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Where Are All the Green Spaces?

| April 22, 2014 | 79 Comments
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Sidewalk flower in Oakland, CA photo by Joel Wanek

Sidewalk flower in Oakland, CA
photo by Joel Wanek


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDEdspace and end it with #DoNowGreen

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.


Do Now

Are there areas in your neighborhood that could or should be transformed into green spaces? Or, are there existing green spaces that should be preserved? Take a picture of one of these spaces or simply take a picture of plant life growing in an unexpected area.

Introduction

Today is Earth Day and the global theme of this year’s activities is “Green Cities”. Right now more than half of the world’s population lives in cities and by 2050 that number is expected to rise to at least 67%. As more people move into urban areas, buildings, highways and other structures are built to accommodate the growth. Green spaces and other natural environments that once flourished are pushed out to make room for man-made structures. Not only is space for plants and wildlife compromised but often they have to fight to exist at all.

But wherever there are areas of soil along freeways, in the cracks of sidewalks and in vacant lots, plant life can be found. We often look at these plants as weeds but many of them are actually tenacious, pioneer-like plants claiming new territory. They often have to fight off pollution, lack of water, trampling and other forms of neglect. Although clusters of “pioneer plants” can be found in any city or town, each one is actually a unique ecosystem. Looking at them more closely can provide a real appreciation of the adaptability of these plants and can be an excellent resource for learning about our relationship with nature.

There is a growing movement in cities around the world working to change our relationship with these neglected spaces. Urban gardeners of all kinds are reclaiming and cultivating any bits of land they can find. Entire vacant lots and roadsides are being transformed into flower or vegetable gardens. Will Allen in Milwaukee, Ron Finley in Los Angeles, Occupy the Farm in Albany, CA are just a few of the many individuals and collectives working to change their communities through gardening. All three have transformed stretches of land into viable agricultural areas and are working to educate others around issues of food justice, urban farming and land reform.

Other “guerrilla gardeners” are working on a much smaller scale. Three art students from the Superior School of Art and Design in Reims, France have manufactured Urban Greenhouses which are placed around plants that naturally grow in the cracks of sidewalks or other “undesirable” locations. The greenhouses provide a protective barrier for the plant and call attention to the fact that they exist.

In London, artist Steve Wheen (video below), better known as the Pothole Gardener, aims to brighten commuters’ days by planting colorful flowers in potholes on the sidewalks and in streets.

Resource

Pothole Gardener video Holes Of Happiness
Holes Of Happiness is a short documentary looking at the reactions of the public to some pothole gardens that have been popping up around East London.


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDedspace and end it with #DoNowGreen

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.

We encourage students to reply to other people’s tweets to foster more of a conversation. Also, if students tweet their personal opinions, ask them to support their ideas with links to interesting/credible articles online (adding a nice research component) or retweet other people’s ideas that they agree/disagree/find amusing. We also value student-produced media linked to their tweets. You can visit our video tutorials that showcase how to use several web-based production tools. Of course, do as you can… and any contribution is most welcomed.


More Resources

KQED Forum radio segment A Field Guide to Urban Foraging
A growing number of city slickers are foraging for fruit growing in a neighbor’s backyard, for mushrooms in the local park or for weeds by the roadside that might make a nice salad. We talk to local foragers about how to hunt down and prepare dandelions, berries, snails, frogs and other delights.

WikiHow article How to Start Guerrilla Gardening
Guerrilla gardening is a term used to describe the unauthorized cultivation of plants or crops on vacant public or private land. For some practitioners, Guerrilla Gardening is a political statement about land rights or reform[1]; for others, it is primarily an opportunity to beautify and improve neglected, barren or overgrown spaces.

KQED QUEST article Urban Farms in San Francisco Struggle to Put Down Roots
Americans are falling in love with city gardens. From truck bed farms to guerrilla gardening, urbanites have found a way to bring small scale farming into the city. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, around 15 percent of the world’s food is now grown in urban areas.

KQED Spark video Natalie Jeremijenko
One of the hottest topics in modern science is genetic cloning. In this episode of “Art Meets Nature,” Spark trails along with artist and engineer Natalie Jeremijenko as she moves forward with her ambitious project, “OneTree(s),” a combination of art, science and nature. A long-term project, “OneTree(s)” is a citywide enviro-social sculpture that encourages individual action and community dialogue around contemporary environmental issues.

