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How Can We Address The High Cost of Fast Fashion?

| April 11, 2014 | 328 Comments
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Aerial view of 2013 Savar building collapse, Bangladesh photo by rijans, Wikimedia Commons

Aerial view of 2013 Savar building collapse, Bangladesh
photo by rijans, Wikimedia Commons


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDEdspace and end it with #DoNowFashion

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.


Do Now

Who should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories? Would you pay more for clothes if they were manufactured in better conditions? Look at the label of a garment that you recently purchased and find out the brand and where it was made. Take a picture and tweet it with the info.

Introduction

It’s been a year since a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Small steps have been taken to improve safety conditions. But many labor advocates say that not nearly enough has been done.

While compensation has been offered to some victims and families, it’s often fallen short of covering cost of damages. And although more than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories, most are European brands; very few American retailers have signed on, claiming liability concerns.

The slow pace of progress underlines the fact that few consumers are willing to pay more for clothing they’re used to buying for dirt cheap prices, even if it comes with steep hidden cost. The lack of regulations allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their clothing, making it cheaper for people to buy the products in stores. For the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes.

For more on last year’s tragedy, check out The Lowdown blog.

Resource

PBS NewsHour video ‘Long way to go’ in reform of Bangladesh’s garment industry
Almost a year has passed since a Bangladeshi factory collapsed, killing more than 1,100 garment workers. What has been done in that country and by the international garment industry to make the factories there safer? And how have the victims and their families been compensated? Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro returns to Bangladesh to find out.


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDedspace and end it with #DoNowFashion

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.

We encourage students to reply to other people’s tweets to foster more of a conversation. Also, if students tweet their personal opinions, ask them to support their ideas with links to interesting/credible articles online (adding a nice research component) or retweet other people’s ideas that they agree/disagree/find amusing. We also value student-produced media linked to their tweets. You can visit our video tutorials that showcase how to use several web-based production tools. Of course, do as you can… and any contribution is most welcomed.


More Resources

KQED The Lowdown post Where Does Your T-Shirt Come From?
A simple cotton T-shirt doesn’t seem quite so simple when you try to trace the vast global process involved in making it.

KQED The Lowdown interactive Why America Stopped Making Its Own Clothes
In 1960, an average American household spent over 10 percent of its income on clothing and shoes – equivalent to roughly $4,000 today. The average person bought fewer than 25 garments each year. And about 95 percent of those clothes were made in the United States. Fast forward half a century, the average American household spends less than 3.5 percent of its budget on clothing and shoes – under $1,800. Yet, we buy more clothing than ever before.

WHYY Fresh Air radio story Ethical Fashion: Is The Tragedy In Bangladesh A Final Straw?
A garment factory that manufactures products for international clothing companies collapsed outside of Dhaka, Bangladesh, last month, killing more than 400 workers and injuring scores of others. It came on the heels of a fire at another factory in November 2012; that incident killed 112 workers.


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Category: Do Now, Do Now: Government and Civics

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About the Author ()

Matthew Green runs KQED’s News Education Project, a new online resource for educators and the general public to help explain the news. The project lives at kqed.org/lowdown.
  • nathanl_period4_boydandbence

    Blame for the events that transpired in that factory falls not on the shoulders of one person or organization, but of all parties involved in the accident(except the workers, they have little say in there working conditions). The fact that there aren’t regulations for working conditions in emerging countries is bot the fault of our government, from whom these company’s factory are being built, and the government of these nations that are not creating labor laws and the like. However it is not just the lack of regulations that are causing the lack of decent working conditions, but the corporations that are making these factories are also very much to blame, as they know about these deplorable conditions and do nothing about them so they can keep a small amount of money that would be almost no change for their total profits. And then you can go even smaller to the people running the factories who ignored the clear safety issues and made the workers continue in the factory. While of these described above are at fault, I feel that the government is the most to blame for this situation. It is the job of a government to protect there people, from the home to the workplace. While it is the bad management and cheep company that are at direct fault, if the government made it so easy for this to become so dangerous for the workers, who would find it difficult to find another job, much less one with the same or greater pay. “Bangladeshi garment workers, the majority of whom are women, receive among the world’s lowest wages – as little as $37 a month. They often work 15-hour shifts in unsafe, sweatshop conditions. Workers rights are few, and labor activism is commonly – and sometimes violently – squashed. More than a few major factory owners are either government officials or have close political ties, allowing the industry to commonly ignore safety and labor standards.” (http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/ out of sight out of mind paragraph)
    While minimum wage has been raised in Bangladesh and many company promised to raise working conditions, it is dubious at best if the promises will be carried out, so i believe that our government should set laws on american companies to enforce these statements with a heavy cost for disobeying these laws to help improve the health and economy of countries like Bangladesh around the world.

    • Beezer Kitty

      Nathanl,

      I do agree with you, the fault should fall on all parties involved. It’s the
      government responsibility to set standards and restrictions, but it is also the
      CEO’s responsibility to make sure the company is living up to those standards.
      A small part of the responsibility would also fall unto to worker’s shoulders
      because they’re the ones working in the conditions; if working conditions are
      not up to pare then it should be their responsibility to inform someone of a
      higher power of what needs improvement. It’s important for the CEO to receive feedback
      from the worker’s because they have the inside perspective.

      http://www.lrws.gov.sk.ca/employers-semployees-responsibility-workplace-health-safety

      • Jacob_W_Period3

        While the government should keep up safety and conditions of these companies. Much of the fault lands on the CEOs because they are the ones not keeping up to those regulations. Most of the workers are just in need of money. They don’t care the conditions as long as they can feed their family. They would tell people but they are just needing the money and don’t know how to make things better.

      • nathanl_period4_boydandbence

        The CEOs most likely know the working conditions, but they don’t want to spend the money to improve them. The workers complaints were ignored by the manager and would be even more ignored by him/her. Along with that it would be very difficult for the workers to find a new job if they left, and if they did the conditions would probably be the same.

  • Lukep_3boydbence

    Even though it has been a year since the factory collapse, conditions in those factories has not improved by much. ” Small steps have been taken to improve safety conditions. But many labor advocates say that not nearly enough has been done”(this coming from above). All factories should have guidelines and regulations to make sure that the factory is safe and the workers can’t be harmed. But if the item was made in better conditions I would still pay the same for it. If companies did raise the price on the item then I wouldn’t pay for it cause it is still being made in the same place for the same price. Only if more people want the product will the price go up for that item. We are paying for the item and the brand and not for the conditions it is made in.”The lack of regulations allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their clothing, making it cheaper for people to buy the products in stores. For the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes.”

    • Dylan_L_period3Bence/Boyd

      This is true. People need to stop supporting this type of manufacturing.

  • Tanya

    I think that the companies are part responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories, because they don’t really care as long as they are making money. The other part of the blame falls on the consumers, the people who buy the clothing. The consumers don’t really care either as long as they get a good shirt. Yes, I would pay more for clothes if they were manufactured in better conditions because I know that someone didn’t die so that I could have a shirt.

    • madisono-2boydbence

      I agree that the companies should be responsible for making sure that their factories are regulated and kept in good conditions. That being said, I disagree that it’s the consumers’ fault. While, if it was necessary, I would pay more for my clothing, but that isn’t what needs to be done. A quote from a KQED article titled “Who made your t-shirt?”said, “Factory conditions would likely improve if consumers were to demand it, especially if we were willing to pay more for our clothes and absorb some of the costs .” This reminded me of what you stated, which as I said before, I don’t feel is necessary.The retailers are buying these products for very cheap and marking up the price and selling the clothing to us for much more than they payed. Therefore this is preventing the factories and factory workers from receiving more money. What needs to happen is the retailers need to pay more for the items and hence giving more money to the factories, so that there can be better conditions and pay.

      This article had ton of valid points that made me think and helped me better understand this topic. I think that it would beneficial to anyone who wants a better grasp of these conflicts and everyone should take time to read through it.
      http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/

    • JoelR_Per 3_BoydBence

      I agree, because according to: http://www.economist.com/news/business/21588393-workers-continue-die-unsafe-factories-industry-keeps-booming-bursting-seams 1,100 people died because of this incident. This number is only the people died there a bunch more people that lost there job. If the extra money we pay goes into improving these factories then i’m willing to pay that.

    • Kyle_C_3boydbence

      The companies have a lot of say in where they set up to make their product and what the working conditions are like. Also they can fix the working conditions if they get messy or if the building gets messed up because they have the power to do that. I feel that it should be regulated to a point with some guidelines that the companies can go off of.

    • emily_p_2shuttleboydbence

      Tanya, I partially agree with you. i agree with you when you said that it was the companies fault, but I don’t agree with you saying that it was the consumers fault. I feel like a lot of them don’t know what is happening. A lot of the consumers have no idea that the place that the shirt they are buying was made in an unsafe condition. There is nothing that the consumer can do to fix this issue except protest. They are not the ones that tell people where they can and can’t work. “many labor advocates say that not nearly enough has been done.” (introduction in the KQED article). What are the people going to do? Or how can they do anything? I don’t think that there is any blame to be put on the consumer.

    • Lukep_3boydbence

      I somewhat agree with you, the companies should have guidelines and regulations for the conditions the workers work in. Yes, they only care about whether or not they are making money and they should use that money to improve the conditions they work in. The consumer part I don’t agree with you on. When somebody buys an item the pay for the item itself and the brand.”The lack of regulations allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their clothing, making it cheaper for people to buy the products in stores. For the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes.”(this coming from the KQED article above)

    • MaryBethD_3BoydBence

      Tanya, I agree that the companies are responsible for the clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories although I don’t completely agree that the consumers have any blame because they don’t necessarily know what’s going on in the factories. Not every factory is bad, so you would have to do research to find what’s going on behind the scenes of the factory. I think that people are careless, yes, but I don’t think
      they should be blamed for the bad working conditions. This website talks about what we, the consumers, don’t see and how crazy the unsafe conditions can be. We don’t always think of it as a big deal but there are times when thousands of people die because of a terrible working environment.
      http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/

    • CJ_Bute2boydbence

      I agree with you Tanya, that companies are part responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories. The CEO plus the companies should be responsible for unsafe factories. But I disagree with you that rest of the blame falls on the consumers. Why should it be the consumer’s fault, we aren’t the ones in charge of making sure the clothes are good to sell? In http://www.economist.com/news/… it states that, 1,100 people died from these unsafe factories. I say it is the CEO and companies fault for letting people die, they need to watch those unsafe factories more closer.

    • Devon Schildge

      It’s not really the companies fault for being economically smart and finding the cheapest way to produce a good to sell it to the consumer for a cheap price and still make money. It’s more of just the clothing industry in general. Even if one company finds a way to make sure conditions are better and have to increase the price, there are still all the other companies that will stick with the unsafe super cheap ways. Yes, it’s all about money, but that’s just what runs this world. We are now in too deep in that we can not turn back to change the ways and increase the prices. People are too used to paying the prices they are now and if companies change prices they will lose money and just end up changing back. Raising the prices will cause inflation which might make people make better decisions with the opportunity cost of buying clothes, but as i mentioned and you mention companies just want to make money so things will most likely not change anytime soon.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inflation

      • CarlosR_3BoydBence

        I agree with you, just not completely. I believe that it is in part the fault of the company, and like you I think that it’s all about money as well. According to this article http://www.macleans.ca/economy/business/what-does-that-14-shirt-really-cost/, mark up for clothing is almost 60%! A company will make a shirt that costs around $6 USD to make and then sell it for $14 USD. According to the same article, workers only see 2% of the wholesale cost in their pay!

        Now remember how I said it is “in part” the companies fault? Well the other part goes to the government and to the factory owners. The factory owners usually with ties to the government, own just bad factories and the government neglects to inspect them, and then incidents like this happen where people die. According to Judy Gearheart in this video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKXdLIr4GtE#t=39, “Bangladesh has underinvested in government regulations and enforcement of labor laws.” So to sum it all up, all the of the involved parties, the business, the government, and the factory owners are all to blame.

    • MarkL_3BoydBence

      I agree. It’s unfortunate to see that is occurring. Even now, these conditions haven’t improved very much. “Nearly one year after the deadly garment factory collapse at Rana Plaza, where more than 1,100 died, a new report after international inspections reveals that most factories still need to drastically improve conditions for workers”

      Source: http://time.com/21038/bangladeshs-garment-factories-still-unsafe-for-workers-says-report/

    • AshmeetS_3BoydBence

      I agree with you, the companies are responsible for the workers not having a safe working area, this has made them to blame the consumers. I would also pay more for a shirt or shorts for those people to provide us with these nice clothes.

    • Tclark-2boydbence

      Tanya,

      I agree, everyone involved is partly responsible, whether they
      know or not. Personally before reading this article I wouldn’t have given safe
      factory conditions a second thought when going to purchase clothes. Now that I am aware of this issue and have been informed through my research that is definitely something I will take into consideration. I would pay a little more to make sure I’m not supporting unsafe conditions for garment workers. It’s not worth saving a few extra dollars for the expense of someone’s life. However some companies didn’t share the same mindset. Victims from the factory collapse are seeking help from western companies. This article states, “only
      half of the 29 brands that sourced goods from factories in the Rana Plaza
      complex have contributed” (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/10/factory-collapse-victims_n_5121901.html)

    • CarlosR_3BoydBence

      See, I can understand where you’re coming from to say that the consumer is also to blame, but the consumer isn’t the one neglecting to regulate work outside the country! The government, the company and the factory owners are the ones who neglect inspecting the safety of the factories and put lives in danger. According to this article https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-sweatshops, around 250 million children in developing countries are working in sweatshops like the one that collapsed in Bangladesh. The article lists 11 facts about sweatshops and poor labor conditions. These are in no context in the fault of the consumer. As a consumer, we don’t choose the prices that are put on goods, we can only choose to buy them.

    • Dylan_L_period3Bence/Boyd

      I agree with this completely. It both that help contribute to the problem. The companies just want the money and we as consumers just want clothes. What a lot of people dont know is that when you pay money to companies who do this, you are supporting bad working conditions whether you realize it or not.

    • ClaireB_period2_BoydBence

      I agree that the company should know the condition of the work
      environment. Found on http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/
      it said, “last November, 112
      garment workers were killed in a factory fire near Dhaka, when supervisors
      ignored fire alarms and prevented workers from leaving their sewing machines.”
      If laws are put into place or company’s do what is right we would not have
      these problems. This could have been preventable and safety conditions need to
      be put into place. I would be willing to pay more for my cloths for workers to
      have better working conditions.

    • Jacob_W_Period3

      Things higher quality and higher maintenance deserve higher price. The consumers shouldn’t carry responsibility because really without them than these companies wouldn’t exist and people wouldn’t make money. Putting blame on the consumer is like blaming the costumer at a restaurant being responsible for a fried rat in their chicken. They went there and ordered it but it’s not there fault. Yes the workers are justing in need of money but without the consumers not carrying makes than no money.

    • ChristianH_2boydbence

      I agree with your points, its a direct connection between business and consumer that creates these deplorable conditions that workers like Josna Akhtar have to live through.

  • madisono-2boydbence

    “…More than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories…”, stated the Do Now Introduction, this is just the start of a change. After the garment factory in Bangladesh crashed over a year ago, there has been even more concerns about factory regulations and standards, who is responsible for regulating and making sure they are maintained, as well as, is a way to fix these issues by charging the consumers more for these items.
    Though us, as consumers, play a role in how much we are willing to pay for an item, the majority of the responsibility lies in the companies/retailers that own these factories. These companies or retailers have enough power and money to provided and ensure better conditions to the people in the factory. What happen is the retailers buy these products for cheap and mark up the price so that they receive a large amount of money from the consumers. And since the average consumer does not research where there clothes come from, they don’t realize what is happening. As you can see, in most cases, the consumer is not responsible and is oblivious to the issues, so why should we “punish” them by making them pay more for these goods. This being said, if it was necessary, I would pay more for my clothes, but that is not the case.
    Over all, in order to make a change, and present theses factors with better conditions, those companies and retailers must agree to pay more for the goods and not leave that responsibility for the consumers.

    This link talks more about who is responsible for these conditions.
    http://www.marcgunther.com/whos-responsible-for-factory-conditions-in-poor-countries-has-csr-gone-too-far/

    • ChristianH_2boydbence

      Yes, companies aren’t doing the right thing within these foreign countries. They simply don’t care about the man within the factory. They need to to focus on the man than the consumer, we have everything we need to live so give that privilege to those who really need it.

  • David_N_2

    As the saying goes: You have to give to get. This applies well for consumers. The narrator said “…international customers have talked about improving conditions, but haven’t been willing to pay for it.”. Human nature shines bright in this area. People are talking about providing better working conditions for those who make the garnets, but when they’re ask pay the price for it, they stop talking are sulk back into the sand like Coquina Clams! Also, I think that the people who set up the horrible working conditions should go in and risk their own lives instead of innocent people who are just looking for a job. According to a different part of the KQED website “Bangladeshi garment workers, the majority of whom are women, receive among the world’s lowest wages – as little as $37 a month. They often work 15-hour shifts in unsafe, sweatshop conditions. Worker rights are few, and labor activism is commonly – and sometimes violently – squashed.” The buildings should have been made safe and sturdy from the start! That way they last longer and they are safer to work in. This actually “saves” more money this way because building repairs and compensations would be lower. If we want a safer environment for workers to work in, then we all should pitch and pay a little more, or we could just kill people with our greed.

