbally explaining something and someone that gives the students the ability to actually figure out what the thing does and mess with it. The school I go to allows for a great hands on experience. We have a project based learning environment, so my thoughts are a little swayed. Anyways, I feel that if you want to truly master something, you need to get it into your hands and mess with it, break it, fix it and learn how to make it better.

  • Ryan KC

    I personally believe that having a hands on experience when working can be very beneficial. For me, I learn better when I can get my hands on somethin and actually build it. There is a fine difference between someone verbally explaining something and someone that gives the students the ability to actually figure out what the thing does and mess with it. The school I go to allows for a great hands on experience. We have a project based learning environment, so my thoughts are a little swayed. Anyways, I feel that if you want to truly master something, you need to get it into your hands and mess with it, break it, fix it and learn how to make it better.

  • Billy C

    Honestly, not all students learn the same way as others do and that some students might just feel more comfortable with a sheet of paper and a textbook. That being said I personally enjoy having some sort of hands on experience and interactivity with things that we learn in school. I think it’s a good way to get students interested about a certain topic and a student that’s interested is more likely to try harder and do better. I also completely agree with what Adam said in the video, “I think that if you give a kid what he is interested in he will learn all of the stuff around him much faster than if you try and give him everything all at once.” I agree that a student who is interested in the things in which he or she gets to learn will most likely learn faster and have a better experience learning. All schools should try to get their students interested, excited even for the things that they teach. Give students opportunities to make choices and learn things that they want to learn.

  • Billy C

    Honestly, not all students learn the same way as others do and that some students might just feel more comfortable with a sheet of paper and a textbook. That being said I personally enjoy having some sort of hands on experience and interactivity with things that we learn in school. I think it’s a good way to get students interested about a certain topic and a student that’s interested is more likely to try harder and do better. I also completely agree with what Adam said in the video, “I think that if you give a kid what he is interested in he will learn all of the stuff around him much faster than if you try and give him everything all at once.” I agree that a student who is interested in the things in which he or she gets to learn will most likely learn faster and have a better experience learning. All schools should try to get their students interested, excited even for the things that they teach. Give students opportunities to make choices and learn things that they want to learn.

  • Josh_M

    Well, I’ve always been surrounded by the idea of making and creating things for yourself. My father is an engineer, and he constantly comes to me with ideas and thoughts for designs and concepts. Over time, I’ve begun to consider myself an engineer as well, and I admire the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that making requires and promotes. That being given, I most definitely consider hands-on style learning like making an excellent and effective tool. Mastering a certain technique or tool is superbly complimented by a hands-on experience, though I do think that a solely hands-on or a solely lecture-based lesson are equally ineffective. A certain balance between lecture and making is required to provide the best learning experience, in my opinion. That being said, the fact that schools have lost so much of their hands-on academic programs is still very personally disconcerting to me, though I come from a school that is very focused on project based learning. I would like to see more dynamic learning techniques re-enter the general school community, however.

  • Josh_M

    Well, I’ve always been surrounded by the idea of making and creating things for yourself. My father is an engineer, and he constantly comes to me with ideas and thoughts for designs and concepts. Over time, I’ve begun to consider myself an engineer as well, and I admire the kind of out-of-the-box thinking that making requires and promotes. That being given, I most definitely consider hands-on style learning like making an excellent and effective tool. Mastering a certain technique or tool is superbly complimented by a hands-on experience, though I do think that a solely hands-on or a solely lecture-based lesson are equally ineffective. A certain balance between lecture and making is required to provide the best learning experience, in my opinion. That being said, the fact that schools have lost so much of their hands-on academic programs is still very personally disconcerting to me, though I come from a school that is very focused on project based learning. I would like to see more dynamic learning techniques re-enter the general school community, however.

  • Rowan SS

    Being able to make things in the classroom or at home is really great, it gets people far more excited and has students wanting to do their homework even more. It lets them see how the concept works in life, not theory, and lets them figure out how to us e it to their advantage. But that doesn’t mean that this system works for everyone. While someone may learn best about physics by building a ballon a different one might gain more from do a worksheet about it. It all simply depends on who your mind works.

  • Rowan SS

    Being able to make things in the classroom or at home is really great, it gets people far more excited and has students wanting to do their homework even more. It lets them see how the concept works in life, not theory, and lets them figure out how to us e it to their advantage. But that doesn’t mean that this system works for everyone. While someone may learn best about physics by building a ballon a different one might gain more from do a worksheet about it. It all simply depends on who your mind works.