KQED Bay Area Bites article Want To Forage In Your City? There’s a Map For That
If you really love your peaches and want to shake a tree, there’s a map to help you find one. That goes for veggies, nuts, berries and hundreds of other edible plant species, too. Avid foragers Caleb Philips and Ethan Welty launched an interactive map last month that identifies more than a half-million locations across the globe where fruits and veggies are free for the taking.


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Category: Do Now, Do Now: Art and Popular Culture

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  • 18cloc

    A green space that should be preserved.

  • 18rche

    I feel like there are a few too many green spaces in our school. They should be preserved so there’s open space for kids to play. I’m not saying there shouldn’t be any green spaces, because there should be a lot, I just feel like we have a little too many random green spaces around our campus.

    • BellaP_3boydbence

      I disagree with you, about the getting rid of green spaces. If you watch the video above, just a simple flower in the pavement made someones day. I think that even kids need places to play, the grass and flowers can be a perfect place. Kids can still kick a ball around in the grass, and doing cartwheels is more safe in the grass. If its little random green spaces that worries one, maybe then you can expand that green space?

    • Cole Wierman boydbence

      I disagree with you, Losing green spaces is killing mother nature. Once you build over soil, it is hard to get it healthy again, so why do that? A little green space is better than none.

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      I disagree with you. There is never enough green spaces in this world. Nature was here thousands of years before us, and we chose to get rid of it. Nature gives us oxygen we need to survive our lives, building give off smoke and pollution to the air, and you say that there is too much? If you ask me, there is too much pollution going around in our lives. “Millions of people much more susceptible to such killers as acute respiratory infections, malaria and a host of other life-threatening diseases, according to the research”. If there is not enough nature, this will potentially continue to happen.

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070813162438.htm

    • MikeM_3boydbence

      Yes I understand that there should be areas for kids to play. But also saving the environment is a better thing for our Earth. Green places should be in places where there is the most green.

  • Alton Barnhart

    No matter happens to this world, there will always be green life because Mother Nature will take over when we are gone.
    https://imgur.com/a/D9iDC

    • David_N_2

      What you state is true which is all the more reason to “cooperate” with nature. If we continue to construct and build on top of nature, we would soon die because nature is the one thing that provides us with all of our necessities. Just as all the images in the link you’ve given, it shows that nature starts to reclaim it’s territory without the presence of humans. Why not just coexist with nature instead of overriding it and causing the destruction of ourselves because either way nature will be the one that wins.

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      What you just said is true, but what will waiting for our planet to die do? Wouldn’t it be a lot better for us to just work together to save where we live. When you say “when we are gone”. It could either mean, we had all been wiped out, or we had moved to who knows where. “Both factors contribute to the malnourishment and disease susceptibility of 3.7 billion people, he says”. Instead of fighting nature, why not work with it?

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070813162438.htm

    • brittneyd_3boydbence

      I agree that nature grows where humans abandon, but the global population population is growing, not decreasing. If you look at this map of the us, you can see just how little forest coverage we still have left, although 80% of americans live in urban areas.

      http://www.fs.fed.us/openspace/fote/sustaining.html

  • Cole Reinhold

    I think that a green space would be nice to have downtown, since its kind of ugly and could use something like a small park square. And we need to keep Centennial Park from getting anymore industrialized by the ‘man’ man.

    • David_N_2

      Ugly is what you describe your downtown, and ugly will be what is described as our earth if we do not preserve it. Nature is not just some luxury to decorate a town. Nature is the foundation of all life on this planet! In the article it states “Looking at them more closely can provide a real appreciation of the adaptability of these plants and can be an excellent resource for learning about our relationship with nature.” which is what most people lack. People lack the knowledge of our relationship with nature. The average person will probably just know that trees give off air and that plants can produce edible fruit, but do they know what lies beyond that? Nature helps us, but we’re on the verge of killing it, but Nature will always find a way if it has been “defeated”. Nature is like a hermit crab. Once it is out and about, it can help you, but once you start to threaten it, then it will “hide” until the “danger” has “left”. If we want to survive, then we better take good care of our supporter.

    • BellaP_3boydbence

      I agree with you, in my community they actually made a park on a highway. It sounds dangerous but it was actually very clever. The picture below is a birds eye view of the park. I agree that in towns there should be more green space and this is one of the ways you can do so. I understand this is a big measure, but you can even do simple things such as going downtown and doing what they did in the video.