  • Riley_R_1BoydBence

    I think the manager or CEO of the company should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories because they decide where the company is located. according to http://www.economist.com/news/business/21588393-workers-continue-die-unsafe-factories-industry-keeps-booming-bursting-seams, 1,100 people died because of the unsafe working conditions of the factory in Bangladesh.

    I would pay more for clothes that were manufactured in better working conditions because I then know that nobody died or got injured making this item of clothing.

    • dwiltse96

      For me it is not really up to the CEO’s to regulate all of
      this stuff in the first but if a problem is reported by a factory worker or
      manager then he should take some action to fix the problem and then if nothing
      is done you can blame it on the CEO. Also
      for me the price of nice clothes that last a while is already priced pretty
      high and for a middle class person I can hardly afford buy anything that is
      above $15. The main problem Is that the people on these countries are too
      afraid to speak up about the problems because they then could get fired and
      their family would starve. https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-sweatshops

      • Jacob_W_Period3

        These people are scared to speak out because before these jobs came. The poverty level was up to 70% and while still at 40% it has gone down. Things made in better conditions and better quality should be higher priced. That means they are able to regulate the new prices on everything. Conditions need to improve but workers are just nervous to inform the boss of the elephant in the room.

    • brittneyd_3boydbence

      I disagree. I don’t think it’s really up to the CEO. Even if many CEO’s switched to making their clothing in better factories, many greedy people will still use the cheap labor. It would be better if the entire country had laws to keep the working conditions sanitary and safe. For example, in the Honduras, mountdouglas.ca says “Average/Minimum wage: $131/month, or around 70 cents/hour.” This means that the whole country has standards low enough to let minimum wage drop that low.
      http://mountdouglas.ca/webusers/mdinfotech/examples/ICTP%2011%20Websites/Top%20Sites/Clothes%20Project/hworkers.html

    • Dylan_L_period3Bence/Boyd

      I think that it makes more sense to pay more for clothes made in worse conditions because maybe that money will go to stopping the poor conditions. Then again that money might show that you support it.

  • Kyle_C_3boydbence

    I feel many things factor in when it comes to how safe and regulated the building the work area and many things like that. One thing is I think the country where the company comes out of should have regulations on what the buildings are like and if the workspace is clean and properly handle. Also if the employees have good working hours and are cared for properly. One other thing that I think the Country where the factory is should have rules on and a guideline for the companies to follow. If the working conditions were better and properly handled then I would pay a little more only like 2 or 3 dollars but not 10 or 20 dollars. Most of the time when you buy clothes you are not buying the labor or cost of materials you are paying for the brand or the logo of the company. Like a $14 dollar Polo shirt cost $5.76. http://www.macleans.ca/economy/business/what-does-that-14-shirt-really-cost/

  • MaryBethD_3BoydBence

    The lives of the workers are being risked because of the unsafe factories. “It’s been a year since a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers.” This is stated in the introduction and proves that there are places and companies that don’t make it a priority to create a safe working environment. The company owners are held responsible for the unsafe working conditions. They are making enough money to run a business so they are surely making enough to create a safer environment for the workers. The website below says, “In 1960, an average American household spent over 10 percent of its income on clothing and shoes –
    equivalent to roughly $4,000 today. Fast forward half a century, the average American household spends less than 3.5 percent of its budget on clothing and shoes – under $1,800. Yet, we buy more clothing than ever before.” I would pay more for clothes if they were manufactured in better conditions although the majority of the companies already have enough money to create better environments.

    http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/24/madeinamerica/

    • gehresj

      I definitely agree that the people who are responsible for the safety of the workers are the employers. When people come to work they should not have to worry whether they will make it home in one piece. I also wouldn’t mind a higher price of clothing if I knew the extra money was going toward safer conditions for those who made my clothes. Companies are always looking for a way to make the product cheaper for the consumer while also making a profit so I have no doubt that if companies did spend extra money on safety of workers they would also be working toward new technology to continue to produce at the lowest cost possible.

      There are other ways to control cost than putting lives in danger

      http://www.forbes.com/sites/steveodland/2012/02/15/5-ways-to-control-costs/

    • MadiT_Per3_BoydBence

      I completely agree with you. The clothes they are selling cost a lot less to make than they are selling it for, and they could use some of their profits to keep their workers safe. Having 1,110 people’s blood on your hands should show these people that a change needs to be made soon.

  • CJ_Bute2boydbence

    I believe the CEO would be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories, since they decide where the company is located. In the introduction it states, “More than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories…”. After the factory in Bangladesh crashed over a year ago. Which brought lots of problems to the factory, so they had to fix these them by charging the consumers more for these items. I would only pay more for clothes that were manufactured in better working conditions. Cause then I would know that nobody died or got injured making this item of clothing. In order to make the factories have a better conditions they need to pay more for the goods. So that the customers don’t have to deal with it. We as customers shouldn’t have to pay more for clothes if they made people die or get injured.

    • Derek Bice

      I agree that it is the CEOs responsibility, and people always say that something should be done about the poor working conditions in sweatshops, but really, people don’t want to pay that extra money so that the people are working in better conditions. It may seem cruel to say, but if clothing prices were to go up because workers in foreign countries were given better working conditions, there would without a doubt be an outrage in the United States. Included is a link of a list of arguments that are for sweatshops, and i think that they are all very valid points.

      http://blogs.kqed.org/education/2014/04/11/sweatshops-fashion/

      • Luke_A_Period3

        I think you are right. The CEO is not responsible. You are also right when you say that people would not like a price increase. I believe that the root problem here is the minimum wage law. Because of this Law, we outsource jobs to less regulated countries and then tragedies happen. We need to bring more jobs back to America.

      • BellaP_3boydbence

        Even though it may be true that people will get angry prices go up do you think there is another way to get people in better working conditions without pricing up? I know people can be cruel and this is one of the many ways but if we can get people safe would it be worth it? “The slow pace of progress underlines the fact that few consumers are willing to pay more for clothing they’re used to buying for dirt cheap prices, even if it comes with steep hidden cost.” quoted form the article.

    • DorianM_3boydbence

      I agree with you CJ the the CEO should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in a regulated and safe environment. Instead of a unsafe one. If the government stepped in and made a list of guidelines it would help enforce the rules. We dont peoples lives to be put a risk for clothing. “another factory in November 2012; that incident killed 112 workers.” I believe that it is worth paying more to guarantee the workers who are getting paid to make are clothing should be in a safe work place.

  • Anna Betzer

    I think it’s important that we all take an interest in the abuse taking place in factories. Nothing will happen if we don’t acknowledge it and take a stand. It’s all of our faults for funding corporations that allow this to happen.

    • madisono-2boydbence

      I agree that we need to take a stand and if we don’t do that then not many people are going to acknowledge the issue that is at hand. But, I do not believe that it is all of our faults. Some people are uninformed about what the conditions are. For instance, before being given this Do Now activity, I knew that the factory conditions were not great but, I didn’t know that they were so bad and that a factory had collapsed because of the lack of money to renovate and improve the conditions. So, with that being said, I don’t think that it’s fair to say that it is everyones fault. Going off of what I said before with not knowing, I think that us, who know about these issues, must raise awareness, whether it be on a local or global scale. By raising awareness, it also brings up the question, “How are we supposed to solve or fix this issue?”, which is something we all need to start thinking about.

      Like I mentioned before we need to raise awareness, whether it be local or global, taking a stand will make an impact. So, I have two attached two links that help explain how you could start raising awareness.

      https://www.dosomething.org/actnow/actionguide/start-awareness-campaign-about-your-cause-your-school-or-neighborhood#

      http://ourrevolution.co/2011/09/how-to-start-an-awareness-campaign-for-your-cause/

      • Oryonah Ross

        I agree that people have ignorance toward the issues that been handed to us. They believe whatever makes the quick buck makes us happy. when in reality all it is giving us incite on how harsh these conditions really are. They clothing producers have their workers working long hours creating an unsafe environment. They are unable to withstand that many hours and its a burden to keep them running on two hours of sleep everyday. They are forced to come in even though they are bed ridden and not given the chance to rest, there should definitely be a stop to all the unsafe working conditions.
        https://globaledualberta.wordpress.com/tag/fast-fashion/

      • Shane Myers

        I agree that we need to take a stand and if we don’t do that
        then not many people are going to acknowledge the issue that is at hand. For
        instance, before being given this Do Now activity, I knew that the factory
        conditions were not great but, I didn’t know that they were so bad and that a
        factory had collapsed because of the lack of money to renovate and improve the
        conditions. And by raising awareness, it also brings up the question, “How
        are we supposed to solve or fix this issue?”, which is something we all need
        to start thinking about.

        https://www.dosomething.org/actnow/actionguide/start-awareness-campaign-about-your-cause-your-school-or-neighborhood#

    • emily_p_2shuttleboydbence

      I mostly agree with you. I think that we should do something, we should stand up and say that there need to be regulations, but I do not feel like it is our fault that this is happening. “For the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes.” (KQED article) Some of us don’t even know what is happening. I don’t think we should be putting blame on ourselves because we aren’t doing anything.

    • Trevor D.

      The article is about bringing prices of clothes down not about the welfare of workers in these clothing factories. i am not saying that workers should be treated poorly but im going to focus on the issue that is being questioned. i think that america needs to stop outsourcing jobs to foreign countries and we need to start doing our own work for ourselves. That is probably one of the biggest reasons that clothes are as expensive as they are because companies have to cover the costs of the workers wages. Even though keeping production domestic would be more expensive to pay the workers, the consumer would probably be able to get the clothes and stuff at a much more affordable price.

      http://nymag.com/fashion/06/spring/15735/

    • rocky_seeley

      I agree with you. There are many places that most of our
      clothing comes from and we don’t think about how the workers there are treated
      or if they are in a safe structures. We get all of these designer name label
      clothing and we don’t have to worry about being in hard times like in Bangladesh
      when the factory collapse it left many people hoping for help but never got it
      and still are suffering. And even though
      that this happened to people in Bangladesh these unsafe work places are still
      in operation because there is still a high demand for clothing. There is more
      intervening that is more forcefully to improve safety and working conditions in
      the workshops they buy from.

      http://www.economist.com/news/business/21588393-workers-continue-die-unsafe-factories-industry-keeps-booming-bursting-seams

    • Aaron B.

      Where my clothes are made is not a factor in determining if I buy them or not. If clothes cost more I would be less inclined to purchase them, quite the opposite of what the question was. If I knew the clothes were being made in a safe environment for all the workers, that would not make me want to pay more for that reason only, it’s still more money I have to pay regardless which would deter other people as well, especially those who cannot afford the extra cost. As long as the clothes are a style I like and it’s at a fair price, I will purchase them. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2384963/The-REAL-reason-designer-clothes-expensive-How-luxury-brands-raise-prices-increase-appeal.html

      • Alice_B_4boydbence

        I have to disagree with you, if only because I prioritize people over the size of my wallet. If you are unable to pay more for clothes, then it’s understandable, but the way you phrased your post makes me believe otherwise, and if I’m right, then that’s willful ignorance. Forbes.com (http://www.forbes.com/profile/jin-sook-do-won-chang/) says that Jin Sook and Do Won Chang, the CEOs of Forever 21, are worth 5.4 billion. Surely if some of their salary was put into a manufacturing budget, the cost of clothes wouldn’t increase exorbitantly.

      • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

        Aaron, I’m not sure what your trying to get out there. But I would pay a little extra just for people to live a little better. Plus if we continue we could make their lives better, by the increase over time. This article explains about the payment people get and how their lives were terrible when working for clothing.

        http://wiego.org/informal-economy/occupational-groups/garment-workers

      • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

        I don’t agree. We aren’t only talking about where you are going to buy the clothes, but the safety of the workers. I’m sure you wouldn’t want to work in a broken down place where there is a chance of potential death. The country at times, can be whether or not the factories are in good condition. In China, the country is a communist country, which isn’t the safest kind of living style. If it is made in a safer country, then so can the factories. That is the reason why I would pay a bit more to a safer and productive place. “Few workers saw the fire start in the chimney, and evacuated safely, while others died trying to fight the fires”. If the factory was safe, this wouldn’t have happened.

      • nathanl_period4_boydandbence

        So what your saying is that you are not willing to pay a few extra dollars so people can work in a safe environment, so that they DON’T get crushed by a building that has an illeagel floor?

      • Ryan_R_2BoydBence

        I agree with you. There are many places that most of our
        clothing comes from and we don’t think about how the workers there are treated or if they are in a safe structures. We get all of these designer name label. clothing and we don’t have to worry about being in hard times like in Bangladesh.

      • GianS_Per2_BoydBence

        Aaron, I disagree. I would pay more for clothes in order to save a life/lives. I understand that some clothes are pricier than others and some people may not be able to afford it, I get that. You should also think about the workers. These are dangerous and unsafe work conditions that the workers go through. I mean, I would pay more money in order for these factories to have safer and better working conditions.

    • Ryan_R_2BoydBence

      I agree! There are many places like that, and most of our clothing comes from them. And we don’t think about how the workers there are treated. We get all of these designer brand clothing and we don’t worry about the hard times in Bangladesh. We should take a stand and help.

  • emily_p_2shuttleboydbence

    The government and the CEO of the company should be held accountable for the manufacturing of clothes in an unsafe building. The CEO should be held accountable for even thinking of putting people in a workspace that is unsafe. They may think that the space is cheap and that it’s good because it results in more of a profit, but what happens when the building collapses? You would have to pay all the families who had a loved one injured or killed. How would that affect your profit? What allows them to have this cheap place is the lack of regulations, “allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their clothing” (introduction of the article). That’s what brings me as to why the government should be responsible. They have very few regulations and the ones that they do have, aren’t very well enforced. The government should be trying to protect their citizens, and they aren’t doing a very good job of it by letting people work in these conditions. These regulations should not be a question. There is a very good reason that they should be put in place; safety. I would not pay more money for clothing if they were manufactured in better conditions because, I don’t think that unsafe work spaces should be an issue in the first place.

    • ChristianH_2boydbence

      You hit all the points the need to be asked. Why they care so little, what it really costs you, what happens in these two different worlds. We all need to realize these questions and take actions, pay more,and help people keep their lives.

  • 18cloc

    I believe that the people who should be accountable for the making of clothing in a unsafe environment should be the government and the CEO. I think this because the government and the CEO know what conditions these people are working in and I feel since they know about the conditions they are accountable for any thing that may go wrong. If they know what the conditions are like and they know they are unsafe they should change the conditions so they are safer. If I knew that the clothes I wear are being made in a safe environment I would be willing to pay more for my clothes.

    • Lukep_3boydbence

      I don’t really think the government should be involved but I do think the CEO should be blamed. The companies should make guidelines and regulations to make sure the workers are safe and their equipment is safe. But when you buy clothes you pay for the brand and the item itself. We don’t really get to see what the conditions are.” For the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes”(this coming from the KQED article above.)

      • Luke_A_Period3

        I disagree with you, the Government should be involved, just like it is in America with the U.S. Department of Labor. The CEO is also no the person to blame, he is the boss of the Chief Operating Officer, who is in charge of the Day to day operations. And he is not the person to blame either, because he has to much on his plate to regulate every factory that the company is using.

    • emily_p_2shuttleboydbence

      I completely agree with you. The government is not putting any regulations on the environment and the CEO does not care. All they care about is making money. “more than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories” (introduction in the article) This is mostly European brands. Hardly any USA brands have signed on to this and that is because the CEO doesn’t care and the government isn’t doing anything.

    • CJ_Bute2boydbence

      I agree with you 18cloc that the government and CEO should be one to blame for all the people dying. When people die it, “allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their clothing” from the article. So that is why most companies don’t care that much. Since they don’t have to pay extra, plus we as consumer are giving them more money be paying for these clothes. That is why we shouldn’t pay more for the clothes. Also the goverment should enforce more regulations in these unsafe factories.

      • Caelen Smith

        I have to disagree. Why should we blame the government, the
        people in charge of the company are to blame. The fact that the factory was
        unsafe was completely under the control of the company, they should have
        checked the building for structural flaws. We allow big businesses to show a complete
        lack of morality over and over again. What if the government steps in, what
        will happen? The businesses will not
        change their practices they will simply pack up and move their factory’s to a
        place where they can get away with these practices. The blame falls solely on the
        business.

        http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2013/07/10/200644781/Bangladesh-Collapse-The-Garment-Workers-Who-Survived

        The real question is: why do we keep allowing business to
        get away with these types of negligence over and over again?

    • Jeremy H.