  • Rowan SS

    Having kids being able to make things for class is really helpful. It allows them to not only become more motivated about the project, it also lets them see how the concept works in real life and how to shape it to their needs. But just because that works for some people it doesn’t mean that that process works for others. Some people might gain more from writing a paper than building a hot air ballon. It all simply depends on how your mind is set up.

  • Rowan SS

    Having kids being able to make things for class is really helpful. It allows them to not only become more motivated about the project, it also lets them see how the concept works in real life and how to shape it to their needs. But just because that works for some people it doesn’t mean that that process works for others. Some people might gain more from writing a paper than building a hot air ballon. It all simply depends on how your mind is set up.

  • Catie N

    My school is based on project based learning. We often learn by completing projects and making things to build are knowledge on the subject. This may not work for some people, but I personally learn better this way. Recently I have made a roller coaster for physics class. I feel that I am learning more because I get to experience the forces and learn what works. I have always wanted to know how to make clothes because it seems really exciting.

  • Catie N

    My school is based on project based learning. We often learn by completing projects and making things to build are knowledge on the subject. This may not work for some people, but I personally learn better this way. Recently I have made a roller coaster for physics class. I feel that I am learning more because I get to experience the forces and learn what works. I have always wanted to know how to make clothes because it seems really exciting.

  • Megan

    Since elementary I’m usually one who learns from books, but after going to the school I am in now, I have had a lot of hands-on assingments. From building model cells to bridges and to cardboard boats. Frankly speaking, I believe that it is easier to learn from hands-on assignments because I am more interested and I can get a better understanding about the subject than learning from a textbook. However, a textbook is also important because they describe the subject very well, except in a compressed manner. This being said all schools should try to get kids to do hands-on assignments. this can help them become interested in the teaching and be able to enjoy the lesson instead of just reading from a textbook.

  • Megan

    Since elementary I’m usually one who learns from books, but after going to the school I am in now, I have had a lot of hands-on assingments. From building model cells to bridges and to cardboard boats. Frankly speaking, I believe that it is easier to learn from hands-on assignments because I am more interested and I can get a better understanding about the subject than learning from a textbook. However, a textbook is also important because they describe the subject very well, except in a compressed manner. This being said all schools should try to get kids to do hands-on assignments. this can help them become interested in the teaching and be able to enjoy the lesson instead of just reading from a textbook.

  • eli p

    I think that it all depends on the person. The best part of learning through making is the extra learning that teachers don’t necessarily assign, but the students learn through doing it themselves. The school I go to allows for a great hands on experience.I think all schools should try to get there students to do hands on assignments.

  • eli p

    I think that it all depends on the person. The best part of learning through making is the extra learning that teachers don’t necessarily assign, but the students learn through doing it themselves. The school I go to allows for a great hands on experience.I think all schools should try to get there students to do hands on assignments.

  • Jacky

    I believe human can learn more through making. When we made something, we will always remember how we did it, and if something similar happens, we will use that way to make it again. For example, I am a website developer, when I create my own code to do something, I will always memorize it, later on I will use that again for other problems. So basically you will learn how to make similar stuff faster and better.

  • Jacky

    I believe human can learn more through making. When we made something, we will always remember how we did it, and if something similar happens, we will use that way to make it again. For example, I am a website developer, when I create my own code to do something, I will always memorize it, later on I will use that again for other problems. So basically you will learn how to make similar stuff faster and better.

  • Jiahao S

    As a student of a project-based learning school I think I learn better when I can get my hands on something than just reading a text book. And I personally enjoy making things more than just reading about them.

  • Jiahao S

    As a student of a project-based learning school I think I learn better when I can get my hands on something than just reading a text book. And I personally enjoy making things more than just reading about them.

  • Koda C

    I also think hands-on assignments are a better way to teach students. Mostly because through out all of my school years that is all we have been doing and it is very enjoyable. Just recently we made a roller coaster for a marble and we had to use all of the things we learned in physics to constuct it a a group. It would be better if more things were hands on intead of just writing assignments.

  • Koda C

    I also think hands-on assignments are a better way to teach students. Mostly because through out all of my school years that is all we have been doing and it is very enjoyable. Just recently we made a roller coaster for a marble and we had to use all of the things we learned in physics to constuct it a a group. It would be better if more things were hands on intead of just writing assignments.