    • Cole Reinhold

      Its a maze.

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      I agree. You think this is ugly? Imagine what it would be like if we continue to live out our lives that same way. Nature is a gift to everyone and anything. It gives us our breathing life that we would need to live every single day, yet we continue to ruin it. If all billions of people in this world were to contribute just a little of their time, we could make a difference. “Nearly half the world’s people are crowded into urban areas, often without adequate sanitation, and are exposed to epidemics of such diseases as measles and flu”. Downtown is this kind of place, and if we continue, this is what we will become.

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070813162438.htm

    • Riley_R_1BoydBence

      I agree with you because there are too many buildings and too much construction in the areas that used to be green areas. Downtown would be way more beautiful and would attract a lot more people if there were more green spaces.

    • Brent_L_Per1

      Exactly, Dallas recently added Klyde Warren Park in our downtown area and it really is nice to see something calm in a big city like Dallas.

  • Wesley Seidelmann

    We have some green space. Not a whole lot but enough to make downtown look nice. It would be even better if we could have more but it does require money.

    • BellaP_3boydbence

      A suggestion I have for you would be maybe go downtown and do what they did in the video. Go plant plants in the cracks of the sidewalk and see what happens. Below is a link on some good gardening tips. http://www.almanac.com/gardening

    • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

      Agreed more green spaces would be nice any time of the year but money comes into play and could result in a problem if there is not enough of it.

  • Brandon Milligan

    We have a little bit of green space and it makes everything look nice.

  • Ben

    I think the green place really makes a down or any public place look better. I think the more we have the better.

    • David_N_2

      Agreed, but I don’t think we should have those small “snippets” of greenery. I think that entire landmasses of nature should be preserved. It just doesn’t make earth look like a better place, but it helps us thrive along with nature. The article says “Urban gardeners of all kinds are reclaiming and cultivating any bits of land they can find.” and I think that all of us should pitch in a little bit and help out. Earth is our home and we must take care of our home.

    • Cole Wierman boydbence

      I agree that we should have green areas around us more, instead of just in parks. It looks nicer and we all could use more oxygen!

  • David_N_2

    With the growing global population, housing and such are in growing demand. Nature can’t keep up with the drastically fast paced construction. We are destroying our precious earth God put out for us. We should be lucky enough to find plants growing in potholes and cracks. They are the few plants that were able to survive. The article says “We often look at these plants as weeds but many of them are actually tenacious, pioneer-like plants claiming new territory. They often have to fight off pollution, lack of water, trampling and other forms of neglect.” which is what we do almost every passing day. They’re the very essence of nature trying to show all of us that we should try and preserve such beauty.
    We have to harmoniously coexist with neither one dominating the other. Most, if not all, of nature should be preserved. It’s funny how we cut down forests and natural land and “remodel” it with a park. Why not just leave it be? If one day all of the forest’s trees were cut to stumps and all of the flowered fields constructed on, then we would die because we rely on nature to support us. Nature provides us with food and air. If we cannot support nature, then we cannot support ourselves. All of nature should be preserved and taken care of because if it’s not, then we humans will go down with it.

    Although this is a picture of a park, it’s very beautiful and should be preserved.

  • BellaP_3boydbence

    Where I live there are some places that are beautiful and green but, in others its very dull and its almost sad to look at.We need to make the places that are dull, more green. In my community we have vacant spaces that we could fill with flowers and other plants but people get too lazy and don’t do it. In the article is says “Entire vacant lots and roadsides are being transformed into flower or vegetable gardens.” I find this interesting because like I previously stated we have space. We have space for many plants and different varieties. The picture below is an example of a place in my community where we have created a good green environment as well as good spaces to get around. Just because a pavement is put into one place does not mean you have to knock down the rest of the plants surrounding it. With that said, we should revive places that have dead plants and make it look more lively and keep these green environments. The link below is a good place to look at more information about how to go green. http://www.worldwatch.org/resources/go_green_save_green

  • Riley_R_1BoydBence

    Where I live, there are some green places that should be preserved. In other areas, there are nice places, like parks and lakes, that people use as trashcans. They just throw there trash on the grounds of parks or the waters of lakes. This needs to be stopped because trash on the grounds of parks and in the waters of lakes can kill animals. If an animal sees a can on the ground or in the water, it may try to eat it, and if the animal tries to eat the can, it could choke to death.