      I disagree with you 18cloc, it should only be the CEO’s who are at fault. Unsafe factories are the responsibility of the owners, the only thing some governments do is check up on them. Everyone knows that most companies have these forms of factories in different countries that are completely unsafe. Yet nobody stops buying them, so why should the government do anything? They are going to produce clothes no matter what a government does the cheapest way possible, the only thing that would change this would be the consumers. But that will most likely never happen because even if you are willing to pay more for clothes that are made in safe environment, a majority of the other consumers just want to pay as little as possible or don’t want to blame the retailers for something beyond their control..

      http://www.npr.org/2013/05/01/180154279/would-you-pay-a-higher-price-for-ethical-clothing

      • Alice_B_4boydbence

        According to pulitizercenter.org, Josna Akhtar, a victim who sustained spinal injuries and now suffers from depression, has “received no compensation so far, though some global fashion retailers have promised it is forthcoming,” which to me seems like a red flag and that government should step in, even if it is just to make the CEOs accept responsibility for this.

    • MaryBethD_3BoydBence

      18cloc, the government may have no clue what is going on in the factories so they shouldn’t be at fault. The owners of the companies should be the ones responsible because they are in complete control of the working conditions. These working conditions are horrible! The company owners should make it safer not only because the workers lives may depend on it but because their products could improve with better working conditions. I would pay more for clothes if they were manufactured in better conditions as well. This website shows how bad the conditions really are and it shows that even since the 1800′s there have been factories with unsafe working conditions.

      http://www.mylearning.org/factory-reform/p-3069/

    • madisono-2boydbence

      In some cases, the government may not know what is going on, and if that happens to be the case, we shouldn’t be blaming all of this on them. Like the governments, many people may not know these conditions. For instance, before completing this Do Now activity, I was unaware of how terrible these conditions were, I had never heard about the factory in Bangladesh, and once I read about it, I was shocked at how poor the conditions were. There are many out there, like me, who are/were uninformed about the conditions these people work in and may not even know where all there clothes come from, where they are made, etc.
      I have created a “closet tour” on Google Earth Tour Builder. What I did was I went through my closet and picked out some of my favorite clothes and found out where they were made and then created a quick tour of these locations. By doing this I got to learn about where each item of clothing was made, which was pretty interesting.
      http://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgICAsJXq-QoM

    • MarkL_3BoydBence

      I think the company should be accountable but the not the government. There are many companies who make products in foreign countries. There would be no way to find out exactly what’s happening half way across the world from here. If you’re interested, I linked a list of American companies who own factories in China.

      Source: http://www.jiesworld.com/international_corporations_in_china.htm

    • AshmeetS_3BoydBence

      I don’t agree with you the company is the one who hired the workers, at least they should be doing is giving them nice working conditions. The clothes you are wearing right now, they our made by someone working in a bad/harsh environment. I am paying a lot of money to the people that make these clothes, I wear today.

    • David_N_2

      I agree with you. The government and the CEO, but mostly the government, have the power to actually change these working conditions. If they have a decent amount of humanity in them, then they’d want to make the working environments safe and maybe even pleasant. Even with the decision and execution of such an action would require a lot of money. In one way or another the pay would have to be increased, therefore product prices would also increase, but being the people we are, we are wanting to have better working conditions for the producers of the garnets “…but haven’t been willing to pay for it.” as the narrator says. Everyone needs to pitch and and sacrifice a little for the benefit of all.

    • JoelR_Per 3_BoydBence

      I agree because the CEO of a compony should try to provide the safest environment to work with. According to: http://logistics.about.com/od/industryfocus/a/Bangladesh-Factory-Incidents.htm Building inspectors had noticed cracks a day earlier and reported these to the building owners. The building owner should have taken this seriously and put together actions to fix this problem.

    • Kyle_C_3boydbence

      Yes, I feel the same way that the CEO should be the one who is incharge or in trouble by the government. And should be fined or pay back the families that lost their lives and so on and so on. In this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work_accident it says that “According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), more than 337 million accidents happen on the job each year,” whether that is the actually person or the companies fault the CEO doesn’t get blamed or even touched for that matter.

    • CarlosR_3BoydBence

      I can agree to your statement to an extent, but you need to think about the people who own the factory as well, and why the factory is even in use if structurally unsound? The responsibility is shared between the groups of people in my opinion. According to the “Out of Sight, Out of MInd” section in the KQED Lowdown, “More than a few major factory owners are either government officials or have close political ties, allowing the industry to commonly ignore safety and labor standards.” The factory owners disregard for safety is only part of the problem. The governments lack of inspection and the companies that contract with these factories also are to blame for their ignorance toward the unsafe conditions.

    • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

      I agree, if this incident accrues it’s the CEO/ government’s fault. They are the ones responsible to their workers and if something goes wrong, they fix it. If they don’t they should be punished.

    • KaraP_Per2_BoydBence

      I agree. I think the government should regulate the factories better, but I also think the owners of the factories should be held accountable if they are not safe to work in. “last November, 112 garment workers were killed in a factory fire near Dhaka, when supervisors ignored fire alarms and prevented workers from leaving their sewing machines”( found on http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/ ) This is a situation that could have definitely been prevented if they paid attention to the workers safety. I would pay more for my clothes if they were made in safer conditions.

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      I agree, the CEO is a very important part of an area. They are the people who manage and help the certain functions. If they tell the workers and make the rules, then there wouldn’t be as many deaths or injuries. If they aren’t managing the workers like they are supposed to be, then they should be at fault. “People continue to work and die, while not making the best clothes”. If factories were at top condition, this wouldn’t be a problem.

      http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/11/14/bangladesh-factory-deaths-could-have-been-prevented

    • KayleeH_3BoydBence

      That is a very valid point, but I feel like the factory owners are the ones that should be held responsible. The government and the costumers should be doing what they can and not supporting these unsafe factories. The CEO’s just want their product to be made and the factory owners just want their money, no thought goes in for the workers and thats how three illegal stories are added to a building and it collapses. They are humans too being poor doesn’t make yo less of a human being and their lives should be more important than the money you are making.

    • Miguel_A_Period2

      Companies should be responsible for the factories since they are the ones who choose who makes what they sell. It’s not really going to be easy to convince billion dollar companies to suddenly spend more money for a better cause.

    • HunterE_Per 2_BoydBence

      Like I said in a reply before this one, the government can’t keep up with this. In all 50 states, do you think they have time to manage the condition of all of the millions of cities and towns there are? The government has too many important things to take care of. The people that should pay attention to the conditions of buildings are the city and/or the people that buy it.

    • Riley_R_1BoydBence

      I agree that the CEO is accountable for the unsafe working conditions in the factories. I don’t agree that the gov’t is responsible. The CEO should be responsible because they have the power to change the working conditions.

    • SydneyA_Per4_BoydBence

      I agree with you. I think that it should just be the CEO to be accountable. They should know what is going on inside these factories. I also would pay more money for clothes to ensure another human beings safety.

    • AndreaO_per4_BoydBence

      The CEO’s of these factories should be responsible for the things that go own in their factories, they need to be aware of their employees safety.

    • DorianM_3boydbence

      18COL i agree with you the Ceo/Government should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in a regulated and safe environment. Since the incident in Dhaka, Bangladesh,”killing more than 400 workers ” We need to take this serious and enforce rules on keeping a safe work environment so this doesn’t happen again

    • Ryan_R_2BoydBence

      I agree! This incident accrues it’s the CEO/ government’s fault. They are the ones responsible to their workers and if something goes wrong they have the responsibility to fix it.

    • GianS_Per2_BoydBence

      I agree, but the other person who should be accountable should be the people who run the factories. They are fully aware what is going on in the sweatshops, and yet, they don’t do anything to improve conditions of the factories. I think that the CEOs should also be responsible in overseeing the factories and the owners in order to achieve safer conditions for the workers, because they have the authority to make the workplace safer.

    • DevonD_2boydbence

      I agree that the head of the company should take the blame. He/She is the one who runs everything around the factory. They know whats going on but instead of doing something about it , they just stand around and do nothing. In the article it talks about the factory that collapsed in Bangladesh, and that they are only taking SMALL steps to fi what has and may continue to happen. This may continue to happen if someone doesn’t step up and say we need to make the working conditions in factories better. If I knew that the working conditions got better I would definitely pay more to know that the working are ok and there working conditions are suitable.

    • brittneyd_3boydbence

      I agree that the government should regulate factory conditions, but I don’t think it’s the CEO’s responsibility. The CEO may not necessarily know what the factory is like, and they might just know that the labor is cheap.

    • MaxP_3boyd_bence

      I some what disagree with you, while here in the U.S. the state government regulates health and safety. While over seas and even right next door in Mexico, their government may not be in the position to manage the quality of working conditions. And while the CEO is in charge of the company, he will most likely not be the one to make the final say in whether or not the factory should be built. It is most likely a building manager, and through many exchanges in ideas and locations ideas, the team of assemblers all contribute toward the final say. So it is not the CEO’s fault, but more of the entire brand’s mistake, since the choice is a vote from many different teams and managers. That is why i disagree with you.

    • MikeM_3boydbence

      I agree they should make the area where there going to make the clothe a safe environment. They wouldn’t wanna work somewhere bad so why make it bad for someone else.

  • Chase L

    Bangladesh has recently been thrown into chaos with the
    unfortunate events that have occurred in the past couple years. “112 garment
    workers perished when a fire erupted and the doors and windows were locked
    closed at the Tazreen factory on November 29, 2012, then in January, 2013
    another fire at Smart Export garments killed seven women, several of them
    teenagers, and then the Rana Building collapse on April 24, 2013, which killed
    1,127 garment workers.”(clothingmadeinusblog). These incidents have caused many
    riots and revolts forcing the Bangladesh government to intervene in the safety
    regulations of the factory working conditions. “the Bangladesh government
    is now allowing unions to form without first getting the consent of the
    owner.” (http://clothingmadeinusablog.wordpress.com/tag/unsafe-working-conditions/).
    This is the correct step forward to creating a safer working environment,
    because the owners would never consent to losing their profit margin.
    Bangladesh is headed toward the correct direction, but isn’t there yet. The only
    thing left now to gain is the support from outside countries that are buying
    these materials.

    • Lukep_3boydbence

      Yes I agree with you that it is the first step towards making work more safe for them. With that they should add guidelines and such to maintain those laws that are being made. But when it comes to buying clothes we buy the brand and the item.”For the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes.” With this we don’t always know what the conditions are unless we hear about a major accident.

    • Alice_B_4boydbence

      So, do you feel it’s the company’s responsibility or the government’s responsibility to intervene? Is there a way we could encourage businesses to want to manufacture garments in the United States? I’m completely on board with you on the fact that something needs to change but they are moving in the right direction, but I don’t see what else you want to do from there. Stores like American Apparel, who do manufacture here, are a lot more expensive–just go to americanapparel.com.

    • CJ_Bute2boydbence

      I agree with you chase, that we need to make the unsafe factories more safe. Since they are killing so many people. Just because these factories are making people die, they decide to raise “The price of these clothing by 20%” from http://www.npr.org/2013/05/01/180154279/would-you-pay-a-higher-price-for-ethical-clothing. Which means companies are making more money just by making the consumers take the fault.

    • MaryBethD_3BoydBence

      Chase, I agree that there should definitely be steps toward better working conditions. There are thousands of people that have died because of an unsafe working environment. People shouldn’t have to fear for their lives just so they can make a living. You won’t make a living if you die trying. These people working in Chinese factories making iPads for Apple are forced to stand for 24 hours; they are exposed to toxins and explosions. This is from the website below.

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2092277/Apple-Poor-working-conditions-inside-Chinese-factories-making-iPads.html

    • AshmeetS_3BoydBence

      I agree with the place you have chosen which have many bad working conditions such as Bangladesh, India, and many more these places our just horrible to work in. Just like you said in your post this is horrible a fire erupting in the store and killing many people. I am feeling very sad for these people.

    • JoelR_Per 3_BoydBence

      I agree we need to speak out to stop these accidents. These accident could have been prevented. One new rule that they are implementing is that all factories must have a fire sprinkler system and a strong enough water pressure to reach the top floors—rare precautions in Bangladesh’s 5,000 factories. These are steps to fixing this problem but more will be needed.

      Source: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304914204579397193214283758

    • ClaireB_period2_BoydBence

      Chase, I agree that
      companies can take more precaution for their workers safety. There are thousands
      of people that have died due to an unsafe working environment. When people go
      to work they should know that they would be safe and make it back home to their
      families. In the video is said, “Many families have gotten money back from the
      company, but sometimes it goes to the wrong family.” If the company had record
      of their employees many families would get the small earing for losing their
      loved one. Even though many people died in this incident of the Bangladesh collapsed, keeping a record would provide information in the
      future. In the introduction it
      said, “The lack of regulations
      allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their
      clothing, making it cheaper for people to buy the products in stores. For the
      consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to
      the labels on one’s clothes.” This means that the factories are making clothing
      less expensive and there is not enough money to get their company up to
      regulations. If it were my option I would pay a little more for clothing items
      so that the companies will be able to prevent incident like this from happening
      again.

    • Tclark-2boydbence

      Chase L,

      I agree with you. Bangladesh has taken some
      steps in the right direction, but a lot of change can come from the influence
      of the rest of the world. When major American stores like Walmart or Target say enough is enough and demand improved working conditions for the garment workers we see some major changes. Walmart is claiming they have made changes Bangladesh according to their global responsibility page on their website.(http://corporate.walmart.com/global-responsibility/ethical-sourcing/promoting-responsible-sourcing-in-bangladesh)
      They state, “Given the unique safety problems facing the ready-made garment industry in Bangladesh, we recognize the need for heightened attention and programs that ensure adequate building maintenance and fire safety infrastructure. That is why earlier this year we announced several enhancements to our Responsible Sourcing program in Bangladesh”
      They then go into detail on exactly what they are doing in Bangladesh and what they expect from factories. All companies need
      to be responsible with where and how they are getting their products to make
      sure workers in factories are in safe conditions.

    • CarlosR_3BoydBence

      hey bud, just wanted to let you know the link you have there leads to a 404 error

    • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

      Chase, I agree “A garment factory that manufactures products for international clothing companies collapsed outside of Dhaka, Bangladesh, last month, killing more than 400 workers and injuring scores of others. It came on the heels of a fire at another factory in November 2012; that incident killed 112 workers.” This happened because they didn’t have a decent place to work in. So if their making clothing for us and around the world they should at least get a decent place to work in.

      http://www.npr.org/2013/05/02/180557959/ethical-fashion-is-the-tragedy-in-bangladesh-a-final-straw?ft=1&f=13

    • Luke_A_Period3

      I agree with you, the government should regulate the working conditions for the workers, just like the U.S. Department of Labor. I feel that it is also our fault that we outsource our jobs, because of the Minimum Wage law, jobs get outsourced to other, less regulated, countries.

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      I agree with you. A factory that is not prepared or is too run down for evacuation can be fatal. Over 147 thousand people in china has died working in a factory that is not suited for safety. If we were to be prepared, then there wouldn’t be as many fatal things that can happen.

      http://www.triplepundit.com/2010/08/estimates-of-chinese-factory-deaths-147036-to-600000/

    • BellaP_3boydbence

      I agree with you that they are headed in the right direction and that the government is right to get involved. My question to you is how do you think they could gain support? I agree that they should gain support but specifically how?

    • Miguel_A_Period2

      Greed is something which creates money better than any other. If we really want to replace greed with charity, you just might have to create a whole different type of change.

    • JohannaS_BoydBence2

      Chase,
      I agree with you. The government has taken a step in the right direction. Now we just need to spread the word somehow. I wonder how exactly that can be done most effectively. A lot of people aren’t going to listen to something about boycotting certain clothes, so maybe make it more direct, and make it so the stores don’t have those clothes in stock to begin with.

    • DuncanS_3BoydBence

      I agree that that’s a good thing, but the government should do more than that. They should make the companies have safe work conditions, because the companies aren’t going to do it themselves.

    • Tayla_k_4BoydBence

      I agree,
      This could be a step towards safety. The people need safer working conditions because they are working hard and long enough, their safety should not be their top worry during their work time!

    • SydneyA_Per4_BoydBence

      Chase,
      I 100% agree with you. These people need safer working conditions for how long and hard they’re working. The CEO’s need to care of it so that they can ensure a families happiness.

    • AndreaO_per4_BoydBence

      I completely agree with you, these people need to have a safer environment to compliment the long hours they have to work there. They need to make sure these people have a safe environment to be in to almost give back to them for the minimum wage they receive.

    • DorianM_3boydbence

      Chase L Yes I agree with you that it is the first step towards to making a change.We dont want to have a repat of what happened
      “A garment factory that manufactures products for international clothing companies collapsed outside of Dhaka, Bangladesh” We need to make a change. We need to make the work environment a safe environment. We need to make outlines that the CEO of the companies need to support.

    • EmilyA_Per3_boydBence

      Is it the owners fault? The CEO? Government?
      Im thinking perhaps youre saying it is the owners fault for nit keeping the factory at the safest conditions possible. These factories are killing people. YOung women, young boys, mothers, fathers. These people might have families and will be missed. Loosing a human being is worse than loosing money.

