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Are You Willing to Alter Your Fashion for Ethics? (Do Now #81)

| May 17, 2013 | 314 Comments
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To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDEdspace and end it with #DoNowFashion

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.


Do Now

Would you pay more for clothes if they were manufactured ethically i.e. produced in a factory with fair working conditions and wages? What would ethical shopping look like to you?

Before answering, look at a garment that you recently purchased and find out the brand and where it was made. Take a picture and tweet it with the info (or post it in the comments section below).

Introduction

Two weeks ago, KQED Do Now examined the human cost of making clothing cheaply, stating that U.S. fashion companies design their merchandise in the United States and then outsource the labor in countries like Bangladesh where workers are paid very little to sew the garments. Has the tragedy in Bangladesh changed our thinking? Have we made the connection between the cost of clothes and the conditions of these factories? Are we ready to acknowledge the human costs of this relentless fashion treadmill and shop ethically? If workers are to be paid a living wage, would we be prepared to pay more for clothes?

Take a look at the label on your latest bargain, those trendy, cheap items from stores such as H&M, Esprit, Lee, Wrangler, Nike, J.C. Penney and Wal-Mart. Where were these clothes made?

In her book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion, journalist Elizabeth L. Cline describes buying “seven pairs of $7 shoes” at Kmart and admits to being a “reformed fast-fashion junkie. She writes “because of low prices, chasing trends is now a mass activity, accessible to anyone with a few bucks to spare.” Fashion trends dangle the constant lure of display and self branding in front of us and the drive to keep up becomes relentless. Quality is not the issue, but the fear of losing face in the social mirror.

There is now an “ethical fashion” movement and clothing companies like H&M, for example, has a “Conscious Collection.” American Apparel and Fair Trade Fashion offer natural, organic cotton or hand made clothing and sweatshop free production. Is then organic and locally produced clothing a way of shopping ethically? Does it also become a marketing strategy?

Another option is to follow Cline’s advice to “make, alter and mend” by which she means buying recycled clothes and taking care of the clothes we have, rather than discarding clothing on a whim because they are cheap and easily replaceable when the fashion moves on.

This could be a sustainable solution to the damage to the environment of endless stuff, which is disposable and easily replaced by yet more and cheaper versions of the same. But is it a choice we are ready to make?

Resource

PBS NewsHour video Global Garment Industry Scrutiny After Bangladesh Disaster – Apr. 29, 2013
More than 300 people died last week after an eight-story garment factory collapsed in Bangladesh. Rescue crews have pulled more than 80 survivors from the rubble. A local television station released video of police inspecting the site a day before the deadly collapse. Large cracks were visible, but factories continued operating. According to reports, some of the factories at the site made clothing for several major retailers in North America. Teachers: Show students the first 1:56 minutes of this video. There are great discussion questions provided on the PBS NewsHour Extra website.


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDedspace and end it with #DoNowFashion

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.

We encourage students to reply to other people’s tweets to foster more of a conversation. Also, if students tweet their personal opinions, ask them to support their ideas with links to interesting/credible articles online (adding a nice research component) or retweet other people’s ideas that they agree/disagree/find amusing. We also value student-produced media linked to their tweets like memes or more extensive blog posts to represent their ideas. Of course, do as you can…and any contribution is most welcomed.


More Resources

KQED’s The Lowdown post Who Made Your T-Shirt? The Hidden Cost of Cheap Fashion – May 17, 2013
Everyone likes a good deal. And for that reason, most of us have flocked to clothing stores like H&M and Old Navy for the unbelievably cheap and expansive selection they offer. T-shirts for five bucks; jeans and dresses for under $20. It’s almost like you can’t afford to not buy it. Clothing is cheaper now than it’s ever been: today average Americans spend less than four percent of their total income on their wardrobes, about half what was spent 50 years ago, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

PBS NewsHour Extra post Popular Clothing Brands React to Bangladesh Tragedy – May 8, 2013
Representatives from 40 clothing retailers, including H&M, Nike and Gap, met with the Bangladesh garment association last week to address the labor issues highlighted by the deadly collapse of the Rana Plaza, a large multi-story complex that housed shops and garment factories. More than 650 people died in the April 24 disaster, and the number is still rising.

The Guardian post How activism forced Nike to change its ethical game – July 6, 2012
Twenty years of campaigning for workers’ rights changed the corporate culture of one of the world’s biggest brands – and the sportswear industry


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Category: Do Now, Do Now: Government and Civics

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About the Author ()

Maxine Einhorn is from London and has lived in the Bay Area for 12 years. She has worked in adult education in London,UK, for over twenty years as a tenured instructor and department manager. She has an MA in Film and TV from University of London and has taught, moderated and appraised academic work in film studies and media literacy at undergraduate and college level. She runs the ESL/ Post Secondary project at KQED which offers media-rich resources for and created by ESL educators.
  • http://education.kqed.org Sara S.

    I get a lot of my clothes from American Eagle. The tee shirt I am wearing was made in Vietnam. I would pay more money for clothes that were made in places that had safe and clean working conditions. In would not matter to me where the clothes were made, ie United States or Vietnam, as long as I knew the factories were safe and the employees were making a fair wage.

    • Giulia

      I really agree with you! I think that most of people don’t know what are the conditions of people who made clothes for markets.. :( Now that I know I will give more attention on what I buy!

  • http://education.kqed.org Sara S.

    I get a lot of my clothes from American Eagle. The tee shirt I am wearing was made in Vietnam. I would pay more money for clothes that were made in places that had safe and clean working conditions. In would not matter to me where the clothes were made, ie United States or Vietnam, as long as I knew the factories were safe and the employees were making a fair wage.

    • Giulia

      I really agree with you! I think that most of people don’t know what are the conditions of people who made clothes for markets.. :( Now that I know I will give more attention on what I buy!

  • Paige K

    I think that knowing where and how my clothes are made would definitely dictate what I buy. Unfortunately, this isn’t commonplace — we’re often in the dark as to the processes that make our clothes and it can be difficult to track it down. However, I would definitely consider buying from a store that truthfully advertises their factories and factory conditions. I’m not a very fashionable person in the first place and I could change my look, depending on if the outfit just looks put together in general. It’d be easier for me to switch to a different brand than others.

    • Alis Manoogian_2

      I agree. If stores were willing to advertise where and who makes their clothing, I would be more likely to purchase merchandise from their store. Although it can be difficult to find relatively inexpensive, trendy clothing made in America, I think it is even harder to know for sure who is working in the clothing factories and their conditions. I find my own style as being comfortable and practical. I tend to wear clothes that I can feel good in but also I can wear when i practice for figure skating. When I purchase my clothing I don’t usually look at where it is made. After reading this weeks KQED, I will most definitely be looking at the tags when I’m at the mall.

      • Jacqueline_2

        I agree with Alis in that I tend to buy clothes with practicality in mind more than trendiness. I also agree with Paige in that it would be easy to switch brands knowing that my clothes are coming from manufacturers with ethical standards in place. With these two mindsets, it actually can be very easy to find clothing that is both practical, affordable, and ethically made just by doing a little research, or like Alis said, even just looking at the tags on your clothing.

        • Allison_2

          I agree with Jacqueline, Alis and Paige. I think if the public was more aware of the conditions being faced in the sweatshops where a majority of our clothes are produced they would reconsider the places they shop. Consumers can in turn feel a stronger need to buy ethically made clothes that are stylish enough but also practical for everyday wear. I feel more people will at least feel obligated to check the tags to see where their clothes are produced after being exposed to just a small amount of this information.

      • Annie_2

        I agree with Alis and Paige. I would more than likely go into a store that had advertisements that are honest and actually said where and how the stores clothing was produced. I personally am not into keeping up with the latest fashion trend, but if I saw that a store I usually shop at is producing its clothing in the cheapest way possible with no concern for safety or wellness, I would switch to a different brand or buy my clothes from a different store. I wouldnt mind paying a little bit more for a shirt that I know had been fairly produced than getting a cheap shirt that could have been produced under poor conditions.

      • Austin

        I agree but sadly companies dont have to deal with the same labor laws like we have in america. This gives them a free pass to underpay and overwork their employees by pumping out clothes faster and cheaper than if they used us to make it for them

      • Taylor_2

        I would have to agree with Alis on this one. Reading this weeks KQED it really gave me a knew perspective and helped open my eyes to pay more attention to the manufactured label on our clothing. I do tend to lean more on the side of practicality rather than what’s “hot” or “in”. Knowing the background knowledge of where my clothes are coming from will help persuade me more in making my purchase. I do believe it could be a smooth transittion from what I am buying now. Keeping in mind practicality and less of the trendy side of fashion and even looking at tags like Alis said earlier helps in the long run.

    • meghan_2

      I agree with you Paige on some aspects, that we, as consumers, are in the dark, we never know if the stores we shop at are treating their workers fairly. I shop for clothing I like and based off of what looks good on me, I don’t really worry about looking for stores that sell american made clothing. I would try to avoid a store if there was a scandal such as the inappropriate manner the American Apparel executives exemplified on their models a few months back, or bad working conditions. However, the public needs to be made aware of these types of scandals to stop shopping at stores these types of stores.