  • Isaac Scarborough

    Here’s one

    • Samantha Wojcik

      That picture looks beautiful. I like how every thing around the flower is is like dull but the flower brings the beauty to the picture.

  • Dakota Brooke

    I don’t think it is too much of a worry around here about not having space for green stuff. A lot of the places around here that will always be woods or area that any plant can grow without worrying about getting uprooted for industry.

    • Dakota Brooke

      Here’s a picture of my backyard by my woods and a deer.

      • Wesley Seidelmann

        That’s pretty epic. I really like it. If we had more greenspace like that it would be amazing.

    • Cole Wierman boydbence

      I am guessing you live in the country. Mostly in the city is where it is getting over ran by concrete. The green spaces are depleting.

    • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

      Dakota, same here. Behind my backyard was a woods and it had all sorts of kinds of wild life. But I don’t think my woods had deer though.

    • MikeM_3boydbence

      Yeah I agree. There is space for green houses put people think there dumb. Most people that think there dumb don’t go in that kind of area.

    • brittneyd_3boydbence

      I agree that there are some woods left, but the amount of urban areas is growing. I think adding green space could be beneficial for these areas, as things like cars give off a lot of CO2 emissions.

      If you look at this map, it shows how little tree canopy there is left. The article also points out that roughly 80% of america lives in an urban area.

      http://www.fs.fed.us/openspace/fote/sustaining.html

    • Brent_L_Per1

      I think the bigger concern is having green areas in urban and suburban environments. Having a garden or something can really give off a positive atmosphere in a busy city.

  • Daniel

    These types of images are the type that make you realize how beautiful the world is. Not to totally sound like a hippie, but the earth is an amazing place. This night was an amazing night for my dad and I. We went for a cruise in my dad’s old stick shift Mercedes, when we were coming home we realized how close a hot air balloon was from our house. We ran inside and went to the porch, (this is where I was standing when this picture was taken.) A slight breeze took the balloon straight over our heads, within about 100 feet. It was at that moment I realized how eerily quiet hot air balloons are. With the exception of the flame propelling the balloon, there is no noise. So when the pilot is not pulling the chord, it is silently gliding through the air. My dad and I had a full conversation with the guy 100 feet in the air. We weren’t yelling. We were merely talking.

    • 18kgoe

      That’s so pretty!!!

  • Camdon Hisey

    Este es mi Abuela en su jardín.

    • Isaac Scarborough

      Tu familia es muy fantastico y tu jardín es muy grandsímo, Bueno!

  • Cole Wierman boydbence

    I believe that green spaces should be kept preserved. Based on where I live, there is almost no green left. Every day, more housing and concrete goes up. Noone is paying attention to the environment. Society just wants to make money.

  • 18kgoe

    We have a large campus at our school of which I have yet to explore. We are right next to a walking path with beautiful trees and rivers. However, my old school has nothing but patches of dead grass with some light on the grass that wasn’t dyed to look perfect. It’s sad… Expecially if you go out to the Senior Court yard and saw the dead flowers and leaves shriveled and falled. It honestly looked abandoned. I’m so happy I now go to this school :).

    I think green space should be preserved, but where I live it’s not a problem :).

    • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

      18kgoe, I totally agree. We need to preserve these green spaces. In this link below, it talks about the advantage of owning a vast open green space.

      http://science.kqed.org/quest/2013/08/22/urban-farms-in-san-francisco-struggle-to-put-down-roots/

    • Riley_R_1BoydBence

      i totally agree. We need to preserve the green spaces. That way we are killing any forms of life in those areas.

    • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

      i agree green spaces must be kept but kept at a certain rate and note preserved so much that it overflows.

    • Brent_L_Per1

      I agree, having green spaces just totally changes the mood of an area and seeing a large dead patch and seeing everything paved just gives off a negative vibe.

    • NWeix-1stboydbence

      I agree, green spaces should be preserved to help the animals and air we breath get better. Keep in mind that when we take down green space we’re destroying the homes of innocent creatures.

  • 18tmon

    There are lots of areas around my house that could be transformed into green spaces. There is already a stream and field across from my house. I can see where more houses were made where a small area of woods used to be. I think if the population growth was slowed we could focus on preserving this beautiful land.

    • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

      Agreed there are spaces around my house that could / should be touched up. My front yard is completely dirt with few grass patches it needs love. I have also heard were i live there used to be trees everywhere but with the growth of population they have been cut down to make room for houses

    • MikeM_3boydbence

      Thats the same thing around my area. There a big forest where there is a stream and a lot of trees for a lot of different animals. They can also make green houses in that area because it has some flat land in it.