    • LillyC_Per3_BoydBence

      Yes, that is definitely a great step lets just hope they follow it. I found out that Bangladeshi factories have always suffered fires and accidents, usually without attracting international attention. One study estimated that more than 1,000 workers died in hundreds of factory fires or accidents from 1990 to 2012. Not once was a factory owner charged with any crime, activists say.
      which is very sad that it takes such a big disaster to happen to realize that these workers need help and the conditions are not safe.But for the consumer, it’s not always easy to connect the conditions of these factories to the labels on one’s clothes.
      source:http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/30/world/asia/justice-elusive-in-a-bangladesh-factory-disaster.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

  • Alice_B_4boydbence

    Because the government mandates working conditions, it is its responsibility to to fix unsafe working conditions and compensate victims. Josna Akhtar, a victim Rana Plaza collapse, has “received no compensation so far, though some global fashion retailers have promised it is forthcoming,” and, knowing this, it seems to be the government’s duty to hold retailers accountable. It becomes messy, however, because the retailers may be based in America but the factories can be as far away as China and Bangladesh, so it would be best if we started producing more garments in America. Forbes.com (http://www.forbes.com/companies/hm/) says that H&M, one of the companies mentioned in the KQED Lowdown, is #30 on the list of the most valuable brands in the world. From there, one could assume that the CEO and founder of the company is making an extravagant salary per year. Were some of their pay docked and put into their manufacturing budget, the cost of clothes probably wouldn’t increase that much.

    I would be completely willing to spend more money on clothes made in America under appropriate working conditions. The two stores I shop most frequently at, Brandy Melville and American Apparel, both emphasize the importance of quality–both in clothing and conditions for their workers. On their about page, Brandy Melville says “‘Made in Italy’ stands for quality, where every detail is carefully examined,” and American Apparel displays their manufacturing footprint on their website (http://www.americanapparel.net/aboutus/verticalint/). Although both are more expensive than stores like H&M and Forever 21 (a quick scan through each website puts the average price of a garment from Forever 21 or H&M at $18, but American Apparel and Brandy Melville run more along the lines of $40-80), I prioritize people over keeping my wallet fat.

  • brittneyd_3boydbence

    The government should defiantly play a role in clothing factories. They should ensure that factories meet governmental standards. The managers/owners of the factories should also pay close attention to assure that the conditions of the factories are clean and safe. I do believe that the designers of the clothing shouldn’t have to take action just because they want their clothing to be made overseas- but they should choose a place that has regulated standards for working conditions in factories. This would help encourage laws to be put in place.

    People in countries like Bangladesh shouldn’t have to deal with bad work conditions, same as the U.S. I would absolutely be willing to pay more. I would like to point out that this may actually bring sales down though, so I don’t think paying more is the solution.

  • ClaireB_period2_BoydBence

    I feel that the company should be held accountable for the manufacturing of
    clothes in an unsafe building. The company should be making sure that the
    building is safe to work in, not the buyers. Even if the buyers do pay more for
    the clothes that they purchase it is not a guarantee that the money will go
    back into the company. This fact means that if the company was responsible for
    the incident. “There were no reliable records on who worked in the building or
    which companies had contracts which might bare their responsibility for compensating
    victims.” From http://video.pbs.org. This means that with no records on file there is no way of telling who worked for the company during the incident. With not being able to tell who was working for that company at the time there’s no way in telling who needs to get money for the loss of a loved one. After looking through my closet I realized that my
    cloths were made all over the world. Most of them were made in China, India or Indonesia. Here is a Google Earth tour of some cloths in my closet and where they were
    made https://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgICAsOOZvQsM.

  • GianS_Per2_BoydBence

    It is the companies responsibility that the factories are well-maintained. We, too, play a small role because we want cheaper clothes, so in order to achieve that goal, sweatshops are established with very poor working conditions. Many people do not realize the dangers of these sweatshops and the outrageous working conditions that workers have to go through in order for their clothes to be manufactured. Personally, I would pay more money for clothes in order to achieve better working conditions for these workers. The article states that small steps have been taken to improve safety conditions, but many labor advocates say that there is more to be done. There is still many ways that companies can improve the working conditions.

    • KayleeH_3BoydBence

      There is way more to be done, governments need to regulate safety, American’s need to make sure they are supporting having better factories, and factory owners need to stop being selfish and make it safe for those who work for them. I would totally pay more for clothing made in safer factories, the the owners/designers of lines like H&M do not want to do so. Sadly because of peoples selfishness others are loosing their lives.

    • brittneyd_3boydbence

      I agree. The company and the government should regulate the working conditions of their people. I also agree that buying cheaper clothing can solved.

  • AshmeetS_3BoydBence

    The responsibility should not be upon us, to maintain the factories….we are the customers we just need to be satisfied by the thing we get and pay them. The companies should be maintaining there factories and buildings they work in. There is a lot of danger in the places in the places they make all their shirts, shorts, socks, shoes, etc. These places should be more safer and maintained accurately. I hope they can make this right. I pay a lot of money for the clothes, I wear these days, but I don’t think these workers are still getting good working conditions.

    • Lbateman_2boydbence

      The responsibility should not be on us to maintain the factories, but most people care if over a thousand people die in a building collapse. Would you pay at least a little more for your clothes if you knew you were not getting those clothes at another’s expense? The companies that maintain the factories are not required by law to make sure that their workers have nice working conditions so the companies that maintain the buildings will be penny pinchers so that they can survive in this world. The companies that buy from those places should restrict themselves to only buy from places that have nice working conditions. If the companies that buy the clothes do this then the places with bad working conditions will make their working conditions better work the workers. What you can do it pay a couple extra dollars so that the companies that maintain the factories can afford to make the buildings better.

  • JoelR_Per 3_BoydBence

    The maintenance of the factory should be in control of the CEO. The government should play a small role in laying out simple guidelines that should be met by all companies this way we would have a bare minimum. This was not the only incident in Bangladesh there was a factory fire in Dhaka in November 2012. The fire at the n Tazreen Fashion factory killed 117 workers and injured over 200. We have to put an end to these. There are an estimated 5,000 garment factories in Bangladesh, of which around two thirds are active, so owners of these factories would have to help keep the factory in good condition to relieve some stress of the government. We should also encourage them by paying a little extra for clothes. This way everybody can be happy.

  • Tclark-2boydbence

    The condition of factories in countries like Bangladesh is unacceptable. We hear
    about big accidents like this one but even small ones have a huge impact on the people affected and their families. For example, a fire in a factory killed 9 and injured more than 50 in Gazipur Bangladesh October last year. (http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2013/10/9/fire-at-bangladeshigarmentfactorykills9.html) Another example is the 122 killed in the Tazreen Fashions fire (http://www.globalmarch.org/content/fire-and-death-workers-bangladeshi-garment-factory-raises-serious-concerns-about-workers%E2%80%99-0).

    Kailash Satyarth from Global march.org states, “Garment workers’
    safety seems to be of nobody’s concern. Neither the apparel retailers take
    proper remedial or pre-emptive actions to ensure that such untoward
    incidences do not occur at their sourcing hubs, nor does the Government agencies
    in Bangladesh wake up to assume their responsibilities for ensuring decent
    working conditions and basic safety for the workers” People are dying and
    being seriously injured due to lack of basic safety features and regulations
    and no one is taking responsibility. In order to prevent tragedies like this
    from occurring yet again, it is the governments job to set basic regulations to
    keep the workers safe and it is the companies responsibility to follow through
    with them. These rules and regulations would also need to be enforced by the government. Of course this creates more expenses, which means the prices on the goods created goes up. For me ,knowing that the item I’m buying came out of an environment where workers are treated right and provided with safety measures is worth a little extra.

  • KaraP_Per2_BoydBence

    The conditions in many of these factories are criminal. Taking advantage of those in poverty is not the way to make clothes cheaper. We need to have these factories regulated. “The textile factories are almost all locally owned and managed, allowing Western retailers to maintain a distance from them and turn a blind eye to factory floor conditions. ” (found on http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/ ) This is unacceptable, we need to hold the owners of the factories accountable. I know that I am willing to pay more for clothes that are manufactured in better conditions, and I am sure many other people are as well. If we stick together we can make a change!

    Also please check out this google tour I made about where my clothes are made in http://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgICAsMPyowkM

    • DevonD_2boydbence

      Kara I agree with you the working conditions are getting to bad. Like they said just a year ago a factory in Bangladesh collapsed due to poor conditions. We need to treat these factories better so that things like that wont happen again. Its is unacceptable what these workers have to endure every day at just there job. I agree that I am willing to pay more just so that the cloths I wear can and should be made in better conditions.

  • BarrettC-3periodboydbence

    I believe that China should be responsible for manufacturing clothing. They already make most of our clothing, and they already went through the trouble of making our clothes for the Olympics. If I were topaz more for our manufactures to live better, I would actually, but only a little. I mean these people making our clothes so think that we should at least give them like a little “tip”. “A garment factory that manufactures products for international clothing companies collapsed outside of Dhaka, Bangladesh, last month, killing more than 400 workers and injuring scores of others. It came on the heels of a fire at another factory in November 2012; that incident killed 112 workers.” So as for this quote we should at least give them a decent work area to work in.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/05/02/180557959/ethical-fashion-is-the-tragedy-in-bangladesh-a-final-straw?ft=1&f=13

  • ESigler-2boydbence

    I don’t think anybody should be manufacturing clothes under unsafe conditions. But to answer the question “Who should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories?”, adults 25+ should only be allowed to be making the clothing. I don’t exactly have a perspective on where the clothing is made. I personally would definitely pay extra money if it meant that the workers get a better working area. Clothing nowadays is already very expensive, shirts are getting to be $50, and pants the same, but if it meant that the workers get a better working area, I would pay extra.

  • Tosterhout_period2_boyd_bence

    A companies are responsibility because it is their company and they use bad building so they could make cheaper clothes. but poor working condition can cause death and like what happen in the building that collapses because of bad concert. I would pay more for clothes knowing that the condition that the people are working in is safe and it not just cheap labor to turn a bigger profit.

    • alexm_3boydbence

      I agree that is the companies fault, but i believe it’s a par of ours and the governments too. The government should have put in rules and regulations and we should pay higher prices so the working conditions can be better for the people.

  • Luke_A_Period3

    The government of the countries that clothes are being manufactured in are the ones responsible for regulating their manufacturers. Here in America, we a have division of the government that is responsible for regulating work place conditions, it is the U.S. Department of Labor. That being said, if we outsource our jobs to countries with less a less regulated work force, then it is no ones fault other then our own, when things like this happen. I would defiantly pay more for something if it had “Made in America” on the tag, however, at most stores this is not even an option with most name brand clothing companies. I believe the root source of this problem is the fact that we continue to send more and more jobs overseas.

    • KayleeH_3BoydBence

      I would totally pay more for clothing made in more safe factories. They do need to have people come in to inspect the buildings to make sure the buildings are safe and to not let people in it unless it meets standards. The designers need to take action to make sure they are only using and supporting safe factories but the factory owners should be help responsible for anything bad happening, not the government. The government does, though, need to check up on all these factories.

  • KayleeH_3BoydBence

    Clothing companies should be responsible to an extent for not paying the factories well, but the factory owners should be held the most responsible because they are making their workers work in unsafe conditions. The owner of Rana Plaza “illegally built three additional floors onto the structure and installed heavy textile machinery” (http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/ paragraph 10) With factory owners like that, they need to be held responsible. They are selfish human being who value getting more and more money over the health and lives of others. Human life should be above and financial gain. These men are blinded by their gain and until something bad like Rana Plaza happens they stay blinded. We need to help them open their eyes to what they are doing. Cracks along walls are not acceptable, chemical illegal in majority of countries are not acceptable, illegally adding onto a building is not acceptable, and loosing human life to the conditions of these factories is not acceptable.

    • IsabellaV_3boydbence

      I agree with you because not all of the time do the CEOs know the conditions of the buildings. They’re not always there, so that’s why there is a supervisor or a manager. They’re job is to keep track of the conditions of the work area. If they don’t report that there, for example, cracks on the walls and ceilings, then it can lead up to a much bigger problem, like the ceiling falling down. They need to make sure that the working conditions are safe for the employees.

  • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

    I would think that if the factory or manufacturing was unsafe in the first place, I wouldn’t want anyone to be working there. People in china are working their hardest to create what is 98% of clothes in America. Sometimes in foreign countries there are some unsafe factories. About 147 thousand people die in factories if it is actually unsafe. If I knew that my clothes was made in a safer and higher quality. A lot of times if I see on the tag that it is “Made in the USA” or somewhere in a comfort zone that I know, then I would buy it. I think that a lot of these depends on the own persons’ opinion and thought. If there are failures in the factories, then they should be the ones held accountable.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/MadeInAmerica/made-america-clothes-clothing-made-usa/story?id=13108258

    • Lawsonzper3boydbence

      I agree with you that people shouldn’t have to work at unsafe facilities. The way we fix this is we have the government regulate and then let third party affiliates do the rest. By doing it this way it would change sat the rate it needed to.

    • EmilyA_Per3_boydBence

      I agree with you, Daniel..
      If I knew how poor these conditions were in these sweatshops/factories, I wouldn’t have bought my clothes. I would want better conditions and pay for these kids/men/women. the higher the quality, the better they would be able to work.

    • Tosterhout_period2_boyd_bence

      i agree with you Daniel
      I wounding buy the clothes i do if i know that the condition where bad i would pay more for clothes if the condition where better for these people in sweatshops/factories.

    • taylor shropshire

      I agree people work hard on our clothes they should at least be able to work in safe factories. WOW! It is sad to know that factories are that dangerous and it needs to be fixed.

    • MadiT_Per3_BoydBence

      I agree. Knowing that people were safe while they were making my clothes gives me comfort to buy it. Keeping these workers safe should be what these factories are working on, especially after all the deaths that have happened. Too often are dollar signs masking the eyes of these owners, keeping them from realizing what is really more important.

    • GavinS_Per3_BoydBence

      I agree people try hart to make are clothes and they should not feel threatened when working on are clothes

    • AlexW_2BoydBence

      Well, workers in foreign countries that work in these poorer conditions often receive high pay considering other worse, less paying jobs. I myself would not pay more for clothes because I have to eat too, I have to wear clothes too.

    • Maeve_K_Period2

      David, I agree with you. You statistics are also very interesting. People often take for granted what they have and where it came from. Some of these workers receive as little as $37 a month! If people created more awareness for the issues surrounding clothing manufacturing in harsh conditions, maybe a change would be made for the better.

    • JasminR_3BoydBence

      Well, I I think it is the government responsibility to fix unsafe working conditions and compensation victims. Many big brand names havent provided ssafety to yourr employees. According to the PBS NewsHour Video “Most big American names didn’t join this group” into provide worker safety accord.

    • Cole Wierman boydbence

      I agree with you. I think the worker’s factories should be monitored with regulations to keep them more safe.

  • 18vmon

    The factories should be totally and compleatly in charge of the conditions of the factories. Workers should be safe inside the factory.

    • Lbateman_2boydbence

      While it would be nice if all factories were concerned about the safety and working conditions of their employees, we know from the incident in Bangladesh that is not true. The biggest impact we can make is to purchase from factories and countries that have better working conditions. If enough companies do so the ones who are endangering workers will have more incentive to improve working conditions within their own factories.

      • http://otakubosschick.tumblr.com/ JulieB_2_BenceBoyd

        Lbateman_2boydbence said, “While it would be nice if all factories were concerned about the safety and working conditions of their employees, we know from the incident in Bangladesh that is not true”.

        I Agree with you in every way. The supervisors and managers don’t really care about their workers at all judging from the resent incident in Bangladesh and the fire that killed 8 more people. The Supervisors just shrugged of the safety of their workers and only thought about the production of the clothing.
        By allowing people like this to run a major company isn’t good at all and should be stopped.

    • JohannaS_BoydBence2

      18vmon,
      I agree that the workers should be safe inside the factories, but the government should be in charge of the conditions. The factories want to be quick and efficient, so they may not care about the working conditions. If there were laws by the government protecting the workers, they could have a safer environment.

    • David_N_2

      True, the people who facilitate the building should be the ones who should be in charge of the conditions of the building. They should have scheduled times when they check and maintain the building. In the video, you can see that fire alarms and such have been introduced. Maintenance should be overlooked by the facilitators of the building, but if the the building was built to be sturdy and safe from the start, then things like this would be less of a problem.

    • DevonD_2boydbence

      I disagree with you I believe that the CEO should be in charge of the conditions the factory is holding. They are the ones that are in charge of everything . When I heard about the factory collapsing like it said in the article I felt that we need to take BIG steps to making the factories a more stable and safe place to work at.

    • JTM_3boydbence

      I agree with you on that one. But that cost money and the company might not have. so if that is the case then we as people or government does not have the power to tell them other wise.

    • Brent_L_Per1

      I think that if the government doesn’t set regulations then they won’t have any standards to be held to and the conditions can still be bad.

  • 18kgoe

    I believe it is the government’s job to create good working conditions and compensation for hurt workers,, however, if they will not, I will gladly pay extra if it means helping another human being.