      • Caroline_4

        I agree with Meghan. Consumers aren’t purposely being insensitive when buying cheap clothing. I buy the clothes that I think look best on me and I don’t check to see where it was made. If the public had more knowledge of the conditions people are forced to work in, not as many people would buy these cheap and convenient clothes. Now that I see the environment people must work in to produce a product that is a few dollars cheaper, I will be more conscious of what I buy and where it was made. I would hope that others would do the same if more light is shed on the conditions which these people work in.

        • Kendall_4

          I agree with Caroline. Once people are exposed to the true conditions these workers are forced to live in, I believe many more Americans would make an effort to know where their clothing is coming from. Especially coming from the area we live in, there are many families that could spare to spend a few extra dollars for the sake of helping Bangladesh workers. I feel if even just our school or our surrounding areas was made aware of this issue, significant improvements could be made.

      • Allison_2

        I agree with Meghan because I do feel that a majority of people, including myself, were most likely unaware of the poor treatment of workers that goes on in clothing manufacturing. I agree that most people spend their money on clothes that they feel good in and most consumers tend to not pay any attention to where their garments were produced. I feel if the public can be informed on these issues they will make smarter and more ethical decisions when shopping.

      • emma_2

        I agree with Meghan as well. It’s difficult for consumers to know where exactly the clothing in stores is sourced, and whether or not the workers are treated fairly and safely. While large scandals like this one are publicized, the everyday poor treatment of clothing factory workers doesn’t make the news.
        It’s also very rare to find clothing that hasn’t been manufactured in factories like these. Even higher end and more expensive brands are no longer made in the U.S. Unless companies have some financial initiative to treat their workers more fairly and increase their wages, things probably won’t change.

    • Hanna_2

      I agree with Paige in that I wouldn’t have any trouble switching over to a more ethical brand, considering much of my clothing is either hand-me-downs or from random stores. While I do have the usual Lulu lemon leggings and Nike tennis shoes, I would actually prefer knowing that my clothes came from somewhere where the workers were treated fairly. Knowing which stores to stay away from and which were more ethically responsible would strongly influence my choice in clothing items.

      • Ben_2

        I agree with Hanna because I would prefer spending my money on something that I know was produced by a company or industry with ethical conditions and treatment for their workers. Also, I am not picky about my clothes and I don’t care about keeping up with the latest fashion trends very much, so if I knew which stores/ brands were ethically responsible it would impact where I shop because I don’t have any huge preferences with specific stores in the first place. However, I wouldn’t research which companies have good working conditions before every purchase I make, so the ethics behind different brands and companies would have to be information that I could easily find.

      • jill_4

        I agree with Hanna and also Paige. I do not care what type of clothes I wear or the next big fashion trend. Most of my clothes, as Hannah said, are indeed hand-me- downs. I rather would have and wear a t-shirt that cost less and comes from a safe working environment than any popular brand. Most people wear more expensive clothes just because everyone else influences them. But we all don’t know where those clothes come from or how its made. We are completely unaware. Knowing where clothes are produced and made influences my choice of style.

    • Chris_4

      I do believe your point was valid and agreeable. However, I disagree with you on the point to buy clothing from anywhere that truthfully advertises the factories, and the factory conditions their products were made in. If a store were to say that they make their products in 120 degree weather in the middle of the jungle, I would not go out and buy that clothing because I would now be aware of potential diseases that could have infected that clothing. I would take my chances and buy from a store that does not tell me where, or in what conditions their clothes were made in. And who knows maybe the store I chose could have made their clothes in worse conditions than the one that told me. But at least at the store I chose I wouldn’t be afraid to wear it, because I wouldn’t know what to be afraid of in the clothing.

      • Billy C

        I respect your opinion but I have to say your statement is a pretty accurate representation of how ignorance is bliss.
        If there were two shirts made by different companies, one company labels the conditions in which there shirts were made in and the potential exposure to diseases while the other company doesn’t label anything but their shirts were manufactured in similar conditions.
        Now, I can see how and why you would think how the unlabeled shirt is more desirable if you were a business as people would be more inclined to buy your shirts. But as a consumer you’re saying that you’d rather buy an unlabeled shirt with the same potential for disease because you won’t know.
        I’m just pointing out that you’re choosing the path in which you’d rather not know, the path companies would like you to take, compared to a path in which could improve how these manufacturers function.

  • Paige K

    I think that knowing where and how my clothes are made would definitely dictate what I buy. Unfortunately, this isn’t commonplace — we’re often in the dark as to the processes that make our clothes and it can be difficult to track it down. However, I would definitely consider buying from a store that truthfully advertises their factories and factory conditions. I’m not a very fashionable person in the first place and I could change my look, depending on if the outfit just looks put together in general. It’d be easier for me to switch to a different brand than others.

    • Alis Manoogian_2

      I agree. If stores were willing to advertise where and who makes their clothing, I would be more likely to purchase merchandise from their store. Although it can be difficult to find relatively inexpensive, trendy clothing made in America, I think it is even harder to know for sure who is working in the clothing factories and their conditions. I find my own style as being comfortable and practical. I tend to wear clothes that I can feel good in but also I can wear when i practice for figure skating. When I purchase my clothing I don’t usually look at where it is made. After reading this weeks KQED, I will most definitely be looking at the tags when I’m at the mall.

      • Jacqueline_2

        I agree with Alis in that I tend to buy clothes with practicality in mind more than trendiness. I also agree with Paige in that it would be easy to switch brands knowing that my clothes are coming from manufacturers with ethical standards in place. With these two mindsets, it actually can be very easy to find clothing that is both practical, affordable, and ethically made just by doing a little research, or like Alis said, even just looking at the tags on your clothing.

        • Allison_2

          I agree with Jacqueline, Alis and Paige. I think if the public was more aware of the conditions being faced in the sweatshops where a majority of our clothes are produced they would reconsider the places they shop. Consumers can in turn feel a stronger need to buy ethically made clothes that are stylish enough but also practical for everyday wear. I feel more people will at least feel obligated to check the tags to see where their clothes are produced after being exposed to just a small amount of this information.

      • Annie_2

        I agree with Alis and Paige. I would more than likely go into a store that had advertisements that are honest and actually said where and how the stores clothing was produced. I personally am not into keeping up with the latest fashion trend, but if I saw that a store I usually shop at is producing its clothing in the cheapest way possible with no concern for safety or wellness, I would switch to a different brand or buy my clothes from a different store. I wouldnt mind paying a little bit more for a shirt that I know had been fairly produced than getting a cheap shirt that could have been produced under poor conditions.

      • Austin

        I agree but sadly companies dont have to deal with the same labor laws like we have in america. This gives them a free pass to underpay and overwork their employees by pumping out clothes faster and cheaper than if they used us to make it for them

      • Taylor_2

        I would have to agree with Alis on this one. Reading this weeks KQED it really gave me a knew perspective and helped open my eyes to pay more attention to the manufactured label on our clothing. I do tend to lean more on the side of practicality rather than what’s “hot” or “in”. Knowing the background knowledge of where my clothes are coming from will help persuade me more in making my purchase. I do believe it could be a smooth transittion from what I am buying now. Keeping in mind practicality and less of the trendy side of fashion and even looking at tags like Alis said earlier helps in the long run.

    • meghan_2

      I agree with you Paige on some aspects, that we, as consumers, are in the dark, we never know if the stores we shop at are treating their workers fairly. I shop for clothing I like and based off of what looks good on me, I don’t really worry about looking for stores that sell american made clothing. I would try to avoid a store if there was a scandal such as the inappropriate manner the American Apparel executives exemplified on their models a few months back, or bad working conditions. However, the public needs to be made aware of these types of scandals to stop shopping at stores these types of stores.

      • Caroline_4

        I agree with Meghan. Consumers aren’t purposely being insensitive when buying cheap clothing. I buy the clothes that I think look best on me and I don’t check to see where it was made. If the public had more knowledge of the conditions people are forced to work in, not as many people would buy these cheap and convenient clothes. Now that I see the environment people must work in to produce a product that is a few dollars cheaper, I will be more conscious of what I buy and where it was made. I would hope that others would do the same if more light is shed on the conditions which these people work in.

        • Kendall_4

          I agree with Caroline. Once people are exposed to the true conditions these workers are forced to live in, I believe many more Americans would make an effort to know where their clothing is coming from. Especially coming from the area we live in, there are many families that could spare to spend a few extra dollars for the sake of helping Bangladesh workers. I feel if even just our school or our surrounding areas was made aware of this issue, significant improvements could be made.

      • Allison_2

        I agree with Meghan because I do feel that a majority of people, including myself, were most likely unaware of the poor treatment of workers that goes on in clothing manufacturing. I agree that most people spend their money on clothes that they feel good in and most consumers tend to not pay any attention to where their garments were produced. I feel if the public can be informed on these issues they will make smarter and more ethical decisions when shopping.