  • Dimitri S

    I believe that learning by making it the best way to learn something new. I have personally learned in depth about chemistry and electronics outside of school by is wing a hands on approach. Instead of reading about it I did the experiments with chemicals and electronic components. This is also the way I learned about programming in multiple languages. I think that this form of education should be used more in schools because of its power to teach.

  • Dimitri S

    I believe that learning by making it the best way to learn something new. I have personally learned in depth about chemistry and electronics outside of school by is wing a hands on approach. Instead of reading about it I did the experiments with chemicals and electronic components. This is also the way I learned about programming in multiple languages. I think that this form of education should be used more in schools because of its power to teach.

  • Oliviar

    I do lern better by making things. That’s one of the reasons I came to ACLC. For example last night I made a piñata for the last day of school. It’s made out of cardboard and lots of hot glue. There are also four compartments for candy. If we could do more making/building for school I would always have A’s.

  • Oliviar

    I do lern better by making things. That’s one of the reasons I came to ACLC. For example last night I made a piñata for the last day of school. It’s made out of cardboard and lots of hot glue. There are also four compartments for candy. If we could do more making/building for school I would always have A’s.

  • Brianna Benedetto

    I also agree. Although notetaking helps with backtracking and studying, I feel that for one to fully comprehend the material they are given they must get there hands a little dirty. Like in physics, there were concepts that I had absoluetly no clue what they even meant and it hurt my eyes to even look at. But when we had to start building the devices that were based off the concepts we were learning everything clicked! It twas a whole new world indeed

  • Brianna Benedetto

    I also agree. Although notetaking helps with backtracking and studying, I feel that for one to fully comprehend the material they are given they must get there hands a little dirty. Like in physics, there were concepts that I had absoluetly no clue what they even meant and it hurt my eyes to even look at. But when we had to start building the devices that were based off the concepts we were learning everything clicked! It twas a whole new world indeed

  • branden

    i think learng through makeing things is great beacaues it helps me to learn more, i find it allot more than just reading about it. just the other day i had to make a trebuche for math class and i got to learn what it takes to make an object fly a certian distance and how to change. i think biulding and makeing stuff is more fun than just learning about it.

  • branden

    i think learng through makeing things is great beacaues it helps me to learn more, i find it allot more than just reading about it. just the other day i had to make a trebuche for math class and i got to learn what it takes to make an object fly a certian distance and how to change. i think biulding and makeing stuff is more fun than just learning about it.

  • Jake

    I think teaching is more complicated than most people think. To teach someone you have to take whats in your brain, and put in someone else’s. I think that hands on experience helps students learn much more than when they are just reading out of a textbook and if more schools embraced learning through making, I believe students would learn much more and enjoy learning much more. If you get hands on experience in a class like Math or Science you will see the formulas acting in real life rather than on paper and you will actually feel like you are learning something important.

  • Jake

    I think teaching is more complicated than most people think. To teach someone you have to take whats in your brain, and put in someone else’s. I think that hands on experience helps students learn much more than when they are just reading out of a textbook and if more schools embraced learning through making, I believe students would learn much more and enjoy learning much more. If you get hands on experience in a class like Math or Science you will see the formulas acting in real life rather than on paper and you will actually feel like you are learning something important.

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  • Daysia Evans

    Being that i do go to a school that is very big on hands on projects , I can speak from personal experience and say that hands on projects are because they open you up to new things and they teach you how to do things on your own. Recently in my physics class we were required to build a model roller coaster. Looking at the syllabus for the project it seemed simple, until we actually went for it hands on . There were a whole bunch of mess up and mishaps with the project things that we thought would be super easy. So to me hands on experience is actually a good thing because it teaches you new ways of building and making things. It also helps you comprehend things better when it comes to reviewing a chapter or lesson.

  • Daysia Evans

    Being that i do go to a school that is very big on hands on projects , I can speak from personal experience and say that hands on projects are because they open you up to new things and they teach you how to do things on your own. Recently in my physics class we were required to build a model roller coaster. Looking at the syllabus for the project it seemed simple, until we actually went for it hands on . There were a whole bunch of mess up and mishaps with the project things that we thought would be super easy. So to me hands on experience is actually a good thing because it teaches you new ways of building and making things. It also helps you comprehend things better when it comes to reviewing a chapter or lesson.