    • MarkL_3BoydBence

      I agree. However, it’s not possible. The government in Bangladeshi doesn’t want to alter their conditions. “Contrary to popular perception, Western governments and international organizations can exert little influence on the Bangladeshi government or companies.”

      Source: http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/index.php/en/features/perspective/23620-bangladesh-s-garment-factories-still-aren-t-safe

    • http://otakubosschick.tumblr.com/ JulieB_2_BenceBoyd

      18kgoe said,”I believe it is the government’s job to create good working conditions and compensation for hurt workers,, however, if they will not, I will gladly pay extra if it means helping another human being”.
      I agree with you, it’s the governments responsibility to help create safe and healthy working conditions for hurt and non-hurt workers. A lot of textile companies are owned by government officials and Politicians and If they won’t take responsibility and take action to this situation, I will also gladly pay extra or more for clothing to help another soul.

    • Miguel_A_Period2

      Paying extra may sound nice just to save a life, but you could eventually reject the high costs and wish to go back to lower prices.

    • David_N_2

      I appreciate your answer. Most people, like the ones the narrator said, aren’t very sensible. They say they support something that will be better for people, but they refuse to actually do something. They would “…go somewhere else.”. The people in charge of the buildings do, in fact, want the safer conditions for their workers, but money is a problem. We all should know what happens when money is a problem: product price increase. I think we should all join together and sacrifice a little bit for the benefit of everyone. If all of us where to come to the fruiting tree with just a droplet of water, then that tree will be able to bear great fruit.

    • HunterE_Per 2_BoydBence

      I disagree. The government is not the ones that build it in the first place. It’s the people that build it (if they do a poor job at it), or the person that bought it if it were old and in bad condition. The government does not pay attention to the condition in which buildings are in. That is up to the city, or the person that buys it.

    • Riley_R_1BoydBence

      I disagree. The gov’t doesn’t decide the working conditions for the factories. The owners are the ones that have the power to choose the working conditions of the factories.

    • DuncanS_3BoydBence

      I agree, I would want the government to do something if the working conditions aren’t safe. I would also pay more money for clothes that were made in better working conditions. The article says “very few American brands have gotten on board” I think the government should do something about that.

    • LillyC_Per3_BoydBence

      In my opinion paying extra money wouldn’t do anything because the retailers wouldn’t use the money properly. I think that what we need to do to help solve this is making sure that we enforce these laws by having people come to the factories and have a check up on them.

    • Tayla_k_4BoydBence

      I disagree with you,

      The government are not responsible for what happens in these factories. The owner of the company or of the building is the one to blame. If there are going to be people who are working hard to earn a living, they should get better working conditions. The government is probably ignorant towards this issue.

    • SydneyA_Per4_BoydBence

      I disagree, I think that the owner or CEO should be responsible for THEIR workers and THEIR factories. They shouldn’t be able to hide behind the government while they take the blame. I agree with you that I would pay extra money to ensure the safety of another human being.

    • AndreaO_per4_BoydBence

      I disagree, the government is not responsible for creating good working conditions that the employees in these factories work in, the CEO of these companies are responsible to create a safe and healthy environment for their workers.

    • Petty_Period2_BoydBence

      the government shouldn’t be responsible for something that the company could easily fix. the COMPANY needs to step in, not the government.

    • alexm_3boydbence

      I agree with you a little bit. I feel it’s the CEO’s responsibily, but the government should have a little say in it y creating rules and regulations for the companies to go off of.

    • MarcusO_Per4_BoydBence

      I agree 19kgoe, it should be the governments job to regulate the conditions of factories. It should be a decision made by the owner, wether or not to make a building structurally sound, clean etc.

    • MaxP_3boyd_bence

      I somewhat agree with you, yes I too would be willing to pay extra to know that the factory workers are working in safe, and healthy workplaces. Although I do not think it should be the government’s role to create appropriate working conditions. The government may not be in the best position and be able to regulate health and safety like here in the U.S. Anyway; it should be the brands responsibility. The brand is responsible for the payments of the factory, and making sure that the brand’s head quarters meet health and safety were many people work. Why should the factory be any different? That is why it should the brand’s responsibility for the health and safety of factory workers.

    • ChristenW_Per4_BoydBence

      I totally agree with you. Since obviously the CEOs are not willing to regulate their factories, then the government should step in. We should boycott the irresponsible companies.

    • JTM_3boydbence

      That is not even the purpose of government in the first place. This is a legal matter that should be settled in a court of law. This has nothing with the public or the government so the fact we are having this desiccation is stupid.

    • CallieH_2BoydBence

      If they won’t regulate it, then who will? Certainly not the companies. They’re already proving to be pretty bad at their jobs. go look at that incident in Bangladesh. Pretty clear indication of how they’re going such a great job! Prices can’t be raised if nothing changes.

    • GianS_Per2_BoydBence

      The government is partly responsible, yes, but the responsibility and accountability ultimately falls to the factory owners. They already know that the workers work in unsafe and hazardous conditions, yet, they don’t do anything to fix it.

    • MichelleS_3_boydbence

      18kgoe, I could not agree more with you! I also believe that the government should be in charge of making the rules for the factories. I would pay more to have the safety of these workers improved. The government should regulate the rules and safety because most companies probably will not. The companies just care about money. A quote from the article above by Matthew Green says, “…very few American retailers have signed on…” We need to get more companies and whoever is in charge of factories on board with making factories safer for all workers.

    • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

      I agree they should step in and not be a bystander in this. It is really important to keep people safe during work in order to keep products flowing and the economy running as well$

    • MikeM_3boydbence

      I think the Government has a little part being involved with this kind of situation. They should only come to inspect any building problems but the full responsibility should be between the Designer and construction workers.

    • Brent_L_Per1

      I agree, with the price being distributed to all the products the consumer might not even notice the price difference.

    • IsabellaV_3boydbence

      I agree with you, but I also feel like it should be the CEO and supervisor or manager’s responsibility as well. The CEO should know how the working conditions are in the building that are manufacturing for their company. The supervisor also plays a big role into this. They keep track of the conditions of the buildings and if they don’t note that there’s something that can lead to bigger problems which makes it unsafe to work there.

  • 18tmon

    I think it’s the owner’s job to keep the conditions in factories. But some of the people that fund these factories are reluctant to pay more money so the workers could have higher wages because it’s doing so well. If consumers are buying it, they think why rase the price. That is also the reason that the people funding are treating to back away. I think if consumers spoke up more, or didn’t buy some products, they would be pressured to pay more.

    • Lbateman_2boydbence

      Why should it be the owner’s job to keep the workers safe? There are not the same safety regulations in the country that is making the clothes and if there are no regulations saying that the workers need to be safe then the owners are going to be penny pinchers and not spend the money to make the working condition of the workers safe. It should be the company’s job that is buying from this country to make sure that the workers are safe.

    • BellaP_3boydbence

      I agree with you that there should be safer working conditions, but do you think the government should get involved? I think they should because not all people want to follow the directions and they won’t. If the government gets involved people will have more of a chance at staying safe. Like the article said.”But many labor advocates say that not nearly enough has been done.”

    • ClaireB_period2_BoydBence

      I agree that there needs to be better working conditions. As
      it said in http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/
      said, “Bangladeshi garment
      workers, the majority of whom are women, receive among the world’s lowest wages
      – as little as $37 a month. They often work 15-hour shifts in unsafe, sweatshop
      conditions. Workers rights are few, and labor activism is commonly – and
      sometimes violently – squashed. More than a few major factory owners are
      either government officials or have close political ties, allowing the industry
      to commonly ignore safety and labor standards.” As you can see most of these factories
      shave relations with the government. If they break safety and labor standards than
      it is not a problem for the government. If we pay just a little more for our
      cloths than we do now, safety and conditions of these factories can be
      improved.

    • emily_p_2shuttleboydbence

      I agree that it is the owners fault. All that they care about is making a big income, so when they find a place to work that is cheap, they jump on it not caring about the safety hazards that are there. “allows fashion companies to pay less money for the manufacturing of their clothing, making it cheaper for people to buy the products in stores” (introduction in the aKQED article) This is all that they owner cares about. They aren’t considering that their workers are in danger, and that is something that should be fixed now.

    • HunterE_Per 2_BoydBence

      I agree with you that it’s the owner’s fault. If that person hadn’t of hired those people, let alone bought the factory in the first place, they wouldn’t be injured/dead. We should help people think twice before they start a factory in an unsafe place and hiring people to work there.

    • Riley_R_1BoydBence

      I agree that it is the owner’s responsibility for the conditions in the factory. They have the power to choose the location and working conditions of the factory. Sometime they have to force the workers to work in bad conditions because they don’t have enough money to have better working conditions.

    • DuncanS_3BoydBence

      I agree. the owner should be responsible for making sure that the work conditions are safe, and if they’re not responsible about it than the government needs to tell them what to do. I would be willing to pay more money for clothes made in safer work conditions. “In the wake of this recent tragedy, a number of European designers including H&M, Zana and Benetton, signed a new legally binding agreement to pay for major safety improvements. But very few American brands have gotten on board: as of May 17, only two companies” The companies aren’t going to do anything on their own, so the Gov. needs to do something about it.

    • PeytonP_4BoydBence

      I think the owner needs to take more responsibility for what is happening in the factories. I also think that not only the owner but the government need to be involved.

    • Tayla_k_4BoydBence

      I agree, the owner should take responsibility and make sure that their employees are working in safe conditions. If paying more for clothes is what it takes to ensure their safety, then I am sure a lot of people will start to help.

    • EmilyA_Per3_boydBence

      I agree. If the owner cant fix the factory at least warn people or evacuate the factory. If I were a worker, Id want to be safe than have more money.
      It is the owners fault if the people in the factory are hurt because they own the factory.

    • Petty_Period2_BoydBence

      Sadly, in some instances the factory owners dont have the power to do anything. They will hire maintenance crews, but they will put it off until its to late and the whole building is collapsed. At the very least, the company needs to warn the employees about the unsafe conditions and raise the standards as much as they can.

    • alexm_3boydbence

      I can see what your trying to say but I think the government needs to have some regulations and not also that but the customers should agree to pay more, instead of not paying at all.

    • MarcusO_Per4_BoydBence

      18tmon, What if the owner of the company was greedy and could care less about his workers? He/She wouldn’t change a thing that’s why they would pay more money just to lose it in the long run. That’s why the government should make regulations of these factories a requirement by law.

    • CallieH_2BoydBence

      How many people actually know what conditions are in these factories? Sure, the companies do, but not everyone does, or looks at factory collapses in Bangladesh, and come to think about, I’d never heard about that incident before we launched this project. It’s an extremely underreported topic. Go look in your closet. Look at your clothes, and then go look at the countries in the tags. How often do you hear anything about any of these brands, countries or anything pertaining to the clothing industry besides what kinds of products they want to sell you? So first of all, we need it to be reported more to people.

    • JacobG_2_BoydBence

      I agree with you, If you buy a piece of clothing that is $60 it could have been originally $4 where it was made from so there need to be some system that can help us decide hoe to price these pieces of clothing.

    • RaagP_4BoydBence

      Well, look at the big brands. Nike has millions of dollars, yet they probably have factories just like these in less developed countries. If they are money hoggers, then those factories should be looked at and shut down if needed. Not ignored.

    • SpencerH_4

      i agree its also the owners job to make sure that the facilities are good! they need to make sure that the facilities are perfect and that they need to make sure there okay.

    • ChristenW_Per4_BoydBence

      The US government should create laws that say that the US owner of a factory should have safety regulations for their factories out of the country, and in the country.

    • Tosterhout_period2_boyd_bence

      I agree it is the company job to make sure the factorie is safe for the work and i think that fast cheap fashion is not the answer to making a profit they should have better condition

    • GavinS_Per3_BoydBence

      The gov should make laws that make the us owner have safety regulations for there factories

    • MichelleS_3_boydbence

      18tmon, I think that it is not only the owner’s job, but also the government’s job. The government should make rules about the environment and safety of the factory that the products are being made in. A quote from KQED news in an article called “Where Does Your T-Shirt Come From? Follow Its Global Journal” by Matthew Green says, “The extraordinary success of fast fashion giants like H&M, Zana and Forever 21 lies squarely in the ability to produce a massive amount of clothing – billions of garments a year – in the cheapest, quickest way possible. It seems pretty counterintuitive that the least expensive way to make a shirt is to buy cotton grown in Texas, mill and dye it in China, manufacture it in Bangladesh, and then ship it half a world away to an H&M or Gap store in San Francisco. But when you factor in the dramatically lower labor and material costs offered by suppliers in developing countries, this kind of global supply chain model begins to make more sense.” The article goes on to say, “In fact, the “Made In …” label on your shirt, actually only reveals a fraction of the many places involved in the process.” This means that the workers in factory of the company of the product are not the only ones that might be in danger. The product goes through many peoples hands for processing, shipping, and handling. The product has many stops before it reaches you. Those many stops may have caused harm to someone or a group of people and we must not let that go on any longer. To me it seems very reasonable and a good idea to raise the price of a product if it is going to help improve the safety of others.

    • JTM_3boydbence

      I agree with you. This is the fact that the company runs there business is there choice. But with better working condition you might be able to be more productive.

    • Rachael P. 2nd BoydBence

      I believe it is the owner who is in charge of overseeing their factories, but the government is the one who could make a big change. While the owners and managers were treating their workers bad, the government was letting it happen. The government needs to set laws and regulations in place so that these owners won’t be allowed to do the things they do now like, padlocking the doors. If the government were to make laws then every factory would have to follow them whereas, if the manager took charge in making a change it would only happen to that factory. Therefore, the government needs to help. I agree with you on consumers should speak up. Sadly, many consumers don’t even know what is going on . If the consumers who did know what was happening got the word out and told others then a bigger stance could be made.

      • Cole Wierman boydbence

        I agree that the government should have regulations in the workplace.

    • Brent_L_Per1

      I disagree that it’s the owners responsibility, if they have no safety standard to be held to then they can make any decision they want. They don’t have anything to hold them accountable.

    • JacobF_Per4_BoydBence

      I agree, but I think that the government should set standards that the factories must comply with or be shut down. It’s partially the fault of the CEO who isn’t willing to spend the money to keep his workers safe, but also the government for having no standard.

    • Maeve_K_Period2

      I agree with you. The owner of the company who is having their clothing produced there should be well aware of the poor working and low salaries workers are receiving. I also think that there should be inspections more often to asses working conditions.

    • TrinityS_Per3_BoydBence

      I’m afraid that some of what you said didn’t make too much sense, but I understand your general thought process. Either the owner of the building or the employer should be responsible for the workers. And as my own opinion, as long as the quality of the clothes are the same, then don’t change anything about the price.

    • AlexW_2BoydBence

      I agree it is the owner’s job that the safety is ensured in factories, but I will now pay more for safe-made clothes.

  • Lbateman_2boydbence

    I think that it is the company’s responsibility to make sure that where they are buying from is a safe place for workers to work. I say this because in a place like Bangladesh there are not as many safety requirements there are in the US. It is not the country’s job to conform to our working laws, but it should be the company’s responsibility to ensure safety of the workers in the places that they are buying from. i would pay more for clothes that I know came from a place that had better safety regulations. I would also be happy knowing that I did not get this piece of clothing in exchange for a workers well being.

    • AlexW_2BoydBence

      It is the company’s responsibility to ensure the safety of workers.

  • MarkL_3BoydBence

    The government should have a role in the working conditions of factories. There are many companies that work under very unfair and poor conditions. If the government set some rules that have to be met, these conditions will improve. However, at the moment, companies aren’t very interested, or willing, to alter their work environments. As Matthew Green stated, “And although more than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories, most are European brands; very few American retailers have signed on, claiming liability concerns.” Most companies would argue that improving these conditions would most likely raise the price of this products. However, Most people including myself would definitely pay more to see that these conditions are met.

    • Lawsonzper3boydbence

      I agree with you. I feel that the best way for it to get fixed though is by setting minimal standards and then let third party affiliates join in. By doing it this way it would change sat the rate it needed to.

    • ESigler-2boydbence

      I agree. The working conditions should never be as bad as they are. We should have them in healthy conditions. They really don’t deserve to be like that. they work hard all day to make the clothes that we should all be thankful for.
      The governments should be doing something to change this.

    • Shemar_D_2BoydBence

      Yes the government should have a role in the working conditions of factories. If we just encourage them to change they probably wont do anything, we need to enforce things.

    • taylor shropshire

      I agree the government needs to take a part in making the working conditions better.Although I could see why you would pay more but the people shouldn’t have to pay more the government should take care of it.

      • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

        I agree that could change things up a little bit and make the conditions better. It wont be bad it will be good because they wont be stepping in to fight they will be stepping in to help.

    • ClaireG_4boydbence

      Mark, I agree that the government should impact the working conditions of factories. Factories cannot ignore the governments regulations so the conditions will have to improve. You brought how over 150 clothing companies have signed the legal agreement to improve the safety conditions, however very few American companies signed. I would like to point out that in the PBS Newshour they discussed how some American companies are not signing for liability reasons, however they ware making changes on their own. I hope that more companies throughout the United States, and other countries change the working and factory conditions.