  • 18jcol

    I think adding more plants and trees around would bring more happiness to city’s and other more dark places.

  • 18vmon

    I think on way to preserve our beautiful lad is to appreciate it. The only way we can do that is to explore and actually go outside! If we start to love our land then we won’t want to see it go.

  • 18wlam

    Yes there are a few spaces in my neighborhood where there use to be houses.

  • Pinya Colada

    There are many places around my house that could be fixed up and used for green space, but they’re probably going to turn into property for buildings. We should add more green to make our world more colorful in the darkest places.

    • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

      Wow, I really liked the place where you used to live. Same here also, there used to be a woods right behind my backyard, but then they chopped it all down to make houses. I mean I guess it is worth it, but at the same time it isn’t. Other people are saying the say in this article.

      http://blogs.kqed.org/bayareabites/2013/04/23/want-to-forage-in-your-city-theres-a-map-for-that/

    • Riley_R_1BoydBence

      I agree that we should add more green spaces. If we add more green spaces, we will have more plants and maybe some animals, which will make our world more beautiful.

    • brittneyd_3boydbence

      I agree. Front and backyards of these new buildings could include green space.

  • john

    The natural beauty of where I live.

  • Kyle Williams

    The natural beauty of where I used to live

    • Daniel

      This is such a good picture.

    • Cole Reinhold

      Wow. Its looks really pretty. 10/10 Would not recommend.

    • john

      That is Beautiful.

  • ClaireB_period2_BoydBence

    There are areas in my
    community that preserve green space, but not enough of it. For example there
    are many new houses going up where previously there was green space. Also there
    are places where we can put plants to make it more appealing to the eye. Some
    places around my town are unappealing and need a face lift. If we add some
    flowers to make it visually appealing it might just bring in more people so
    that everyone can enjoy the outside world.
    Here is an example of my house and how adding some flowers can do to make your house
    look more inviting.

  • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

    I think that it is very important for us to keep our community clean. There are many places that I think that should be green. We have a very big plaza kind of place with many restaurants and things that are taking up a lot of the natural places. I think that if the buildings were reduced or if the buildings were to put a little of space dedicated to plants and nature, then it wouldn’t do as much harm. “About 40 percent of deaths worldwide are caused by water, air and soil pollution, concludes a Cornell researcher”. If we continue to live out our lives the same way we do everyday, what will be left of our planet? Eventually, pollution would over run us, and we would regret all the things that caused it in the past. We could change this if we all take a little part of changing the environment.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070813162438.htm

  • brittneyd_3boydbence

    I think it is important to preserve green spaces, but I think it is also just as important to create more green space. The city I live in has some green space- but there is constant construction occurring that is taking it away. For example, last year, acres of trees were cut down to build a few homes. I think to counteract with this we should not only limit the number of homes built, but put some of the green space back.
    For example, this photo was taken from my front lawn. If everyone in the city added trees and plants to their yards, the city would look a lot nicer and would be more eco-friendly.
    The USDA Forest says that “tree cover in urban areas of the conterminous United States is estimated at 35.1 percent”. And with rising urban area coverage, this percentage is excepted to drop even lower.

    http://www.fs.fed.us/openspace/fote/sustaining.html

  • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

    I think we should keep all of these “green spaces”. To me all of those green spaces bring me peace in mind and it really comforts me. I live in Coppell, and here there used to be vast amounts of green spaces. Now they chop trees down, built houses over vast acres of beautiful green grass, etc. For example, behind my backyard to my house, there were woods. And in those woods were spectacular wild life. Like bobcats, cardinals, squirrels, etc. Now in morning, I no longer have those serenity noises to wake me up in the morning. No chirping of the vast species of birds, no munching and nocking of acorns that the squirrels hit on my window, and so much more. I really miss it. So we seriously need to keep these green spaces, because once your latched onto them, it’s hard to forget them.

    • NWeix-1stboydbence

      Well, recently Dallas added Klyde Warren Park, a nature preserve/park for our area, and I think it fits the part nicely. It’s a pretty beautiful place, in my opinion.

  • Josephine

    These pretty little flowers are growing on Roman ruins in Lyon, France

    • Kyle Williams

      I wonder what it looked like when it was originally made during the time of the Roman Empire!