      • emma_2

        I agree with Meghan as well. It’s difficult for consumers to know where exactly the clothing in stores is sourced, and whether or not the workers are treated fairly and safely. While large scandals like this one are publicized, the everyday poor treatment of clothing factory workers doesn’t make the news.
        It’s also very rare to find clothing that hasn’t been manufactured in factories like these. Even higher end and more expensive brands are no longer made in the U.S. Unless companies have some financial initiative to treat their workers more fairly and increase their wages, things probably won’t change.

    • Hanna_2

      I agree with Paige in that I wouldn’t have any trouble switching over to a more ethical brand, considering much of my clothing is either hand-me-downs or from random stores. While I do have the usual Lulu lemon leggings and Nike tennis shoes, I would actually prefer knowing that my clothes came from somewhere where the workers were treated fairly. Knowing which stores to stay away from and which were more ethically responsible would strongly influence my choice in clothing items.

      • Ben_2

        I agree with Hanna because I would prefer spending my money on something that I know was produced by a company or industry with ethical conditions and treatment for their workers. Also, I am not picky about my clothes and I don’t care about keeping up with the latest fashion trends very much, so if I knew which stores/ brands were ethically responsible it would impact where I shop because I don’t have any huge preferences with specific stores in the first place. However, I wouldn’t research which companies have good working conditions before every purchase I make, so the ethics behind different brands and companies would have to be information that I could easily find.

      • jill_4

        I agree with Hanna and also Paige. I do not care what type of clothes I wear or the next big fashion trend. Most of my clothes, as Hannah said, are indeed hand-me- downs. I rather would have and wear a t-shirt that cost less and comes from a safe working environment than any popular brand. Most people wear more expensive clothes just because everyone else influences them. But we all don’t know where those clothes come from or how its made. We are completely unaware. Knowing where clothes are produced and made influences my choice of style.

    • Chris_4

      I do believe your point was valid and agreeable. However, I disagree with you on the point to buy clothing from anywhere that truthfully advertises the factories, and the factory conditions their products were made in. If a store were to say that they make their products in 120 degree weather in the middle of the jungle, I would not go out and buy that clothing because I would now be aware of potential diseases that could have infected that clothing. I would take my chances and buy from a store that does not tell me where, or in what conditions their clothes were made in. And who knows maybe the store I chose could have made their clothes in worse conditions than the one that told me. But at least at the store I chose I wouldn’t be afraid to wear it, because I wouldn’t know what to be afraid of in the clothing.

      • Billy C

        I respect your opinion but I have to say your statement is a pretty accurate representation of how ignorance is bliss.
        If there were two shirts made by different companies, one company labels the conditions in which there shirts were made in and the potential exposure to diseases while the other company doesn’t label anything but their shirts were manufactured in similar conditions.
        Now, I can see how and why you would think how the unlabeled shirt is more desirable if you were a business as people would be more inclined to buy your shirts. But as a consumer you’re saying that you’d rather buy an unlabeled shirt with the same potential for disease because you won’t know.
        I’m just pointing out that you’re choosing the path in which you’d rather not know, the path companies would like you to take, compared to a path in which could improve how these manufacturers function.

  • Kameron E.

    No, I would not. Depending on the amount of money I have at the present time. It is more economical for you not to. I would rather invest that money.

  • Kameron E.

    No, I would not. Depending on the amount of money I have at the present time. It is more economical for you not to. I would rather invest that money.

  • Sam Stevens

    I wouldn’t pay more for clothes because it’s the companies job to keep the employees safe and to have good working conditions.

    • Madison_2

      Although I agree with Sam about the companies responsibility to keep the employees safe and have good working conditions, I believe that paying a little more for clothing that meets our standards here wouldn’t hurt. Safe conditions in other countries may not meet the same requirement of our country. If the prices do raise eventually the other countries could receive enough money to raise their working conditions for their employees.

      • Annie_2

        I agree with Madison. Clothing here is very cheap and raising the price by a couple more dollars couldn’t hurt. This extra money could be used to enforce better safety rules or make a factory safer. It could also be used to pay higher wages to those working in these poor conditions. It is the companies responsibility to keep its worker safe and with paying a higher price for clothes, a company can ensure the safety of its workers.

  • Sam Stevens

    I wouldn’t pay more for clothes because it’s the companies job to keep the employees safe and to have good working conditions.

    • Madison_2

      Although I agree with Sam about the companies responsibility to keep the employees safe and have good working conditions, I believe that paying a little more for clothing that meets our standards here wouldn’t hurt. Safe conditions in other countries may not meet the same requirement of our country. If the prices do raise eventually the other countries could receive enough money to raise their working conditions for their employees.

      • Annie_2

        I agree with Madison. Clothing here is very cheap and raising the price by a couple more dollars couldn’t hurt. This extra money could be used to enforce better safety rules or make a factory safer. It could also be used to pay higher wages to those working in these poor conditions. It is the companies responsibility to keep its worker safe and with paying a higher price for clothes, a company can ensure the safety of its workers.

  • April

    I encourage factories to make a change in their inappropriate work environments, but I would not pay more money for the same quality of clothing because it was made at a different factory with better wages. I am a conservative person, and I do not make very money, so it would be better for me to buy the cheaper clothes, although I may not agree with the factory’s business.

    • Nick Vestevich_2

      I agree with april ,that work enviroments are poor, but it’s not going to stop me from buying cheap clotihing. Therefore it’s the factories job to improve the conditions. If the factory workers get higher wages, it will only make it harder for myself to afford clothing.

      • Austin_2

        I disagree with Nick and April because factory conditions need to get better and with the mentality that cheap clothing from unethical factories is better than clothing that costs a bit more from good factory conditions is the reason that nothing has changed. Factory owners need to realize that what they are doing is wrong and they need to spend the extra money to make conditions for the workers better. More people need to think of the factory workers and spend just a little more money on clothing.

        • Michael_4

          I agree with Austin that people do need to make a change. Even if it requires a bit of inconvienence to us buyers in spending a little more money, the benefits far outweigh the costs. Put yourself into the workers shoes and imagine being treated and payed how they are for all the work they do. I think if more people have this mindset, we can make the world better and give people who work hard the treatment they deserve, even if it takes some more money to do so.

    • Paige 4th Hour

      I definitely agree. After thinking it over again, I’ve woefully realized that there are two extremes in the fashion world: crazy expensive clothes and very cheap clothes. If we can’t buy the cheap clothes, we’re at a loss because many of us can’t afford different brands. As much as I would love to help the factory conditions, I thought about my above comment before deciding that the only way I could do both is if these companies change their policies and keep the same low prices. Hopefully, they would do so. If not, I’d probably find myself keeping my clothes even after they’ve been completely worn out. After a while, I’d have to give in to the factory conditions — when my clothes are in tatters, I’m forced to buy new things and I’d enjoy not having to pay extreme prices for clothes I don’t like either.

  • April

    I encourage factories to make a change in their inappropriate work environments, but I would not pay more money for the same quality of clothing because it was made at a different factory with better wages. I am a conservative person, and I do not make very money, so it would be better for me to buy the cheaper clothes, although I may not agree with the factory’s business.

    • Nick Vestevich_2

      I agree with april ,that work enviroments are poor, but it’s not going to stop me from buying cheap clotihing. Therefore it’s the factories job to improve the conditions. If the factory workers get higher wages, it will only make it harder for myself to afford clothing.

      • Austin_2

        I disagree with Nick and April because factory conditions need to get better and with the mentality that cheap clothing from unethical factories is better than clothing that costs a bit more from good factory conditions is the reason that nothing has changed. Factory owners need to realize that what they are doing is wrong and they need to spend the extra money to make conditions for the workers better. More people need to think of the factory workers and spend just a little more money on clothing.

        • Michael_4

          I agree with Austin that people do need to make a change. Even if it requires a bit of inconvienence to us buyers in spending a little more money, the benefits far outweigh the costs. Put yourself into the workers shoes and imagine being treated and payed how they are for all the work they do. I think if more people have this mindset, we can make the world better and give people who work hard the treatment they deserve, even if it takes some more money to do so.

    • Paige 4th Hour

      I definitely agree. After thinking it over again, I’ve woefully realized that there are two extremes in the fashion world: crazy expensive clothes and very cheap clothes. If we can’t buy the cheap clothes, we’re at a loss because many of us can’t afford different brands. As much as I would love to help the factory conditions, I thought about my above comment before deciding that the only way I could do both is if these companies change their policies and keep the same low prices. Hopefully, they would do so. If not, I’d probably find myself keeping my clothes even after they’ve been completely worn out. After a while, I’d have to give in to the factory conditions — when my clothes are in tatters, I’m forced to buy new things and I’d enjoy not having to pay extreme prices for clothes I don’t like either.

  • Lauren

    I would pay more money if the clothes were produced in factories with clean and safe conditions. I would pay more if the clothes were produced here in the U.S. because it would allow our economy to recover. The U.S. needs the money and I would be willing to pay higher costs if it meant that our country would profit.

    • Caroline_4

      I agree with Lauren. Bring this business to the U.S. would not only improve working conditions, but would help our economy. The U.S. is hurt by companies moving their factories to other countries for their cheap labor. I would pay more for clothes if I knew that it was being made in a humane way and helping the national economy. I wouldn’t just be buying a shirt, I would be contributing to more then that.