    • GavinS_Per3_BoydBence

      I agree the gov should put regulation to make the working area safer for all who work there

    • Cole Wierman boydbence

      It is easy to say we would pay more. We are not adults and we don’t have a budget.

  • BellaP_3boydbence

    I would pay more money for clothes if they were manufactured in a better working environment. First of all I think that if people are working in unsafe working environments, they shouldn’t be working there at all.They should be working in a safe environment and I would pay more for people to be more safe.Secondly I think that the factories should be responsible to make sure their working conditions are safe and clean. I also think that the government should in force it because not all factories will be efficient with their environments. “It’s been a year since a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Small steps have been taken to improve safety conditions. But many labor advocates say that not nearly enough has been done.” This quote stood out to me for two reasons. The first was because the number of people that were killed and the second proves my point on how some factory managers wouldn’t be efficient. I would pay more for people to be safe and have better working environments.

    • PeytonP_4BoydBence

      I agree i would pay more for clothes if they were made in better conditions.

    • ChristineP_4BoydBence

      Factories simply have to be safer, which is why I agree with you. I would pay extra money for the employees to be better paid and in safe conditions.

  • Dylan_L_period3Bence/Boyd

    The CEO of the company who own the unsafe factory should be the one who is held responsible for it. Not even just the CEO, but everyone who is the head of the company. The CEO runs the company so they should definitely responsible for the unsafe working conditions. They often cram several hundred people into a typed factory and they have a legal working condition just of it is cheaper. They do not care about the welfare of the people they just care that they’re getting more money. “Khmom, 19, is one of the estimated 400,000 factory workers toiling inCambodia’s garment factories, the country’s biggest export earner. She recently lost her job at a factory in the capital, Phnom Penh, after taking time off to look after her two-year old daughter, who clings silently to her shoulder. “The factories don’t care about us,” she says. “They pay us so little, work us so hard and throw us away when we cannot work for a moment.” It’s quote shows how terrible the conditions are in factories.

    I wouldn’t pay more for close up there and better conditions in fact I would probably pay less for better conditions. More money should be going towards the poor condition so they can make those better.

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2013/dec/16/cambodia-garment-workers-low-wages-poor-conditions

    • Lawsonzper3boydbence

      I to believe that the CEO is wrong for the poor work conditions, And the way we fix this is we have the government regulate and then let third party affiliates do the rest. By doing it this way it would change sat the rate it needed to.

    • PeytonP_4BoydBence

      I agree, but I also think the government should get involved to an extent, and put more regulations to prevent his from happening.

    • JacobG_2_BoydBence

      I %100 agree with you the CEO is the only that should be held responsible. It could be there fault for making it not a safe work place. They need to spend a little bit more money and make the effort to make the workers feel some form of safe.

  • JohannaS_BoydBence2

    Being a 15 year old girl who doesn’t have tons of pocket money, I like cheap things. However, I would definitely pay a bit more to ensure better working conditions of the people making my clothes. According to http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/ , “Bangladeshi garment workers, the majority of whom are women, receive among the world’s lowest wages – as little as $37 a month. They often work 15-hour shifts in unsafe, sweatshop conditions.” The fact they receive the some of the lowest wages and work some of the biggest shifts (at least that I’ve heard of), and to top that all off, have awful working conditions, just seems crazy. Obviously there’s a major problem here, and they need to fix this. I remember learning about something similar in history. There was a clothing factory, and it ended up catching fire because of the unsafe conditions there. This was the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, it’s story is pretty well known and it burned down in 1911 killing 146 people and injuring 71. This is small compared to the 1,100 + workers killed a year earlier, but we need to fix the conditions in Bangladesh and places like this to avoid any more tragedies like the one the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory met.

  • http://otakubosschick.tumblr.com/ JulieB_2_BenceBoyd

    I think that the Government should be responsible because they
    are having their citizens to work in unsafe buildings.

    In the lowdown it stated that “Rana Plaza, the
    building outside of the capital Dhaka that collapsed on April 24, was owned by
    a local politician who illegally built three additional floors onto the
    structure and installed heavy textile machinery” by acting against the law he
    and the supervisor killed 1,100 workers trying to earn a decent living. Because
    labor and production costs dirt cheap, making clothes in Bangladesh costs less
    than just about anywhere else in the world which makes it the perfect country
    for producing garments at a cheap price. Many factory owners and large
    companies take advantaged of that and don’t really care about the well being of
    the people that work in their facilities, they only care about the money and filling
    orders for their customers.

    Further more, I would defiantly pay more
    for clothing if they were manufactured in better working conditions because the
    workers deserve to be able to go to work in safe conditions and not worry about
    whether they might die today. From the articles I read, working conditions in
    the textile industry for many countries outside of the U.S. such as china and Bangladesh
    aren’t as great as they say it is, may are unsafe and unsuitable for working in
    at all.

    Used sites:

    - http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/2013/05/17/who-made-your-t-shirt-the-hidden-cost-of-cheap-fashion/

    - http://www.ibtimes.com/where-does-your-shirt-come-1264967

  • Miguel_A_Period2

    Responsibility is a major issue in this whole ordeal. It’s very hard to point fingers and get the right person to blame. You could say that the factories should be responsible for whatever happens to their workers since they themselves own the facilities.

    You could also say that the companies should be the ones who must carry the weight and responsibility of the situation since they chose those facilities.

    Let’s look at it this way.

    Let’s say I have a lemonade stand with the best dang lemonade this side of the cul-de-sac. My lemonade is made on hand on the wooden stand it’s sold on. However, I decided that because I love saving money, I would go for some old wood I found rotting in my backyard. Sure, it’s good for making the lemonade the same as any other piece of wood would, but there seems to be a risk of the whole stand falling apart. One day, it actually does and the little Jimmy that I hired to run the stand gets a splinter. Because of my young age, I had my dad build the stand, yet it fell apart. He might not have been the craftiest handyman but it’s hard to be when you’re working with rotting wood. Clearly, I should be the one to blame for not safely providing my dad with actual wood. I went cheap and that caused little Jimmy to get a boo-boo. The blame is on me for choosing such cheap wood. This goes the same for the companies.

    Big companies decide to go cheap and use foreign workers which makes the product about the same as using “Made in the USA” factories but also adds the risk of the whole thing falling apart. But that’s just how companies work. They want to spend low, and make a high profit. The greed is evil, but it’s a necessary evil. If consumers want something cheap, cheap foreign labor seems to be the only way to go unless you’d be willing to pay $80 for one homegrown shirt instead of half for one made by those who try to make a small, but honest living. In fact,

    “And for all the concern about low wages and lax regulation,
    garment-making has delivered 4 million workers out of even worse poverty.”-
    (Fred de Sam Lazaro), there may be some good from all this horror after all.

  • Lawsonzper3boydbence

    I feel that the government and third party
    groups should be setting the standards. I believe this because when you give
    power to the government to regulate an industry they will most likely set
    a bare minimum to make sure that it is at least safe. Then the Third party
    groups can come in and fix anything they fell needs to be done. A good example
    of something like this is the food industry in America. The government says
    that the employs need to get at least 2 and a-half minutes of rest for every
    hour they work. But because of unions the workers are given much longer segment
    based breaks. Now to get back to the fashion industry if they made these
    changes then I would be willing to pay more for these conditions.

  • HunterE_Per 2_BoydBence

    The first question you are addressing is actually asking two different things (to me at least). I feel as though you are asking who should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unsafe factories if something bad were to happen, and/or who should be the ones to make the clothing in the unsafe factory. So just to be safe, I’m going to answer both.
    If something bad were to happen, I think the person that hired the people to work there should be held responsible. That person was the reason those people were there in the first place. If it weren’t for them, those people wouldn’t have gotten killed from the collapse.
    Who should be the ones to do it? Well, no one. No one should make clothes in unsafe factories. It’s not safe AT ALL to do such thing, and no one deserves to have to work in such hard conditions. Josna Akthar did not deserve to be under that building when it collapsed, and neither did the 1,100 workers that lost their lives.
    Would I pay more for clothes that were manufactured in better conditions? I don’t think you can know whether or not it was made in a safe/unsafe building. But, if I were to be able to know, yes I’d pay more. Because I feel like that it would help bring down the unsafe conditioned areas by making them not get the money they need, thus making them go out of business and shutting it down.

    • taylor shropshire

      I agree the people who hired them should be responsible but i think the factory owner should be as well! I disagree I think if we pay more then they will get more money and fix the conditions possibly but they wouldn’t go out of business.

  • Lihua Zeng

    @tttran32 @KQEDedspace The manufacturer is irresponsible for the workers.They should improve the working condition,make it safe.#DoNowFashion

    • Shemar_D_2BoydBence

      But they wont do that unless they get prodded by the government to improve. Sure they should improve the conditions, but they’ve had all this time and they still haven’t, and they wont.

    • Petty_Period2_BoydBence

      Do you think that the manufacturers really take the wellbeing of the ones they employ? Because in most cases, it would be a no. Most of the time everyone is more concerned with what profit they will be making not how the employees are holding up in there factories. I agree with you, they should defiantly raise working standards!

    • MarcusO_Per4_BoydBence

      Lihua, do you think that without being told by law to make conditions better that company owners would improve the conditions only to lose money? The answer is no they simply wouldn’t bat an eye at it.

    • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

      I agree they have to take care of the workers if they hire them.

    • JacobG_2_BoydBence

      I agree there need to be safer environments to work in and the only way that is going to happen is if they spend a little more money on the work place and make inspections for the building and make sure everything within is ok and not about to fall to the ground.

    • RaagP_4BoydBence

      I agree with you. But, what do you think that the CEO’s should do about this? I propose that we should have a board, where the workers have a say in what goes around in the work environment.

    • ChristenW_Per4_BoydBence

      I agree with you, and I think that there should be laws preventing factory workers from being harmed. As a society, we should not by products from unregulated factories.

    • CallieH_2BoydBence

      If the manufacturer isn’t doing the job already, what makes you think that they will just start doing it out of the blue? These companies pretty much only care about themselves and money. How do you make them up the quality of life if tye government isn’t involved? “In the wake of this recent tragedy, a number of European designers including H&M, Zana and Benetton, signed a new legally binding agreement to pay for major safety improvements. But very few American brands have gotten on board: as of May 17, only two companies.” This here is an issue. These companies are so cheap they don’t want to pay to make sure the buildings are safe! The only way to fix it is to make them because clearly they don’t want to or feel the need to do it. Strict enforcing of regulations would work wonders, I think. We see the food industries being regulated to the teeth, why not the conditions in these facilities as well?

    • MichelleS_3_boydbence

      Lihua Zeng: I do not believe at all that the designer should be in charge of putting rules and regulations on the factories conditions. The designer is most likely already busy enough and that is not even their job. They are not in charge of the building. They just design the product. I do think that the government should be in charge of creating the rules for the factories to keep everyone safe. Here is a quote from KQED news from an article called “Why America Stopped Making Its Own Clothes” by Stephanie Vats, “Today, the average American household spends less than 3.5 percent of its budget on clothing and shoes – under $1,800. Yet, we buy more clothing than ever before: nearly 20 billion garments a year, close to 70 pieces of clothing per person, or more than one clothing purchase per week.” This is very ridiculous that the companies do not want to spend money on keeping the building a safe working environment. America stopped making their own clothes/products yet we buy billions of products each year and have our products made in other countries because it is cheaper.

    • TrinityS_Per3_BoydBence

      I do agree that whoever builds the building should take some of the blame if something goes wrong, but there are a lot of circumstances to where there would be exceptions. If the building is just old and the employer doesn’t do anything about it then it’s their fault. And to make all the manufacturers be responsible is going to be a big challenge. Attached is a world map of the location where ten articles of my clothes were made. To spread that awareness for better working conditions would take a while, but it’s still doable. And if you want to reach @KQEDEdspace, you can put your post on Twitter.
      Clothes tour: http://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgICAsMPyowsM

    • AlexW_2BoydBence

      Umm. Yeah, they want to make money. To make money, in order to make money, the people have to cut costs on safety. Btw this is not Twitter

  • PeytonP_4BoydBence

    The government should play a major role in the working conditions in these factories around the world. How these people are practically being forced to work is very unhealthy. Matthew Green stated, “Although more than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories, most are European brands; very few American retailers have signed on, claiming liability concerns.” It is upsetting that others cannot jump onto the band-wagon to help these factories. If the government got more involved at did more regulation checks than these factories wouldn’t even have to worry about what happened in Bandladesh.

  • Jacob_W_Period3

    Here you can’t really blame the workers, or the designers because its the managers of the buildings that run every regulation. The designer only made the clothes while the workers are just abiding by their conditions because of the pay. The video states the growing industry and its benefits. It also says that people who work in these conditions are affected psychically. Like being unable to stand or sit for an extended period. Not even keeping record of the workers there. Like Illegal immigrant labor in the U.S.A because it’s cheaper but it comes with many issues. The people who run the buildings do not keep up with regulations which leads to health issues and conditions eventually leading to collapse. Many companies are joining to help build everything back up to regulations. Just because its cheaper doesn’t mean its better or safer. I’d rather work a 10 dollar job that I have to work at than a 3 dollar job that I have to break my back at.]

    I would pay more for clothes that i know were made properly than on a conveyor belt. Clothes Used o be made by hand one by one. Now it’s that but 10x faster leading to worse quality. However things could be far more expensive (like 3x the price) because of more money going into the new place. The US has an immigrant problem and they take up jobs like Landscaping, Prostituiton, and building. In this case it’s cheap hard garment labor. Prices should reflect one thing: Quality. Meaning how, Where and what is put into the garment you purchase.

    • IsabellaV_3boydbence

      I agree with you. The supervisors in the factories should keep record of the conditions in the building. If they did their job, then there building would be in great working conditions and would be much more safe.

  • DuncanS_3BoydBence

    I think that the owners of the companies should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories. They should make sure that the working conditions of the factories are safe, but if they won’t be responsible people than the government should step in and tell them what to do. “After the huge factory fire last November, a number of major clothing brands and retailers rejected a union-sponsored proposal to improve safety throughout Bangladesh’s garment industry” This is an example of when the government should step in and tell them what to do. I personally would pay more money for clothes that were manufactured in safer working conditions for the workers.

  • DorianM_3boydbence

    The Ceo’s Should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in a regulated and safe factories. There should be a list of regulations they have to follow like safety standard so the employes have a safe way to work and make money and . If we dont have a list of regulations we will have people like Rana making his factory unsafe and unregulated. And we dont need to people at risk of dying.
    ” The owner of Rana Plaza “illegally built three additional floors onto the structure and installed heavy textile machinery”
    I Would you pay more for clothes if they were manufactured in better conditions. I think we all should so we can protect the workers.

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      I agree. The workers have to be the top priority because they are the won actually creating the items. If they were to be harmed or killed, then there would be even more lives in danger from what already are. “There are now about 5,000 of them, employing nearly four million people, according to the ILRF.” If these factories were unsafe, these millions of people could either be killed or injured. If they are, then what will happen to the demand of certain items, and the economy? The CEO should be in charge of the safety of the people who work in the facilities.

      • Tosterhout_period2_boyd_bence

        I agree with you dorianM the company is in charge of the worker because they put them in bad condition so they are the one at fault if the work had better condition we they could charge more for the clothes but not put people lives in danger

  • LillyC_Per3_BoydBence

    Its extremely convenient and helpful for the brands and retailers to distance themselves from the proper safety regulations of the process in which the clothing is made. The system works for them they get incredibly fast delivery extremely cheap prices. Because of this the factories strive to meet the demand of these retailers so they are willing to ignore the rights and safety of the workers and cut corners. So when the disasters happen they act surprised when the reality is its the brands and retailers that have the most power in these situations . If they wanted to make sure that there workers and factories are safe they have the power to make that so, but sadly they choose otherwise. What they need to work on is ensuring that these things don’t happen again and make things right not making better escape strategies until it get to a dangerous point.
    My source : http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/daily_videos/garment-industry-under-scrutiny-after-factory-collapse-in-bangladesh/

  • Tayla_k_4BoydBence

    The CEO should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothes in unregulated unsafe areas. The CEO should not be allowing things like this to happen in our country. people who work for manufacturing should not be placed into horrid conditions in where they are risking their lives. These people who work in these factories are basically risking their lives each day by going there, and if they are not guaranteed safety how do you think they feel? I would pay more to assure the better safety of factory workers, this would make sure to keep them all in a well working environment and the money is for a good cause. “Fast forward half a century, the average American household spends less than 3.5 percent of its budget on clothing and shoes – under $1,800. Yet, we buy more clothing than ever before.” If we like buying clothes, it wouldn’t hurt anyone to pay a little more to help out others.