  • Samantha Wojcik

    This is one

  • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

    Were i live there are many green spaces that are pretty. I believe that we should keep these places the same and protected. I also believe that there are places that should be transformed in a way into green spaces. Greens spaces are what make earth, earth.They provide us with fresh air and without them we would have a very hard time living here with no oxygen. Were i live we have nature trails and soon to be a butterfly garden of some sort. I think that if people decided to make those types of things in more places our towns, our world would look a lot greener.

  • MikeM_3boydbence

    In my opinion I don’t think we should get rid of any of the green areas. When you see an area like that it makes you happy no matter what. When I’m mad I walk to those areas so I can clam down. Also I don’t think they should cut down any forest no matter where it is. It holds a lot animals and many things could change if there weren’t any trees there.

    • NWeix-1stboydbence

      I totally agree, green space not only makes clean air but also acts as the home for numerous animals. It’d be very rude if a pink unicorn came up and bulldozed your town down, and then planted a forest because it’s pals needed homes. So don’t be like that unicorn.

  • Brent_L_Per1

    Keeping green spaces is very important. Not only are green spaces visually pleasing but they are also important to us as humans, as plants produce the oxygen we breathe. It seems nowadays that we’re so focused on using every single patch of land around us that we’re creating an artificial life for ourselves. When you look out a window and see nature all of that is real and natural, while we’re always stuck inside the artificial shell we’ve made for ourselves. While air conditioning and everything like that is great it’s strange that we seem to do anything to avoid going outside. I think green spaces are a good idea to maintain our connection to nature and not totally ignore our roots.

  • ChristianH_2boydbence

    With all the people saying out door green spaces help the environment, they boost local economy, and they’re great for wild life why would anyone want to get rid of them? people keep asking what they do for us but they never really act on the urge. People should realize that these spaces boost the economy in positive ares like ,”Smart Money Magazine indicated that consumers value a landscaped home up to 11.3 percent higher…A study by Aspen Environmental Companies found that a landscaping investment is nearly always recovered and can help reduce time on the market.2.” But also they help the environment,”Water quality protection. Proper landscaping reduces nitrate leaching from the soil into the water supply and reduces surface water runoff, keeping phosphorus and other pollutants out of our waterways and preventing septic system overload……Improved air quality. Trees, shrubs and turf remove smoke, dust and other pollutants from the air. One tree can remove 26 pounds of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere annually, equaling 11,000 miles of car emissions. One study showed that one acre of trees has the ability to remove 13 tons of particles and gases annually.5 • 2,500 square feet of turf absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and releases enough oxygen for a family of four to breath.” So if green spaces provide all these positive affects for our environment it goes without reason that we should keep these green spaces to better us and the world around and to leave the world a better place in the end.
    http://projectevergreen.org/resources/economic-benefits-of-green-spaces/

  • TrinityS_Per3_BoydBence

    There are many parks near me that hold a lot of life in a little space. These areas serve the people as well as the wildlife there by giving the plants and animals a place to live and giving humans a place to play and explore. If these habitats are lost, that could be an insect or flower that is one step closer to extinction. Also, environmentalists are saying how much we’re losing from cutting down trees, and if we lost those parks, it’d be disastrous to that process. Below is a picture from my park and if you look you can tell how much life is there and because the trees are so tall, they’ve been there for decades if not centuries.
    There is also a local community garden, and here there are plants (mainly foods) that are grown to share with whoever helps care for it. You may not expect a place like that to be there, but you wouldn’t want to lose it. It benefits the community and helps bring people together. Even though plants may be in places you didn’t think of before, they’re always helping everyone, from worms to people.

  • NWeix-1stboydbence

    There are plenty of statues, parks, and landmarks that I feel could be removed to make way for more plant life. Just because we can do something doesn’t mean we should. I think that some places like shopping malls or highways aren’t as necessary as others think they are, so maybe we could try to stop building so many and maybe remove some? I think any place could be removed to allow more plants to grow really. Just as long as mother nature is able to allow growth, I think we could take down a Gas Station or two to make room for trees, since, you know, they make oxygen?

  • http://stopandlearnenglish.blogspot.com.es/ M Jesús García San Martín

    One of my students, @pablomaster89 has storified his favourite green spaces. Here you are the link to his Storify: https://storify.com/pablomaster89/where-are-all-the-green-spaces-here-you-have-some