  • Lauren

    I would pay more money if the clothes were produced in factories with clean and safe conditions. I would pay more if the clothes were produced here in the U.S. because it would allow our economy to recover. The U.S. needs the money and I would be willing to pay higher costs if it meant that our country would profit.

    • Caroline_4

      I agree with Lauren. Bring this business to the U.S. would not only improve working conditions, but would help our economy. The U.S. is hurt by companies moving their factories to other countries for their cheap labor. I would pay more for clothes if I knew that it was being made in a humane way and helping the national economy. I wouldn’t just be buying a shirt, I would be contributing to more then that.

  • Kristi

    I wouldn’t pay more for clothes. Its the companies responsibility to keep the the employees safe and have good condition. And all that money would go to the other countries not ours.

  • Kristi

    I wouldn’t pay more for clothes. Its the companies responsibility to keep the the employees safe and have good condition. And all that money would go to the other countries not ours.

  • Brandi

    My shirt that I currently have upon my body was made in the Dominican Republic. I buy clothes that I like. I do not worry about where they are made or who makes them. If work places are not safe for the employees then the government or someone up top should have to worry about it. I do not know anything about the current workplaces that people work in. If the employees can’t be safe, then that is the companies job to help them out.

    • Ross_2

      I don’t think that the rights of workers can be entrusted to the companies that employ them. Firms think on the margin and typically care little for their employees, so takes a movement of the public in order to create change in these kinds of situations. Hopefully, this tragedy in Bangladesh will have a positive outcome after-all, like how the Triangle Fire in the United States galvanized the early labor movement, and it forces the government to worry about and improve working conditions. The companies are responsible for employing safe working conditions, but as long as there is no punishment for not doing so nor benefit for doing so, nothing will change. The government must be forced into action and enforce new restrictions on companies if there is going to be any hope for change.

    • Miles

      I agree with Brandi. I buy shirts that I like and are comfortable. I should still be allowed to by a nice shirt without having to Google the work conditions of that factory in which it was produced. I don’t constantly think about who is making my shirt. Honestly, what is not buying a shirt that you like, but was made in an intense sweat shop, going to do? Other than you not buying another shirt, and not giving someone 20 bucks nothing happens. Realistically even if 100 people don’t buy a 20 dollar shirt that’s $2,000 not going towards a company, which seems like a lot, but the company is already making so much in profits that 2k isn’t going to affect them.

  • Brandi

    My shirt that I currently have upon my body was made in the Dominican Republic. I buy clothes that I like. I do not worry about where they are made or who makes them. If work places are not safe for the employees then the government or someone up top should have to worry about it. I do not know anything about the current workplaces that people work in. If the employees can’t be safe, then that is the companies job to help them out.

    • Ross_2

      I don’t think that the rights of workers can be entrusted to the companies that employ them. Firms think on the margin and typically care little for their employees, so takes a movement of the public in order to create change in these kinds of situations. Hopefully, this tragedy in Bangladesh will have a positive outcome after-all, like how the Triangle Fire in the United States galvanized the early labor movement, and it forces the government to worry about and improve working conditions. The companies are responsible for employing safe working conditions, but as long as there is no punishment for not doing so nor benefit for doing so, nothing will change. The government must be forced into action and enforce new restrictions on companies if there is going to be any hope for change.

    • Miles

      I agree with Brandi. I buy shirts that I like and are comfortable. I should still be allowed to by a nice shirt without having to Google the work conditions of that factory in which it was produced. I don’t constantly think about who is making my shirt. Honestly, what is not buying a shirt that you like, but was made in an intense sweat shop, going to do? Other than you not buying another shirt, and not giving someone 20 bucks nothing happens. Realistically even if 100 people don’t buy a 20 dollar shirt that’s $2,000 not going towards a company, which seems like a lot, but the company is already making so much in profits that 2k isn’t going to affect them.

  • Julia Lipply

    I am currently wearing a shirt from Cambodia and I feel that I would choose clothing from factories that have fair working conditions and wages if I had all the background information. However, it is difficult to research these factories while shopping.

    • Caroline_2

      I am also currently wearing a shirt from Cambodia! I definitely buy shirts for their practical use, yet if I had the background information I would pay more for clothes knowing the profits benefit others.

  • Julia Lipply

    I am currently wearing a shirt from Cambodia and I feel that I would choose clothing from factories that have fair working conditions and wages if I had all the background information. However, it is difficult to research these factories while shopping.

    • Caroline_2

      I am also currently wearing a shirt from Cambodia! I definitely buy shirts for their practical use, yet if I had the background information I would pay more for clothes knowing the profits benefit others.

  • Amber

    I would not pay more for the clothes I buy. The companies should make sure it is safe for the employees. No one has the money right now to spend more money on clothes. The prices are way to expensive as it is.

  • Amber

    I would not pay more for the clothes I buy. The companies should make sure it is safe for the employees. No one has the money right now to spend more money on clothes. The prices are way to expensive as it is.

  • Cristal

    If I had the money, I would pay more for clothing if i knew that the factories were treating their employees well. But if I didn’t have the extra money, then I would have to go with the cheaper choice. Its very hard because clothes are very expensive as it is. So when you find something you like for a really good price, then you are very tempted to buy it.

    • Emma_4

      I agree with Cristal. If price were not the issue, I tkink that most people would want others to work in a safe environment, but in todays society money is often tight. If a family were struggling financially, they would certainly not pay twenty five dollars for a piece of clothing that they could buy for five dollars. I also feel that most people are unaware of the locations that their clothing comes from, maybe they would be willing to buy more expensive clothing if they were aware of the location they came from.

  • Cristal

    If I had the money, I would pay more for clothing if i knew that the factories were treating their employees well. But if I didn’t have the extra money, then I would have to go with the cheaper choice. Its very hard because clothes are very expensive as it is. So when you find something you like for a really good price, then you are very tempted to buy it.

    • Emma_4

      I agree with Cristal. If price were not the issue, I tkink that most people would want others to work in a safe environment, but in todays society money is often tight. If a family were struggling financially, they would certainly not pay twenty five dollars for a piece of clothing that they could buy for five dollars. I also feel that most people are unaware of the locations that their clothing comes from, maybe they would be willing to buy more expensive clothing if they were aware of the location they came from.

  • Shanda Wang

    I would pay more money if the clothes were produced in factories with clean and safe conditions. I would pay more for the US clothes and it’s good for our America economy. The company should make sure the clothes is safe, it’s the most important.

  • Shanda Wang

    I would pay more money if the clothes were produced in factories with clean and safe conditions. I would pay more for the US clothes and it’s good for our America economy. The company should make sure the clothes is safe, it’s the most important.

  • Shanda Wang

    I would pay more money if the clothes were produced in factories with clean and safe conditions. I would pay more for the US clothes and it’s good for our America economy. The company should make sure the factory is safe, it’s the most important. The people died in the accident is very pitiful, it’s not their fault. Large cracks were visible, but factories continued operating. In my opinion, the boss of the factory had the responsibility of the accident. They should stop operating if there is a potential safety problems. It’s so sad.

  • Shanda Wang

    I would pay more money if the clothes were produced in factories with clean and safe conditions. I would pay more for the US clothes and it’s good for our America economy. The company should make sure the factory is safe, it’s the most important. The people died in the accident is very pitiful, it’s not their fault. Large cracks were visible, but factories continued operating. In my opinion, the boss of the factory had the responsibility of the accident. They should stop operating if there is a potential safety problems. It’s so sad.

  • Brandon Strong

    If everyone knew where there clothes came from, or who made, then (some) people would change where they bought their clothes from, but I dont see a lot of people changing were they buy their clothes from. Me personally it probably wouldn’t effect much different honestly where i buy my clothes from. If more clothes where made in the US, then that’d influence me to see where i bought my clothes from and who manufactured them, and to buy more clothing produced by the US.

  • Brandon Strong

    If everyone knew where there clothes came from, or who made, then (some) people would change where they bought their clothes from, but I dont see a lot of people changing were they buy their clothes from. Me personally it probably wouldn’t effect much different honestly where i buy my clothes from. If more clothes where made in the US, then that’d influence me to see where i bought my clothes from and who manufactured them, and to buy more clothing produced by the US.

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  • Ramon Luna

    I would pay a more for a same shirt if I knew how they were made but since they don’t really provide that information at the store then I wouldn’t really pay more for the same shirt

    • Olivia_4

      I agree and I think a lot of people would also be willing to pay more for clothing if they knew it was made in safe conditions. However, stores don’t really advertise where their clothing is made, so people aren’t given the information they need to make this choice. I feel that if stores were to share where their products are made, many people would switch to US products or products made in safe conditions, which would partially solve the problem.