  • SydneyA_Per4_BoydBence

    I think that the CEO should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothes in unregulated unsafe areas. They should know what goes on inside their business, it should be there responsibility. There are mothers and fathers to families that work there, they work to survive. If the CEO can’t provide a safe place to work then you are risking a chance of ruining a families life and making matters worse. What if you said goodbye to your mother or father before they left for work and you didn’t know that that was your last goodbye? Personally I would pay more money for clothes to ensure a human beings safety and a families happiness. We don’t realize what we have until it’s gone, we are greedy and uneducated about what happens that isn’t in the U.S. “Fast forward half a century, the average American household spends less than 3.5 percent of its budget on clothing and shoes – under $1,800. Yet, we buy more clothing than ever before.” If we buy more clothing than we ever have before, then would it hurt to pay a little more to ensure a human beings safety?

    • Daniel K Period_2 Shuttle

      I agree with you. I also think that the CEO should be responsible of the safety of the people who work. In the KQED video, it says that MANY people have either died or injured. A certain woman could not do a lot because of the incident, she could not sit or stand for more than a few minutes at a time. If the facility was safer and in better conditions, this tragedy could’ve been stopped. We need to be more aware of what it is like around us to stop it.

    • ESigler-2boydbence

      I agree with you. The CEO should definitely be in charge of making sure that these peoples working areas. I have found an article on this crisis, as I was reading I read that “in recent years, however, the sub-standard, even dangerous, work conditions and low pay found in Bangladeshi garment factories have come under severe criticism..” I found this intersting because It shows that some action has been taking place. I think that the CEO could take this small action and make it something bigger.

      Read more here:
      http://www.ibtimes.com/despite-low-pay-poor-work-conditions-garment-factories-empowering-millions-bangladeshi-women-1563419

      • ChristineP_4BoydBence

        I agree with you. The CEO could do something much bigger with this rather than just adding a few regulations.

      • Guest

        I agree with you, the CEO could turn this into something much bigger rather than just adding a few safety regulations.

    • ClaireG_4boydbence

      Sydney, I agree that the CEO should take responsibility for allowing their employee’s to work under such unsafe conditions. If the government were to put regulations on the factories then the CEO would be forced to improve the working conditions. I also completely agree with your stance on paying more for clothing items, especially since we are buying more clothes than ever right now, if it ensure the safety of the workers.

  • AndreaO_per4_BoydBence

    The factory where these people were working at was clearly unsafe, even though they were getting minimum wage they still were happy with what they were receiving as their pay for producing a great percentage of clothes that later would be distributed around. These workers at least should receive a decent and stable place to work in, just because the owners of the factory just want to save a couple of bucks doesn’t meant that they can let their employees work in poor conditions, which could lead into the building collapsing on them, which was the reason for this while topic to explode.

    • LillyC_Per3_BoydBence

      I do agree with you that workers at least should receive a decent and stable place to work in. I do disagree with you when you said “They still were happy with what they were receiving as their pay for producing a great percentage of clothes that later would be distributed around.” I would said its obvious that they’re unhappy with their pay I mean their minimum wage is way less then most places and its not nearly enough for the amount of work that they are putting into this. check out this info-graphic it shows that Bangladesh gets paid way less then so many countries.

  • Ryan_R_2BoydBence

    I think that the Government should be responsible because theyare having citizens to work in unsafe conditions. I would pay more
    for clothing if they were manufactured in better working conditions because the workers deserve to be able to go to work in safe conditions and not worry about whether they might get injured or even die.

    • Shemar_D_2BoydBence

      Yes, some workers go to work everyday not knowing if they’ll die or not. We should give them hope that they’ll be safe in a place where they labor for little pay. The government is the best way to ensure this. I would also pay more for clothes made in safer places.

    • JacobF_Per4_BoydBence

      I think that its only partially the government’s fault. They should have standards set for working conditions, but they CEO’s should also be putting more money into the factories just to keep their workers safe.

    • Rachael P. 2nd BoydBence

      I agree with you about the government having some responsibility in this. They are letting the factories do these things in their country without stopping it. They need to set laws and regulations in order to develop safe factories. I also agree about paying more if it means better conditions will occur in these factories.

  • EmilyA_Per3_boydBence

    The factory owners or runners should be responsible because they wouldn’t fix the building. The government should also be responsible because they’re shooting for poor factory/sweatshop conditions because of the money. Saving money doesn’t mean its the safest way to save those children/men/women in those factories.
    “The workshop focused on the rights of migrant workers in Southeast Asia, Hong Kong, and Mainland China. The opening presenters provided their analyses of the conditions of migrant workers in their countries, as well as their recommendations. – See more at: http://www.wmd.org/assemblies/sixth-assembly/workshops/regional-networking/asia-labor-migrant-workers-rights#sthash.iTMGpIGQ.dpuf

  • Shemar_D_2BoydBence

    I think that the government should definitely have a role about the working conditions of factories. Because if we left it up to the factories like we already do there would still be heartless owners that make children make their clothes. I would be willing to pay more for clothes made in safer conditions, this would encourage the companies that make clothes in less safe conditions to improve their conditions. I recently bought an old navy shirt that was made in India. I found out that the gap factories in India have children as young as 10 working in them.

    • MadiT_Per3_BoydBence

      I completely agree with you. If we risk letting the factories decide for themselves, the chance of there being a change is slim to none. These children and adults are put in danger everyday by going into work, especially with conditions like these. There needs to be a price they have to pay if they are going to be risking these people’s lives just to make money

    • Nicholas_M_Period1_BoydBence

      I completely agree but I believe the UN should implement these rules so it is constant throughout the world and to further help the countries enforce these laws. Also it is truly atrocious that they have kids as young as that working in those harsh conditions.

  • Petty_Period2_BoydBence

    Governments should have a role in setting up working conditions of factories. SO many companies that work under conditions that are poor, unfair and brutal. Without the government, the quality of work will continue to fall. However if the government did chose to step in then the quality of work will defiantly improve. Sadly, at this moment in time, companies aren’t willing to improve what they don’t see needs to be fixed. Matthew Green stated, “and although more then 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories, most are european brands; very few american retailers have signed on, claiming liability concerns. MOst companies would argue that improving the conditions would raise product costs, and aren’t willing to do so. I would be more then willing to pay extra if you are helping save peoples lives and wellbeing in the process.

    • ClaireG_4boydbence

      Petty, I agree with you that the government needs to step in and enforce improvement upon the working and factory conditions. You brought up how most companies argue that improving the conditions would raise the costs of the goods, so they aren’t willing to improve the factory. I would be more than willing, as others would, to pay a higher price, if this means the individuals producing the goods get to work under safer and better conditions.

  • DevonD_2boydbence

    The one who is responsible for the building , the who owns the company, the CEO. The CEO is in charge of everything , so shouldn’t he/she be the one to manage how safe the conditions in the factory are. In the article it says “that about a year ago a garment factory collapsed and killed more than 1,100 workers.” Yet no realized how poor or unstable that factory was. I’m willing to pay more money if the cloths I’m buying our made in more suitable conditions. If it means that the workers can be in better conditions and work harder than yes I would pay more if my cloths were made in better conditions.

  • taylor_w_2nd

    The government should come step in and help set up boundaries for a safer work environment. In most factories, work conditions are unbearable and are often times to hard to work under. WIthout government help, the conditions will continue to fall because unless the companies have a reason to raise the standards, they won’t. As sad as it may be, the companies aren’t willing to raise the standards of work because that means that the prices of the products will go up, and the companies fear that nobody will buy the product. Matthew Green stated, “and although more then 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories, most are european brands; very few american retailers have signed on, claiming liability concerns.” The whole situation is sad if you ask me, nobody wants to raise the standards even though if we do it will benefit everyone in the long run. I can’t speak for anybody else but myself, but I would be more then willing to pay extra if it means raising the quality of work for those who need it.

  • alexm_3boydbence

    The CEO should be responsible for the manufacturing of the clothing. I do believe that the government should provide some rules and regulations that the company should meet, but in the end the CEO should be responsible. I also do believe we are in a little part of this. “SHABBIR MAHMOOD, Factor Owner (through interpreter): Whenever I ask the buyers to give a better price, the buyers say, we will go somewhere else.” Therefore, since we want cheaper prices the companies have to provide cheaper working environments so they can still make profit. If we all agree to pay higher prices for clothes than the companies might improve the working conditions for the people who make the clothes.

    • NWeix-1stboydbence

      I totally agree, the CEO’s are the people who manage the buildings, they should be the ones responsible for their buildings that they run. After all if you want your business to last, the building you do it in should last to.

  • ClaireG_4boydbence

    If the government can put regulations on hospitals or the legal ages to drink or drive, why don’t they put regulations on factories? Not only the U.S., but countries around the world, as well. Schools and doctor offices are safe controlled environments to work in, factories should be too. “Sometimes, I wonder how I can continue this life. I cannot do anything. If I bend to pick up anything from the floor, it really hurts. Sometimes, I say it be better to die,” said a young girl who was injured and lucky to survive the collapse of a garment factory in Bangladeshi. If the factory had been kept under better conditions and was put on tighter regulations, then the likelihood of 1,100 deaths and 2,500 some odd victims would be slim to none. If paying more money more clothes means factories and factory works get better conditions, then I would be more than willing to pay the extra amount.

    For more info about the factory collapse, watch the PBS Newshour video above.

    • ChristineP_4BoydBence

      I agree with you, PBS NewsHour states ” And how have the victims and their families been compensated?” the victims, like the young girl you mentioned should also get something in return. They were poorly paid, horribly injured and received little to nothing.

  • MarcusO_Per4_BoydBence

    Other then the owners of said clothing factories, the government that they are in should make regulations for the factories to keep other wise they could get warnings and even shutdown. If the government doesn’t do anything there will still be poor conditions for the workers of the factories. Sure the factories can pledge that they can keep them but “The industry has also pledged to improve safety and working conditions but there’s concern over how firm these commitments are, who ultimately pays for them, and how, even whether, they will be properly implemented.”
    “Source:http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/asia-bangladesh-garment-factory-rana-plaza-safety-workers-rights
    If the reason that the factories don’t raise the prices because they think they will lose profit I would pay more for better working conditions for those workers and i’m sure others would too.

  • ChristineP_4BoydBence

    It’s the companies responsibility that the factories are well-maintained, not the customers. I would pay more money for the factory workers to be in nicer buildings and get paid more for what they do. The conditions need to be better and although some rules have been set to improve this, it won’t fix much. As Matthew Green stated, “And although more than 150 clothing companies have signed onto a legally binding agreement to improve safety conditions in factories, most are European brands; very few American retailers have signed on, claiming liability concerns.” American retailers should get involved, and be a part of the change that needs to be enforced.

  • taylor shropshire

    The person in charge of the factory should be responsible for the conditions in the factory because they are the one who are in charge of the factory and they should make sure everybody working in the factory is safe. If people would work in better conditions I would not pay more because I can’t afford that, most clothes I wear are expensive anyway so me having to pay even more so people can work in better conditions. We shouldn’t be the ones who have to pay for that the factory owners should! The government should also help with the conditions of the factory.

    • nathanl_period4_boydandbence

      But the person who is managing the factory can’t control the upkeep of the factory, they don’t have the authority to spend the money for the repairs, that is in the control of the company that owns the factory. but if people aren’t wiling to pay more than companies will not raise the working conditions. You should decide if a few extra bucks is worth a human life.

  • JTM_3boydbence

    In all honesty I don’t really care about this matter manly because it is a legal matter. This is not the companies fault. Weather the workers told there supervisors or not If it was not passed up the latter of power then from the business stand point it was never communicated to the right people to fix it there for it is not the fault of the CEO. Well technically you would have to pay more if they made all the working conditions better would mean cost to make the stuff would go up. But for me I would not pay more because the labor they are giving is not worth more.

    • SpencerH_4

      i agree i could really care less but i don’t agree that its not the CEOs fault it kind of does put the fault into his hands and he needs to come up to why he didn’t do something about it!

    • NWeix-1stboydbence

      You seriously disgust me. They TOLD the CEO’s about the cracks in the wall and said it was a problem, their response was a “get back to work or your fired”. Next day? Bangladesh is down a garment factory and almost everyone in the building died. If they managed to up the security and state of the buildings, yeah the cost would go up by a little. And your basically telling me that a few more dollars tacked on to a price tag is not worth HUMAN LIVES?? You’re utterly repulsive.

  • SpencerH_4

    I think to stop this high money making companies need to put more money into there facilities there having people making them! if the high end companies like nike and under armor should pay just a little more for the people who are working on making there products. because wouldn’t you rather have your products that are costing 35$ to buy wouldn’t You want the people making them a lot more safe. Its more responsible for the higher companies to have a better facility to for the kids to work in! if these companies had better facilities maybe there wouldn’t be so many screw up clothes cause then people would want to come to work and make the clothes. its also just not right for these companies like nike to be having people work in environments like this and its not right because there doing all the dirty work but getting noting but 12$ a month.

  • MadiT_Per3_BoydBence

    The owner/CEO of a company should set guidelines and standards that every location should have to follow, and if not, then the person that runs that location should be penalized, fined, or fired. The safety of these workers should be the number one priority, not the money they are making, or how fast they are making it. Depending on my economic state, I would most likely pay a little more for clothes that were made in safer conditions. Although I would do this, I think that most people who not, especially considering our economy. It would be difficult for people to just look at a brand and figure out how they treat their workers so you know whether or not to buy it. This being said, it should be the norm to treat your workers correctly, not the other way around.

    • TrinityS_Per3_BoydBence

      I wholeheartedly agree with who should be in charge of making sure that the working conditions are fit for these people. And if the rules that are given to those people aren’t followed, they should be punished. I also agree that safety comes first and if there is no worker, there is no product. Personally, I would not give more money for something that was made in a better place, but everyone should still strive to create the best working environment for these people as possible. Below is my closet tour that shows only some of the countries where this could also be happening.
      Closet tour: http://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgICAsMPyowsM

  • CallieH_2BoydBence

    The government should at least regulate the industry. It’s a high need, especially after the crash of the factory in Bangladesh. The workers need to have the safety! I would be very willing to pay more, especially because I shop sales anyway, so it’s not that much of a problem for me. I’d jus be happy the workers weren’t about to die every day! However, “In the wake of this recent tragedy, a number of European designers including H&M, Zana and Benetton, signed a new legally binding agreement to pay for major safety improvements. But very few American brands have gotten on board: as of May 17, only two companies” according to one source. This is further proof that the government needs to do what they need to do to regulate and enforce their regulations!

  • MaxP_3boyd_bence

    A brand is responsible for many things, designing a new shirt that will fly off the shelves, managing money so they don’t go into debt, as well as health and safety for their worldwide employees. If a factory were to collapse it should be the brands responsibility. They are responsible for choosing the location that meets their priorities, and if their priorities do not concern health and safety, or regulating working conditions, than the brand should take the fall. Overseas, and even right next door in Mexico people are getting paid very little. And it’s sad that others do not have as good working conditions as we do here in the U.S. So I would be willing to pay a little extra towards the benefit of the factory workers, so that they may work in better conditions.

  • MichelleS_3_boydbence

    Governments should be in control of the working conditions taking place in factories. They should make rules for factories that should be met to ensure that the workers have a very safe environment. It is really sad that it took 1,100 people to die in the Bangladesh factory for many people to realize that we should probably have safer conditions. The factories themselves need to listen to their workers. If the workers say that something unsafe is taking place in the building, then the building should be evacuated and be thoroughly checked for dangerous things taking place. On a website called War On Want it said, “There are more than 4,800 factories and 3.5 million people employed in the Bangladeshi garment industry, producing cheap clothes under appalling working conditions for major UK and international brands.” I would definitely pay more money for clothes to improve the safety conditions and environment for the workers who are making the clothes. I do not want someone suffering a price just to make my shirt, pants, shoes, etc. If you are not willing to pay more money to save lives then that is plain selfish if you ask me. You rather have a shirt made for you by risking someone elses lives? Fortunately, more and more companies are starting to be be willing to make alterations to their factory environments. In the above article Matthew Green stated, “Small steps have been taken to improve safety conditions.” Lots of things have changed from the 1960’s to now. In an article on KQED news called “Why America Stopped Making Its Own Clothes” by Stephanie Vats says, “In 1960, an average American household spent over 10 percent of its income on clothing and shoes – equivalent to roughly $4,000 today.” The article continues to say, “Today, the average American household spends less than 3.5 percent of its budget on clothing and shoes – under $1,800.” At first this sounds like a good improvement that we have gone down in spending, but it is just the opposite. The reason we have been spending less is because we are buying clothes for dirt cheap. This has some pros, but the biggest problem is that we are putting thousands of lives at risk for this. The government needs to re-evaluate these and make improvements in the factory conditions to save more lives.

    I have attached a meme by John Darko about the situation and my post.

  • CadenM_Per1_BoydBence

    I think instead of higher prices improve the quality of the workspace and don’t forget about the product.In better places you could make better products and have a safe environment to work in with less dangers and less injurys.I personally dislike the over priced products and think that the very thin nike shoes should not be 90 dollars. Does the price go up as the work safety goes down?I would not pay more money if work conditions improved,yes it is a good thing but I woudnt want to pay more that I should.