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  • davidjenny

    I think learning by hands on experience or by lecture really depends on the person. I’d agree that both are essential, but I personally like hands on approach more. I do like my school but there are few experiments. Not many opportunities to try things out for ourselves. I am in too film, therefore I very much enjoy making movies and videos with friends and its a same we don’t do it more in school. As science and bus driver extraordinaire Mrs. Frizzle once said “Take chances, get messy, make mistakes.” By not preparing your self to fail every once in a while you are preparing to fail

  • Brandon C

    If you’re talking about hands on learning, it’s hands on (get it?) the best way I learn. My problem is that most theory just doesn’t make sense to me. I have poor visualization skills and therefore produce low quality work when all I have to work with is theory. When I’m able to see the work or apply it, however, it makes a lot more sense to me. Take making videos, when I started all I had were a couple mediocre guides on the internet. However as I repeated making them through school projects I began to improve. Compare this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llQFAtC0fBI

    To this one

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CZcY-Lndmw

    One is a blatant copy of another Youtuber, the other is a more original version that I only could have achieved through practice. It’s far from perfect (or by some peoples’ opinions good) but to me It’s much better than the first one and it’s something I could only have achieved through doing over and over again.

  • Victor Herrera

    Me personally haven’t done a lot of hands on making stuff when learning . But I learn better when I see and hear something a lot that is how i passed chemistry with all A’s I learned by doing what was taught and we didn’t have a lot of homework either . My chemistry also had had to this thing to decide what type of learner we were . so i think we just need to figure what type of leaner and do our best to help him or her.

  • Maliha M

    I think along with other methods of learning, hands-on would be a very successful addition to the process. I am a natural visual learner and hands-on is an extension of that. Making is a way of learning the characteristics of things while at the same time experiencing it. If you have the opportunity to see the lesson in action than there’s a bigger chance you’ll retain more information.

  • Francesca Botto

    Over my years of schooling I have learned that I grasp concepts better by being hands on. I like to have tangible objects to help myself learn and understand. For example, in chemistry during middle school we were balancing equations, and we used legos to show how the atoms moved in order to keep a balance. I also had to create an egg drop, in order to show the elements of velocity and its impact.

  • Caroline P

    I learn better through hands on experiments and hands on making. For example, in my English class this year we made a blog and wrote columns about each chapter of a book we were reading. I understood the book better through writing about it, and through creating a blog about it. To contrast, in my biology class, my teacher’s sole way of teaching is through lectures. I don’t learn as well and have a hard time grasping concepts when I am not creating anything, or, in the case of biology, dissecting anything. Overall, my learning style is definitely more hands on. I would prefer creating something to better grasp a concept instead of reading about it in a thick textbook. The art of creation is being lost in our schools, but I believe that with younger teachers, and older teachers who immerse themselves in newer learning styles, our generations will be able to flourish in a new age of creation.

  • Nikki J.

    I’ve always been a hands on learner. I can’t visualize ideas well so I need to see something tangible in order for my mind to make sense of it. In math class I cannot visualize equations, I need to do math problems physically to understand it better. Teachers should incorporate more hands on style teaching rather than just lectures because I do believe more kids learn more from hands on styles. There are a select few people who learn better visually but they are a small percentage. Hands on learning has made me a more successful student.

  • Alex M

    Experiencing something for yourself is always better than simply being told about it. Demonstrations and labs always make me learn things better, and remember them longer. Lectures can still be a useful way to learn, but when accompanied by hands-on demonstrations, the learning experience is greatly amplified. In classes where there are only lectures, I have to study a lot more or else I do worse on tests than in classes where there is a lot of hands on. Another thing that makes Hands-on a better approach to learning is that it is simply much more fun. It keeps your mind engaged. I have never fallen asleep during a lab, but I have during lectures plenty of times. Hands on is a great approach to education that needs to be used far more often.

  • carlos a

    I like the idea of learning by making something because it keeps you more involved. I would rather make something and get a feel of things rather than just getting it out of a book. Making stuff would makes things a lot more fun and it would make it so that people would actually like to go to school even more.

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  • Paige Thompson

    I like the thought of learning by making something rather than sitting in front of a book and reading instructions. This would help a numerous amount of students out. For example I would rather bake then sit there and read about baking or cooking also.