  • Ramon Luna

    I would pay a more for a same shirt if I knew how they were made but since they don’t really provide that information at the store then I wouldn’t really pay more for the same shirt

    • Olivia_4

      I agree and I think a lot of people would also be willing to pay more for clothing if they knew it was made in safe conditions. However, stores don’t really advertise where their clothing is made, so people aren’t given the information they need to make this choice. I feel that if stores were to share where their products are made, many people would switch to US products or products made in safe conditions, which would partially solve the problem.

  • Julia

    If I knew workers were being payed fairly and the clothing was manufactured in the U.S., I would be willing to pay more for my clothes. I do shop at a lot of so called “fast fashion” stores, and know most of the clothing from these places are manufactured in Vietnam or China. I think the process of making clothes is something that is swept under the rug. All the American consumer looks at is the item- which is now on the shelf. We seem to disregard how it got there or who took the time to make it. The U.S. cannot keep up with countries like China, Bangladesh, or Vietnam and their the ability to produce clothing at a low price and high volume. However, if we started manufacturing clothes in the U.S. we would save the cost of shipping it overseas and also help our rapidly deteriorating environment. There is a lot of good that would come out of manufacturing clothing in the U.S. Most importantly, humans would hopefully be treated with the dignity they deserve.

    • Caroline_2

      I agree in that people are typically ignorant and don’t really think about where their clothes came from. However, if I knew the facts and actually researched, I would pay more.

  • Julia

    If I knew workers were being payed fairly and the clothing was manufactured in the U.S., I would be willing to pay more for my clothes. I do shop at a lot of so called “fast fashion” stores, and know most of the clothing from these places are manufactured in Vietnam or China. I think the process of making clothes is something that is swept under the rug. All the American consumer looks at is the item- which is now on the shelf. We seem to disregard how it got there or who took the time to make it. The U.S. cannot keep up with countries like China, Bangladesh, or Vietnam and their the ability to produce clothing at a low price and high volume. However, if we started manufacturing clothes in the U.S. we would save the cost of shipping it overseas and also help our rapidly deteriorating environment. There is a lot of good that would come out of manufacturing clothing in the U.S. Most importantly, humans would hopefully be treated with the dignity they deserve.

    • Caroline_2

      I agree in that people are typically ignorant and don’t really think about where their clothes came from. However, if I knew the facts and actually researched, I would pay more.

  • Nick M

    I would pay more if I knew my clothing was being made in a safe working environment. The cost difference probably isn’t that much for the individual shopper. The two issues standing in our way is the financial impact such a change would have on major corporations that keep our nation running, and the wool that is pulled over our eyes without our knowing. Major corporations would only be willing to improve working conditions if they were financially able. Now, most of these big businesses would have the money if they were willing to take a small pay cut, but that being virtually impossible, it is our job to search for some other solution to either force strict policies on working conditions or find other solutions to the issue. What also is an issue is the fact most of us have no idea where the products we buy come from, and therefore have no idea we are contributing to an immoral cause. There are already ways one can pay more for clothes that are produced in factories with good working conditions. However, it takes educating ourselves, doing some research to figure out where we can shop smart.

  • Nick M

    I would pay more if I knew my clothing was being made in a safe working environment. The cost difference probably isn’t that much for the individual shopper. The two issues standing in our way is the financial impact such a change would have on major corporations that keep our nation running, and the wool that is pulled over our eyes without our knowing. Major corporations would only be willing to improve working conditions if they were financially able. Now, most of these big businesses would have the money if they were willing to take a small pay cut, but that being virtually impossible, it is our job to search for some other solution to either force strict policies on working conditions or find other solutions to the issue. What also is an issue is the fact most of us have no idea where the products we buy come from, and therefore have no idea we are contributing to an immoral cause. There are already ways one can pay more for clothes that are produced in factories with good working conditions. However, it takes educating ourselves, doing some research to figure out where we can shop smart.

  • Chris

    Since I don’t really care where my cloths are coming from, I’m willing to go ahead and change my way.

  • Chris

    Since I don’t really care where my cloths are coming from, I’m willing to go ahead and change my way.

  • Austin_2

    I am currently wearing a Nautica shirt that was made in China. I agree with “Sara S.” in that if I knew that the shirt that I was buying was made in a factory with good working conditions, I would most likely be willing to pay more for it regardless of where it was coming from. Most everyday shoppers are unaware of the conditions that the clothes they are buying are made under. Plus, shoppers usually like to save their money, which leads to them buying the cheapest shirt that appeals to them. Following “Nick M’s” comment, I believe that stores should give shoppers at least some insight on the conditions in which the clothing was made.

    • Jacob_4

      I agree with this idea. If i knew what the factory conditions were, I would be more willing to buy from compenies who had good conditions. this way, the workers who are protected can be paid more since the company is earning more profit.

  • Austin_2

    I am currently wearing a Nautica shirt that was made in China. I agree with “Sara S.” in that if I knew that the shirt that I was buying was made in a factory with good working conditions, I would most likely be willing to pay more for it regardless of where it was coming from. Most everyday shoppers are unaware of the conditions that the clothes they are buying are made under. Plus, shoppers usually like to save their money, which leads to them buying the cheapest shirt that appeals to them. Following “Nick M’s” comment, I believe that stores should give shoppers at least some insight on the conditions in which the clothing was made.

    • Jacob_4

      I agree with this idea. If i knew what the factory conditions were, I would be more willing to buy from compenies who had good conditions. this way, the workers who are protected can be paid more since the company is earning more profit.

  • Adam_4

    People depend on their jobs to survive. Without the factory and other poorly treated jobs who knows if the workers would be alive. At the same time, it’s a terrible situation to be stuck between a rock and a hard place where your only choices are risky work or death. Buying American goods will help Americans, but at the cost of putting strangers in Bangladesh out of work. As someone with little money for clothes, buying foreign goods seems to be the lesser of the two evils.

  • Adam_4

    People depend on their jobs to survive. Without the factory and other poorly treated jobs who knows if the workers would be alive. At the same time, it’s a terrible situation to be stuck between a rock and a hard place where your only choices are risky work or death. Buying American goods will help Americans, but at the cost of putting strangers in Bangladesh out of work. As someone with little money for clothes, buying foreign goods seems to be the lesser of the two evils.

  • Sam Rob

    I would most definitely pay more for clothes if the factory working conditions were safe. The fact that workers aren’t even safe when they go to work is just sad. We, as a community, need to move toward becoming a safer place and have safer working conditions. Owners of companies need to stop being selfish and provide workers with same worth that they are producing. I would even pay companies to make safer working conditions.

  • Sam Rob

    I would most definitely pay more for clothes if the factory working conditions were safe. The fact that workers aren’t even safe when they go to work is just sad. We, as a community, need to move toward becoming a safer place and have safer working conditions. Owners of companies need to stop being selfish and provide workers with same worth that they are producing. I would even pay companies to make safer working conditions.

  • JM

    Of course I would pay more for clothes manufactured in a safe environment. I don’t think my comfort should come above the health and safety of others. Golden rule.

  • JM

    Of course I would pay more for clothes manufactured in a safe environment. I don’t think my comfort should come above the health and safety of others. Golden rule.

  • Alex M

    I would pay more if I knew that the clothes were made in factories with safe conditions. It’s sad that we have to think about this though, companies should charge a bit more to begin with, and provide safe conditions for their workers. The first step we can take to make work safer for garment workers is to make stable buildings. It’s the least we can do. I do not buy clothes very often so paying a bit more is not a big issue money wise, especially when peoples lives are at hand.

    • Erin_4

      I agree with your claim that we must first change the buildings; that is something we can control and take care of quickly and efficiently before trying to revolutionize the whole market. However, I belive that it would be much more difficult to convince every consumer to pay more for clothing. Anyone who reads this article would understand and their heart would melt for the workers, but it is an entirely different thing to be able to convert their purchasing habbits to pay mor for ethically produced clothing, especially when many people are faced with difficult financial situations back home. I have no other solution to offer, but I do believe it is important to recognize that just because we bleieve something to be the right thing to do does not make it easy to accomplish just by saying you believe in it.

  • Alex M

    I would pay more if I knew that the clothes were made in factories with safe conditions. It’s sad that we have to think about this though, companies should charge a bit more to begin with, and provide safe conditions for their workers. The first step we can take to make work safer for garment workers is to make stable buildings. It’s the least we can do. I do not buy clothes very often so paying a bit more is not a big issue money wise, especially when peoples lives are at hand.

    • Erin_4

      I agree with your claim that we must first change the buildings; that is something we can control and take care of quickly and efficiently before trying to revolutionize the whole market. However, I belive that it would be much more difficult to convince every consumer to pay more for clothing. Anyone who reads this article would understand and their heart would melt for the workers, but it is an entirely different thing to be able to convert their purchasing habbits to pay mor for ethically produced clothing, especially when many people are faced with difficult financial situations back home. I have no other solution to offer, but I do believe it is important to recognize that just because we bleieve something to be the right thing to do does not make it easy to accomplish just by saying you believe in it.