  • JacobG_2_BoydBence

    I believe that the manufacturing of clothing should be up to the CEO of that specific clothing company because they are in charge of actually making the product. It is there responsibly to make sure that the factories that are being used are safe and have now questioning of crumbling to the ground. They should be the reliable ones if anything happens to the factory. The CEO only cares about making profit so if there is cheap factory the CEO will take it within a second because they don’t want to pay huge amounts of money in order to have the clothing manufactured. They will do anything to make the payments easier on them but harsh for the actually workers who make the clothing. In the evidence from the article, ” few consumers are willing to pay more for clothing they’re used to
    buying for dirt cheap prices, even if it comes with steep hidden cost.” This meaning that they will pay fewer if they are exposed to the harsh conditions that the workers work in. I think hat the CEO is responsible for and damage and loss that the family have experienced. There can not be a situation. that passe where a huge building has collapsed and there has been no effort to decide whos is responsible for it. There needs to me some sort of order and figure out who is really responsible.

    • Trent_H_Period3 Boyd?/Bence?

      I agree with you completely, The CEO is to be held responsible for anything that he may do to endanger someone’s life or create a problem for people.

  • Trent_H_Period3 Boyd?/Bence?

    I believe that the CEO is the one who needs to regulate the manufacturing of products no matter the condition. They are the ones who need to set the standards and regulations. Having these “dictator CEO’s” is something that we need to fix and to let them not have this position of power. I would pay a bit more for the product so that we can make these companies change. If we do pay more for their products we will be encouraging other companies to do the same thing just to raise prices.

    • RaagP_4BoydBence

      I agree with you, the CEO should be held responsible for these messes. These CEO’s should have some heart and look at these messes, and just fix it. They should put regulations in place.

  • RaagP_4BoydBence

    I think that the owner of the company should be held responsible for these kind of work environments. This is bad and should be illegal in these countries. According to a BBC source (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-22476774) People working in garment factories in bangledesh is through the roof. There are so many people. Regulations in Bangladesh aren’t that great. Some companies break the rules and yet nothing happens. When the people that died told their manager the day before there were cracks in the walls, the manager should have done something about it. Now, he is dead.

    I would not pay more for items that have better brand. It is just falling into prestige. Nike and Skechers compete in shoes, yet Nike wins. Skechers have shoes with memory foam built in, for much cheaper prices than Nike. When several people were interviewed about it on BBC (http://www.bbc.com/) people have no idea why they choose Nike, some people said that Nike was manufactured better, which nobody has evidence on it.

    • Trent_H_Period3 Boyd?/Bence?

      I agree that the owner is to be responsible for any actions that he may take towards the company such as creating unfavorable working conditions.

  • Guest

    The owner of the given company should be responsible for the safety of it’s employees. I believe that the United States should require anyone with a business to set up regulations for it’s factories. If we rely on the CEO’s to create these regulations out of morality, we will be sorely disappointed. If they are afraid that it might make them go bankrupt, then they should increase the clothing prices. We, as a people, should support this and buy clothing that was made in a regulated factory.

    • Trent_H_Period3 Boyd?/Bence?

      I agree with you on how the manager or owner is to be held responsible for any bad working conditions. The companies should have set regulations that promise a good working condition and enviroment.

    • SpencerH_4

      the owner should be responsible for what the facility looks like and how its operations work and do. they need to step there game up on making sure these building are in the right state.

    • MaxP_3boyd_bence

      I agree with you, I too would happily pay a little extra to know that people are now getting better working conditions. Raising prices on clothes and accessories is a small price to pay for people’s health and safety. Plus the brand is responsible for the placement, payment, and quality of the factory. So when those when any of that criteria fails, all fingers point towards the brand.

    • NWeix-1stboydbence

      To me it’s shameful that these CEO’s are able to dodge their responsibilities like this just out of a desire for money. In Bangladesh, this greedy lust for money caused a Building to collapse, killing hundreds of people and crippling a lot of the survivors. For example, Josna Akthar is a 19 year old girl who is in so much physical pain that she said she’d rather die at this point then be alive
      (Taken from http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/factory-collapse-bangladesh-one-year/). If we’re to learn anything from this it’s that we need to pressure them into making safer factories, and we can do that by simply not buying their clothes.

    • Rachael P. 2nd BoydBence

      The owner of the company definitely plays a roll in responsibility for what is going on in the factory. I also believe the government needs to take responsibility for letting this happen in their country. The government should make laws and regulations concerning the safety of these factories.

    • MikeM_3boydbence

      I dont agree with this. He might be the owner but he shouldn’t be responsible for the building. He should eventually have inspections but If the building collapses.

  • ChristenW_Per4_BoydBence

    The owner of the given company should be responsible for the safety of it’s employees. I believe that the United States should require anyone with a business to set up regulations for it’s factories. If we rely on the CEO’s to create these regulations out of morality, we will be sorely disappointed. If they are afraid that it might make them go bankrupt, then they should increase the clothing prices. We, as a people, should support this and buy clothing that was made in a regulated factory.

  • GavinS_Per3_BoydBence

    If we look at the big brand companies then we will probably see that he factories are the same as not as big of brands sand should be looked at if not shut down.

  • ChristianH_2boydbence

    “We first met Josna Akhtar last June in a hospital, she ahd been rescued after having spent two days trapped under the rubble of Rhana Plaza…Doctors said that Akhtar was lucky to survive the buildng collapse that claimed more than 1,100 lives and fortunate that ehr spine remained intact.” This here is only one of the many cases of the few survivors of the terrible accident in Bangladesh one year ago. This isn’t the first time this has happened so now we ask the questions again, who’s responsible and whats being done about it?” It’s on the part of the Government its on the hands of the owners and its on the hands of the buyers,” said by Roy Ramesh, and hes right. It’s not just the fault of one man its the fault of many. The Government for not checking building safety, the owners for not ensuring workplace safety and record keeping, and the buyers for enlarging these industries to the top.” All but the workers profit from an ovate trade that relies on low wages and lax regulation.” But not all hope is lost, “153 companies have signed a legally binding million dollar work force safety appeal.” Even through this small step we can help the work force, but not everyone is wiling to shorten the gap between reality and consumer.

  • JacobF_Per4_BoydBence

    I think that the CEO of the company should be held responsible for accidents that happen in their factory. he government should however set some regulations and standards that all factories are held to. I would be willing to pay more if I had a guarantee that the workers had better factory conditions. If everybody would be willing to pay a little more we would eliminate the need for sweatshops.

    • Guest

      I agree, it’s definitely the CEO’s fault. If they aren’t willing to spend the extra money to keep their workers safe then they should have to deal with the consequences.

    • Maeve_K_Period2

      I agree Jacob. The CEOs of companies such as H&M and Gap, who produce large quantities of clothing for a dirt cheap price, should be held responsible for the harsh conditions the manufacturers in places such as Bangladesh endure. One article says, “Simple: labor and production costs are dirt cheap. Making clothes in Bangladesh costs less than just about anywhere else in the world. Check out the graphic below to see just of just how dramatic the contrast is.” These sweatshops now employ more than 4 million people – all of which barely make a living off of their salary. All in all, money should be invested to improve working conditions.

  • NWeix-1stboydbence

    In my honest opinion, the people who make and run the Factories are undeniably responsible for them due to the fact that they made them, as well as it’s their responsibility to maintain the condition of them. However, often due to their desire for money, or just lack of intelligence, they neglect to care about the state of their factories. Even though it might cost more for them to be safer, I’d still buy the clothes as this time I wouldn’t be supporting people who care more about their paycheck then their own life.

  • Rachael P. 2nd BoydBence

    Imagine you are working in a factory. In this factory the daily life includes padlocked doors, 3 dollar pay, and abuse towards your co-workers. No one wants to work in these kind of conditions. Sadly, in Bangladesh these conditions are faced by the lives of many. These unsafe situations grew even worse when a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed in 2013. This accident caused the death of more than 1,100 workers. “It’s been a year since a garment factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers.”The government needs to set laws and regulations in order to make these factories safe for their citizens who work there.
    These people shouldn’t have to fear of going to work everyday. If the government were to get involved, then these factories could be regulated and made safe for the workers. For these better conditions the price of the clothes will raise. When it comes to people’s safety raising the price of things is a small toll. Raising the price will give them a higher profit in order to use for their factories. They will be able to rent higher quality buildings and the workers will earn more money. This extra money needs to be restricted to only making the building and conditions better. That way this money won’t go to the heads of the companies but to the people in charge of improving the factories.
    These are conditions no one should have to face. That is why the government needs to take charge. They must create laws to protect the workers. The profit from the raised prices must be strictly used for the purpose of making the work experience better. These changes will help people to feel safe and could even save their lives.

  • Brent_L_Per1

    Government regulations should be set in place to control working conditions. Many companies treat their workers unfairly and give them bad working conditions. If regulations were set in place these companies would have no choice but to up their working conditions and treat their employees fairly. The problem is, many companies don’t care about changing their conditions, because it’s too expensive, or they simply don’t want to put in the effort to reform. As the article states very few American brands have agreed to improve their safety conditions, even though many European countries have. It would require more money to raise these conditions but it doesn’t seem that bad when you realize these companies could simply distribute the cost across their entire product mix, and only raise the price of each individual item by a small percent.

    • Nicholas_M_Period1_BoydBence

      I agree that regulations should be set into place but so its not uneven in the different countries to where the companies will just move to where its the cheapest to produce the products; the UN should implement these laws and enforce them that way it is impossible for companies to neglect peoples health and safety.

    • JasminR_3BoydBence

      I agree the government should regulate. Many big name brand haven’t provided great safety for their employees. “The Wal-Marts, The Gaps have not chosen to be part of this critical process of change” if the company are not going to provide safety then the government step in.

  • IsabellaV_3boydbence

    The CEO of the company, the supervisor of the factory, and the government should be responsible for the manufacturing of clothing in unregulated and unsafe factories. The poor conditions of the factories are unsafe and risky for their employees to work in. The CEO of the company should know in what conditions their employees are working in. The supervisors are also responsible for checking out problems in the building and getting them fixed, and if they’re not then they cause huge problems. For example, the Bangladeshi factory that collapsed and killed over 1,100 garment workers. I would pay more money for clothing if they were manufactured in better working conditions.

    • JacobF_Per4_BoydBence

      I agree, but I think the government is to blame too because they have no standards set. If they set standards that the companies have to follow then it wouldn’t be a problem.

    • Nicholas_M_Period1_BoydBence

      I absolutely agree with you. It is horrible that people are dying so companies can save some money. It is obvious that these companies are valuing money over peoples lives. We should get the UN to step in and decide on international laws regarding safety regulations for these workers.

    • JasminR_3BoydBence

      I agree with you the COE, supervisor and the government should be responsible. Josna Akhtar, the victim of the collapse of the Rana Plaza. she has” received no compensation so, though some global fashion retailers have promised it is forthcoming” knowing that she hasn’t got an compensation yet is ridiculous and the government should step in.

  • Nicholas_M_Period1_BoydBence

    I believe the UN needs to step in and require conditions to be met before a factory can open up and have workers inside. If they don’t follow the guidelines they are shut down and are fined heavily. This ensures safety for employees and incentive for the employers to follow these guidelines. I also would suggest the government of the countries that are heavily affected by this to offer tax breaks to companies who will pay their workers above a certain wage. This will benefit both the workers and the company. Through these methods I believe we can help these families who are stuck working at these dangerous jobs.

  • TrinityS_Per3_BoydBence

    To answer the first question, I believe that both the owner of the building and the supervisor of the workers should be responsible for the condition of the workers. If something happens to the building with people inside, then it was the fault of the land owner that he didn’t spot or fix the mistake before it happened. But if the land owner had pointed out something dangerous and the employer does nothing to solve it,then it’s his fault. Even though I was unable to to find solid evidence to help me support my statement, most it it’s logic. Someone has to be responsible and there are two main people for where the blame can fall. In an article that helps insure safe factory work, one of the tips says, “If it’s something the builder can put right, you should probably give them a chance to do this. If you don’t pay the builder, they may take you to court to claim what they think you owe them.” Although this is an American thing, movements can be held so that builders and building managers can be held responsible. Some want to blame the outsources like Walmart, Target, and others but they don’t know what the working conditions are like. They can’t stop the supervisors from continuing to make people work. They just order the products that are made in those factories. There is an article from NCWTV.com that tries to explain what happened in Bangladesh and one of the reasons why the building collapsed was, “The building wasn’t constructed for industrial use and the heavy garment factory machinery contributed to the building collapse.” The people who order the clothes couldn’t have done anything to stop this aside from ceasing to purchase clothes from that location, which would put them out of business.

    For the second question, I personally would not pay more attention to or pay more money for clothes that were produced under better conditions. Sure I might feel better about buying that article of clothing and no I don’t support the harsh conditions, but as long as the quality is at the same standard, it wouldn’t make a difference. There are probably people who will say that I don’t care about human rights or that I support the harsh conditions, but just how animal rights and poverty aren’t in the biggest interest of some, working conditions aren’t at the top of my “care list”. But below is a comic that I find accurately represents the topic and relations that people who buy clothes have with the people who make them. Also attached is a world tour of ten articles of clothing that I own and where they were made. That means that if clothing is made in multiple countries, then these conditions can be there as well.

    Laws of buildings: http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/scotland/consumer_s/consumer_builders_and_home_improvements_e/consumer_problems_with_poor_quality_work_e/consumer_poor_quality_work_e/unsafe_and_dangerous_building_work.htm
    NCWTV.com: http://ncwtv.com/nn/there-were-huge-construction-flaws-in-the-bangladesh-factory-that-collapsed-7131/
    Clothing tour: http://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/builder#play/ahJzfmd3ZWItdG91cmJ1aWxkZXJyEQsSBFRvdXIYgICAsMPyowsM

  • AlexW_2BoydBence

    To us americans $3 a day seems like nothing. However in Bangladesh, $3 per day can keep you on your feet. Factory conditions may be poor, but if the company wants to make the conditions better they should not be forced into it by the government. If the people really want better conditions they can go on strike. I’m not going to pay more for clothes because of some people are complaining that other people are working in poor conditions.

  • MikeM_3boydbence

    I think if anyone is responsible it is going to be the people who made the building and the designers. The construction workers are trained professionals who should make sure they do there work correctly. Also the designers should make sure there designs make sense and aren’t to complicated to build for a usual building to make clothing.

  • Maeve_K_Period2

    I think that the owner of the companies and large name brands that are producing their products in these dangerous warehouses should be held responsible. They put people in very dangerous working conditions and, pay them very little to do so. One article says, “Bangladeshi garment workers, the majority of whom are women, receive among the world’s lowest wages – as little as $37 a month. They often work 15-hour shifts in unsafe, sweatshop conditions.” Also, this doesn’t only occur with clothing, but with technology manufacturing as well. Companies such as Apple have been known to utilize dangerous factories in China and Japan to mass-produce their iDevices for a large market. If these companies want their products to be produced on a large scale, at little cost, they should at least invest the money to improve working conditions. Overall, I think that working conditions should be improved and more safety regulations should be implemented to aid the hardworking men and women who make the clothes of your back.

  • JasminR_3BoydBence

    I think it is the government
    responsibility to fix unsafe working conditions and compensation victims. It is
    unfair and not right for Josna Akhtar, a victim of the collapse of Rana Plaza.
    She has “received no compensation so far, though some global fashion retailers
    have promised it is forthcoming,” and knowing this it only seems right for the
    governments to hold the retailers accountable.
    We do run in to some implication because many retailers are based in
    American, but the factories in China and Bangladesh. It would help if America
    starts producing and manufacture there. Or sign onto a worker safety accord. “European brands have acted more responsibly;
    153 companies recently signed onto a legally binding multimillion-dollar worker
    safety accord to respect and bring all factories up to international building
    standards.” Many big American businesses have not taken this in to
    consideration. Brands and business such as Wal-Mart and gaps, but some have
    like H&M, Calvin Klein, and Tommy Hilfiger. Company brand often don’t take
    this into come consideration they don’t want to spend the money. I would be
    willing to spend a lot more on my clothing to give these employees safer
    working conditions. If business/brand takes this initiative to spend a little
    more money we won’t run into any injuries for the employees.

  • JayWolf

    I think that It’s the owners job to make a good environment for people to work so they’ll be more efficient and when the owner is not even being safe it’s time for basic government intervention

  • Sierra Spring

    I think that it’s not only the owner’s job to make sure that the conditions are safe, but it’s also the government’s responsibility. The owner should be the one held responsible for anything wrong at all with their factories, and the government should be help responsible for making sure that each and every factory owner is making an effort to ensure their worker’s safety. It’s not just the workers that suffer if they are hurt or die in an accident, their families also experience the burden of it all.

  • Cole Wierman boydbence

    “When prices were 20 percent or as much as 50 percent more than the regular socks, about a quarter of shoppers chose to pay more, “at least in part motivated by ethical concerns.” This is a interesting study
    http://www.npr.org/2013/05/01/180154279/would-you-pay-a-higher-price-for-ethical-clothing