  • Sean Mac

    As a human I sympathize with those who are forced into these horrific working conditions to make the shirts that people across the world wear. Its important that the conditions change, and they will over time. Just as we’ve seen a gradual decrease in forced child labor across the globe, we will eventually see a decrease in they horrific factories. It’s only a matter of time

  • Sean Mac

    As a human I sympathize with those who are forced into these horrific working conditions to make the shirts that people across the world wear. Its important that the conditions change, and they will over time. Just as we’ve seen a gradual decrease in forced child labor across the globe, we will eventually see a decrease in they horrific factories. It’s only a matter of time

  • Kane

    So long as I could afford the clothing, I would definitely pay more for clothing manufactured ethically. To me, ethical clothing seems to be a good idea and one that should be pursued in the future. It benefits those making the clothes and sets a good example for the rest of the world.

    • Ella_2

      I agree with Kane, I am willing to buy clothes for a little bit more money if it was made in fair working conditions rather than spend less money on clothes that I knew were made in unethical conditions. Workers need to be safe in the workplace and we are responsible for it. We should be informed about factories working conditions where we are buying our clothes, and if the conditions are unethical, we should stop buying clothes from there.

  • Kane

    So long as I could afford the clothing, I would definitely pay more for clothing manufactured ethically. To me, ethical clothing seems to be a good idea and one that should be pursued in the future. It benefits those making the clothes and sets a good example for the rest of the world.

    • Ella_2

      I agree with Kane, I am willing to buy clothes for a little bit more money if it was made in fair working conditions rather than spend less money on clothes that I knew were made in unethical conditions. Workers need to be safe in the workplace and we are responsible for it. We should be informed about factories working conditions where we are buying our clothes, and if the conditions are unethical, we should stop buying clothes from there.

  • Alis Manoogian_2

    It is important to know where products are being made and who is in fact making them. When clothing and other products are made out of the United States, it is unknown who is working in the factories and the conditions of the factories. As a customer, I would be most likely to spend more money at a specifc store if this information was shared with the public. Currently I am wearing a pair of Lululemon leggings (location dependent on fabric) and a Gap v-neck (made in Indonesia). As most shoppers do, I look for the best bargin. However, I rarely take into consideration where the clothing is actually coming from. I realize now that it is important to know what I am buying (as a customer) because my purchases can have effects on peoples jobs both within and out of the country.

    • Sarah A

      I agree. I think us as customers should spend more money on clothing we purchase because it could help out those in other countries providing us with these products. In the long run we would be helping out those that need money more than we need a good bargin.

  • Alis Manoogian_2

    It is important to know where products are being made and who is in fact making them. When clothing and other products are made out of the United States, it is unknown who is working in the factories and the conditions of the factories. As a customer, I would be most likely to spend more money at a specifc store if this information was shared with the public. Currently I am wearing a pair of Lululemon leggings (location dependent on fabric) and a Gap v-neck (made in Indonesia). As most shoppers do, I look for the best bargin. However, I rarely take into consideration where the clothing is actually coming from. I realize now that it is important to know what I am buying (as a customer) because my purchases can have effects on peoples jobs both within and out of the country.

    • Sarah A

      I agree. I think us as customers should spend more money on clothing we purchase because it could help out those in other countries providing us with these products. In the long run we would be helping out those that need money more than we need a good bargin.

  • Olivia_4

    I usually don’t think about where clothing is made when I shop. However after reading this article, I will definitely make an effort to buy things made in the US or in safe conditions, even if they are a bit more expensive. It would be great if awareness for this issue prompted more people to make the switch, but it’s just not realistic for some people. In affluent communities, it would be really easy for people to do this because the extra money spent on clothing wouldn’t be a big deal. Unfortunately, in poorer areas not everyone can afford to switch, so there will always be some dependence on cheap clothing made in unsafe conditions.

  • Olivia_4

    I usually don’t think about where clothing is made when I shop. However after reading this article, I will definitely make an effort to buy things made in the US or in safe conditions, even if they are a bit more expensive. It would be great if awareness for this issue prompted more people to make the switch, but it’s just not realistic for some people. In affluent communities, it would be really easy for people to do this because the extra money spent on clothing wouldn’t be a big deal. Unfortunately, in poorer areas not everyone can afford to switch, so there will always be some dependence on cheap clothing made in unsafe conditions.

  • Ross_2

    I would without a doubt buy clothing that is ethically produced if there was that option for me. I am wearing an American Eagle shirt right now that was made in Vietnam. Vietnam, while it is one of the more progressive textile-reliant economies of Asia, still vastly underpays its workers by American standards. However, this isn’t entirely due to AEO taking advantage of foreign poverty. Most of the countries that produce cheap linens – Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia – have weak economies in general and therefore cannot pay their employees by American standards, or their wages would be disproportionate to the rest of the economy. Where ethical production can feasibly begin, therefore, is in the other elements of a factory; working conditions, discrimination, organization of labor, and so on. Where Vietnam is progressive is in these areas, as it already has outlawed discrimination among other shady business practices to protect its workers. Bangladesh, unfortunately, is not as high on the curve as Vietnam, but hopefully this tragedy will catalyze more support for ethical production, which has been a growing trend in recent years and the governments of textile countries will be forced to act.

    • Chris_2

      I hope that this tragedy will serve to change the way we produce clothing in the future as well. Obviously, it is ethically wrong to exploit thousands of impoverished people to make American clothing and give them hardly anything in return. The people who run these large corporations are often times so driven by money, that morals fail to find a place in this business. My sister’s boyfriend of seven years, now 23 years old, recently created a new company that only sells American made clothing. The site is called hankusa.com and although the thought of buying home-made clothing is appealing, the prices are intimidating. It will be hard to change the minds of Americans when money is such a big deal. Especially in our current economic state.

  • Ross_2

    I would without a doubt buy clothing that is ethically produced if there was that option for me. I am wearing an American Eagle shirt right now that was made in Vietnam. Vietnam, while it is one of the more progressive textile-reliant economies of Asia, still vastly underpays its workers by American standards. However, this isn’t entirely due to AEO taking advantage of foreign poverty. Most of the countries that produce cheap linens – Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia – have weak economies in general and therefore cannot pay their employees by American standards, or their wages would be disproportionate to the rest of the economy. Where ethical production can feasibly begin, therefore, is in the other elements of a factory; working conditions, discrimination, organization of labor, and so on. Where Vietnam is progressive is in these areas, as it already has outlawed discrimination among other shady business practices to protect its workers. Bangladesh, unfortunately, is not as high on the curve as Vietnam, but hopefully this tragedy will catalyze more support for ethical production, which has been a growing trend in recent years and the governments of textile countries will be forced to act.

    • Chris_2

      I hope that this tragedy will serve to change the way we produce clothing in the future as well. Obviously, it is ethically wrong to exploit thousands of impoverished people to make American clothing and give them hardly anything in return. The people who run these large corporations are often times so driven by money, that morals fail to find a place in this business. My sister’s boyfriend of seven years, now 23 years old, recently created a new company that only sells American made clothing. The site is called hankusa.com and although the thought of buying home-made clothing is appealing, the prices are intimidating. It will be hard to change the minds of Americans when money is such a big deal. Especially in our current economic state.

  • Matt_2

    Although many people in affluent communities may have no problem with spending more money on clothes that were made in a safe environment, poorer communities would have a hard time with this. Families in downtown Detroit do not have the means to be spending any more money than they already are on clothing. I would love to see all clothing made in safe working conditions but I don’t think it’s possible without limiting the price inflation that would come along with it.

  • Matt_2

    Although many people in affluent communities may have no problem with spending more money on clothes that were made in a safe environment, poorer communities would have a hard time with this. Families in downtown Detroit do not have the means to be spending any more money than they already are on clothing. I would love to see all clothing made in safe working conditions but I don’t think it’s possible without limiting the price inflation that would come along with it.

  • Jacqueline_2

    I am currently wearing Nike shorts made in Malaysia and a tank top from Forever 21 made in Bangladesh. While I am clearly a victim of the cheap-clothing lure (see Forever 21, one of the cheapest and trendiest stores at the mall), I don’t think “ethical shopping” would look much different from normal clothing. Just because a shirt is made by hand and from organic cotton doesn’t mean it looks any different than if it were to be made in a sweatshop. Consumers, including myself, don’t think about where or how the product is made, what is more important is how it looks and how much it costs because those are the factors affecting the consumer. I would be willing to pay more for a piece of clothing if I knew it was made with ethical standards because it probably wouldn’t look much different than a piece of clothing made unethically and it would give me some peace of mind knowing someone wasn’t suffering just so I could wear some brand-name shorts.

  • Jacqueline_2

    I am currently wearing Nike shorts made in Malaysia and a tank top from Forever 21 made in Bangladesh. While I am clearly a victim of the cheap-clothing lure (see Forever 21, one of the cheapest and trendiest stores at the mall), I don’t think “ethical shopping” would look much different from normal clothing. Just because a shirt is made by hand and from organic cotton doesn’t mean it looks any different than if it were to be made in a sweatshop. Consumers, including myself, don’t think about where or how the product is made, what is more important is how it looks and how much it costs because those are the factors affecting the consumer. I would be willing to pay more for a piece of clothing if I knew it was made with ethical standards because it probably wouldn’t look much different than a piece of clothing made unethically and it would give me some peace of mind knowing someone wasn’t suffering just so I could wear some brand-name shorts.

  • meghan_2

    After reading this article I was thinking I was above some of the people they were talking about in this article, not having bought a top from H&M, Forever21, Express, Walmart, Target, or any other cheap store for years until I looked down at my own shorts and realized that what I thought were expensive and nice shorts from Free People were actually made in China. I was no better then someone who bought a top from JC Penney. So, its not just our fault as consumers but the stores fault. The stores need to make a change and create better working conditions for their employees, especially if the company is a striving store.

    • Brooke_4

      I agree with Meghan , consumers need to be more conscious when buying products but companies have responsibilities to fulfill as well. Many Americans do not know where they could get clothing that is made in better working conditions because it is not advertised well. I would be willing to make the change if I new where to go.I am currently wearing a T-shirt that was made in China- it is hard not to purchase items that were made in these countries. The question is not whether consumers would be willing to buy products that were made in better working conditions but, whether companies are able to take ownership and let people know if they do sell these products or fix the conditions if they don’t .Just because a store seems high-end it doesn’t mean that these items were made in good conditions so consumers need to be careful of this.

  • meghan_2

    After reading this article I was thinking I was above some of the people they were talking about in this article, not having bought a top from H&M, Forever21, Express, Walmart, Target, or any other cheap store for years until I looked down at my own shorts and realized that what I thought were expensive and nice shorts from Free People were actually made in China. I was no better then someone who bought a top from JC Penney. So, its not just our fault as consumers but the stores fault. The stores need to make a change and create better working conditions for their employees, especially if the company is a striving store.

    • Brooke_4

      I agree with Meghan , consumers need to be more conscious when buying products but companies have responsibilities to fulfill as well. Many Americans do not know where they could get clothing that is made in better working conditions because it is not advertised well. I would be willing to make the change if I new where to go.I am currently wearing a T-shirt that was made in China- it is hard not to purchase items that were made in these countries. The question is not whether consumers would be willing to buy products that were made in better working conditions but, whether companies are able to take ownership and let people know if they do sell these products or fix the conditions if they don’t .Just because a store seems high-end it doesn’t mean that these items were made in good conditions so consumers need to be careful of this.

  • Hanna_2

    To answer the question, i’m currently wearing a shirt from Jcrew- but i’m not completely sure how their production system works (ethical or not). When it comes to fashion, I know i’d be willing to pay extra for clothing produced by responsible companies. It’s not fair for humans to be treated in so horribly and in such dangerous conditions and receive so little for their work just so we can get cheap products. In a way, buying from ethically responsible companies would be like buying from environmentally conscious companies. While it may be more expensive to get certain products, a few extra dollars isn’t going to kill you, especially when its for better treatment of workers creating the products. I’d definitely be willing to buy clothing from fairer companies.

  • Hanna_2

    To answer the question, i’m currently wearing a shirt from Jcrew- but i’m not completely sure how their production system works (ethical or not). When it comes to fashion, I know i’d be willing to pay extra for clothing produced by responsible companies. It’s not fair for humans to be treated in so horribly and in such dangerous conditions and receive so little for their work just so we can get cheap products. In a way, buying from ethically responsible companies would be like buying from environmentally conscious companies. While it may be more expensive to get certain products, a few extra dollars isn’t going to kill you, especially when its for better treatment of workers creating the products. I’d definitely be willing to buy clothing from fairer companies.

  • Hanna_2

    ***My shirt was made in China

  • Hanna_2

    ***My shirt was made in China

  • Madison_2

    I’m currently wearing a shirt from Forever 21 made in Guatemala and white shorts made in China. Questioning where my clothing is made before I purchase it, is not something that would typically cross my mind. As a consumer, if I see something I like, I buy it without questioning where and whom it was made by. However, I would be willing to purchase more expensive merchandise if I was educated in knowing where it is being made and how the condition were.

  • Madison_2

    I’m currently wearing a shirt from Forever 21 made in Guatemala and white shorts made in China. Questioning where my clothing is made before I purchase it, is not something that would typically cross my mind. As a consumer, if I see something I like, I buy it without questioning where and whom it was made by. However, I would be willing to purchase more expensive merchandise if I was educated in knowing where it is being made and how the condition were.

  • meghan_2

    I found this really interesting article on refinery 29 on the clothing stores kids our age shop at like H and M, Zara, Urban Outfitters, Victorias secret, and forever 21. It shows how ethical all the stores are here is the link
    : http://www.refinery29.com/ethical-fashion/slideshow#slide-1

  • meghan_2

    I found this really interesting article on refinery 29 on the clothing stores kids our age shop at like H and M, Zara, Urban Outfitters, Victorias secret, and forever 21. It shows how ethical all the stores are here is the link
    : http://www.refinery29.com/ethical-fashion/slideshow#slide-1

  • Chris_2

    I am wearing a t shirt from J. Crew and shorts from Nike who both operate their manufacturing business in sweat shop like establishments in China. I think that it is very hard for us to really want to make the switch to buying only American made clothing. Tragedies bring issues like this to the surface only temporarily and make Americans hesitate before buying a shirt made in China. However, soon the low prices will get the better of us once again. The sweat shops’ horrible working conditions, although extremely terrible, will not over ride the need for cheap clothing to many Americans. It is the sad truth. The places where our clothing is made seems so distant and so untouchable that we hardly think twice before buying the lower priced clothing. While this story lingers in the news, people may become more conscious. But as it starts to fade, unfortunately Americans will return to former buying habits.

  • Chris_2

    I am wearing a t shirt from J. Crew and shorts from Nike who both operate their manufacturing business in sweat shop like establishments in China. I think that it is very hard for us to really want to make the switch to buying only American made clothing. Tragedies bring issues like this to the surface only temporarily and make Americans hesitate before buying a shirt made in China. However, soon the low prices will get the better of us once again. The sweat shops’ horrible working conditions, although extremely terrible, will not over ride the need for cheap clothing to many Americans. It is the sad truth. The places where our clothing is made seems so distant and so untouchable that we hardly think twice before buying the lower priced clothing. While this story lingers in the news, people may become more conscious. But as it starts to fade, unfortunately Americans will return to former buying habits.

  • Nick Vestevich_2

    I’m wearing a Hanes undershirt made in Haiti. Where my clothing is made does’t draw my attention, but what draws my attention is the style of clothing and the low prices. Even though conditions in factories may be poor, the best way for bussinesses to grow successful is to have low payed jobs. If people in Haiti were payed a fair amount of money, clothing prices in the United States would be higher, which could cause bussinesses to fail since a smaller group of people would only be able to afford the clothing.

    • Collin_2

      I acknowledge Nick’s statement on how it’s easier for businesses to become successful with low paying jobs and poor working conditions, however, I disagree with his general mentality of how it’s okay for workers to have bad working conditions. In order for change to happen with working conditions in industry, it would take an entire population to not buy from companies with bad working conditions, and instead start buying clothing from factories with good working conditions, therefore it doesn’t help when people have the idea that Nick presents; the idea that it is okay for people to be treated poorly in factories.

  • Nick Vestevich_2

    I’m wearing a Hanes undershirt made in Haiti. Where my clothing is made does’t draw my attention, but what draws my attention is the style of clothing and the low prices. Even though conditions in factories may be poor, the best way for bussinesses to grow successful is to have low payed jobs. If people in Haiti were payed a fair amount of money, clothing prices in the United States would be higher, which could cause bussinesses to fail since a smaller group of people would only be able to afford the clothing.

    • Collin_2

      I acknowledge Nick’s statement on how it’s easier for businesses to become successful with low paying jobs and poor working conditions, however, I disagree with his general mentality of how it’s okay for workers to have bad working conditions. In order for change to happen with working conditions in industry, it would take an entire population to not buy from companies with bad working conditions, and instead start buying clothing from factories with good working conditions, therefore it doesn’t help when people have the idea that Nick presents; the idea that it is okay for people to be treated poorly in factories.

  • Joshua Green

    I think instead of worrying about other countries, we should try to get business to intercourse jobs to America. This way with some good regulations, we could have a strong economy, and have good working conditions.

    • Matt_2

      This is a really good point Joshua. Our economy can always use a little stimulating so why not make it the clothing industry? If all the companies made their clothes in America not only would it provide billions in new income it would also elimanate any doubt about the working conditions under which it was made.

  • Joshua Green

    I think instead of worrying about other countries, we should try to get business to intercourse jobs to America. This way with some good regulations, we could have a strong economy, and have good working conditions.

    • Matt_2

      This is a really good point Joshua. Our economy can always use a little stimulating so why not make it the clothing industry? If all the companies made their clothes in America not only would it provide billions in new income it would also elimanate any doubt about the working conditions under which it was made.

  • Tucker C.

    “Ethical Fashion”? Really? Lol. It won’t solve of the real problems. Ethics won’t happen. That’s business baby. God Bless America. we need it…

  • Tucker C.

    “Ethical Fashion”? Really? Lol. It won’t solve of the real problems. Ethics won’t happen. That’s business baby. God Bless America. we need it…

  • Collin_2

    Im currently wearing a Holloway long sleeve shirt that was made in Vietnam, as well as Pennent sweatpants made in Pakistan. Technically, it doesn’t truly matter whether I buy my clothes from a company that has good working conditions, vs. bad working conditions, because the factory with bad conditions for workers is going to continue doing what they are doing, regardless of my purchase. However, I would buy clothing from a company who has good working conditions for the workers over a company with bad conditions simply because I morally agree with workers being treated correctly, no matter what the job at hand may be.

  • Collin_2

    Im currently wearing a Holloway long sleeve shirt that was made in Vietnam, as well as Pennent sweatpants made in Pakistan. Technically, it doesn’t truly matter whether I buy my clothes from a company that has good working conditions, vs. bad working conditions, because the factory with bad conditions for workers is going to continue doing what they are doing, regardless of my purchase. However, I would buy clothing from a company who has good working conditions for the workers over a company with bad conditions simply because I morally agree with workers being treated correctly, no matter what the job at hand may be.

  • Ella_2

    I’m currently wearing lulu lemon pants made in China and a champion shirt made in Honduras. Where my clothes are from doesn’t matter to me but, if I knew that they were made in unethical conditions, I would gladly pay more money for my clothes. It is not fair for workers to work in unethical conditions and to receive little money for their work just so we can get cheap clothes. Everyone tries to find the cheapest clothes and personally, I never look or care about where my clothes are made from, but if I knew they were made in a factory with unethical conditions, I would pay more for my clothes.

    • Evana_4

      I agree with Ella here. If I was aware about the conditions, I wouldn’t mind paying more to ensure workers had safe conditions. Wanting cheap clothes in our society has become unavoidable. Everyone loves a good deal, but to what extent? Good point Ella!

  • Ella_2

    I’m currently wearing lulu lemon pants made in China and a champion shirt made in Honduras. Where my clothes are from doesn’t matter to me but, if I knew that they were made in unethical conditions, I would gladly pay more money for my clothes. It is not fair for workers to work in unethical conditions and to receive little money for their work just so we can get cheap clothes. Everyone tries to find the cheapest clothes and personally, I never look or care about where my clothes are made from, but if I knew they were made in a factory with unethical conditions, I would pay more for my clothes.

    • Evana_4

      I agree with Ella here. If I was aware about the conditions, I wouldn’t mind paying more to ensure workers had safe conditions. Wanting cheap clothes in our society has become unavoidable. Everyone loves a good deal, but to what extent? Good point Ella!

  • Matti P.

    No matter what, everybody will just go on living and nothing will get changed. Why you ask? Because we are Americans and we are lazy and don’t care about anybody but ourselves’. Thats all that has ever happened and all that will ever happen. America frick yeah! m/

  • Matti P.

    No matter what, everybody will just go on living and nothing will get changed. Why you ask? Because we are Americans and we are lazy and don’t care about anybody but ourselves’. Thats all that has ever happened and all that will ever happen. America frick yeah! m/

  • Reed_2

    I am currently wearing a Ireland rugby jersey that was made in China. Although I believe that the ethics of the working conditions is bad, i find it hard to justify why the workers should be paid as much as an American would make. In an underdeveloped country such as Sri Lanka, paying working large wages would upset the balance of the economy. When the rest of the country is getting paid proportional amounts, the factory workers with menial jobs would be getting paid as much as specialty workers. While extra money should be put forth to working conditions, wages should not be changed drastically.

    • Erica_4

      I don’t think that paying the workers more is the main issue. The employees are working in unsafe working conditions and that has caused many people to die in a way that was completely unavoidable. Continueing to buy these clothes is supporting this unfair treatment, whether people are aware of it or not.

  • Reed_2

    I am currently wearing a Ireland rugby jersey that was made in China. Although I believe that the ethics of the working conditions is bad, i find it hard to justify why the workers should be paid as much as an American would make. In an underdeveloped country such as Sri Lanka, paying working large wages would upset the balance of the economy. When the rest of the country is getting paid proportional amounts, the factory workers with menial jobs would be getting paid as much as specialty workers. While extra money should be put forth to working conditions, wages should not be changed drastically.

    • Erica_4

      I don’t think that paying the workers more is the main issue. The employees are working in unsafe working conditions and that has caused many people to die in a way that was completely unavoidable. Continueing to buy these clothes is supporting this unfair treatment, whether people are aware of it or not.

  • http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2012/10/24/163536890/equal-pay-for-equal-work-not-even-college-helps-women Skylar

    No! Clothes are already enough money, why would we need to pay more?

    • Kenji_2

      Because people all over the world are being exploited in factories with low pay and dangerous working conditions. Did you even read the article?

  • http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2012/10/24/163536890/equal-pay-for-equal-work-not-even-college-helps-women Skylar

    No! Clothes are already enough money, why would we need to pay more?

    • Kenji_2

      Because people all over the world are being exploited in factories with low pay and dangerous working conditions. Did you even read the article?

  • Michael_4

    Personally, I would be willing to spend more on clothing if it means they are coming from a place that treats their workers better and more fairly. Almost all of my clothing is from places out of this country where the factoires treat their workers with disrepect, low wages, and terrible conditions. If I knew there was a place I could go to shop for clothes where the workers were in good conditions, I would shop there as much as I could to promote these types of conditions, regardless of price (as long as it’s not too crazy). Most people just don’t think about the places their clothes are coming from, but I strongly believe that if everyone was aware of these terrible conditions, many people would try harder to buy clothing from places where ethical practices are used in labor.

    • Evana_4

      Good point Michael! I believe if more people were aware of the conditions, they wouldn’t mind spending the extra money, but most people are not aware. I also like how you said more people would search for clothing made with more ethical practices in regards to labor. I completely agree.

  • Michael_4

    Personally, I would be willing to spend more on clothing if it means they are coming from a place that treats their workers better and more fairly. Almost all of my clothing is from places out of this country where the factoires treat their workers with disrepect, low wages, and terrible conditions. If I knew there was a place I could go to shop for clothes where the workers were in good conditions, I would shop there as much as I could to promote these types of conditions, regardless of price (as long as it’s not too crazy). Most people just don’t think about the places their clothes are coming from, but I strongly believe that if everyone was aware of these terrible conditions, many people would try harder to buy clothing from places where ethical practices are used in labor.

    • Evana_4

      Good point Michael! I believe if more people were aware of the conditions, they wouldn’t mind spending the extra money, but most people are not aware. I also like how you said more people would search for clothing made with more ethical practices in regards to labor. I completely agree.

  • Sydney_4

    Right now, I am wearing one of my favorite sweatshirts; a DC zip-up that was made in China. Although I think it is awful, unfair, and unjust for human beings to work in such poor conditions, I don’t think the issue would make me change my wardrobe. I like what I like, and unless the companies that I purchased my clothes from decided to change where/how they produced their clothes, I would continue to “feed the fire” as unethical as that sounds.

  • Sydney_4

    Right now, I am wearing one of my favorite sweatshirts; a DC zip-up that was made in China. Although I think it is awful, unfair, and unjust for human beings to work in such poor conditions, I don’t think the issue would make me change my wardrobe. I like what I like, and unless the companies that I purchased my clothes from decided to change where/how they produced their clothes, I would continue to “feed the fire” as unethical as that sounds.

  • Evana_4

    When looking for clothes, price is a big factor. Your choice in clothing usually depends on your income(or your parents income). Personally, I love a good deal, but I don’t believe workers should be treated poorly. I can understand the low wages, because their economy differs from ours and that’s what balances their system. On the other hand,the treatment of the workers and the condition in which they are expected to make our clothing is not okay. I believe workers should continue receiving their normal wages but should have better treatment.

  • Evana_4

    When looking for clothes, price is a big factor. Your choice in clothing usually depends on your income(or your parents income). Personally, I love a good deal, but I don’t believe workers should be treated poorly. I can understand the low wages, because their economy differs from ours and that’s what balances their system. On the other hand,the treatment of the workers and the condition in which they are expected to make our clothing is not okay. I believe workers should continue receiving their normal wages but should have better treatment.

  • Erin_4

    As noble and humanitarian as I would like to believe myself to be, it is diffucult to truthfully claim that I would rehabilitate my habbits as a consumer in order to support the movement towards more fair working conditions. It is not that I do not beleive in the safety of workers and their right to fair pay and humane conditions, but I must be completely honest in saying that I would find it difficult to adjust my personal budget. My monetary needs are of course unimportant in the shadow of the horrible conditions that foreign manufacturers face, but I am a selfish human being, not by choice, but without constant vigilance I am quite sure I will continue to pay a price that is convinient for me. I would love to say that I would, of course, support the movement towards more ethically produced clothing purchases, and in my heart I feel that is exactly what I would do. But in my head I know that I am lazy and would have to first do some reprioritizing and reorganizing of my financial assets before I could commit to such a lifestyle. I do not say that i would not wholeheartedly join in the movement, but I cannot claim that I would do so well and effectively as I would like to believe I could.

    • David_4

      That is so true. I feel like that is the view of most of the population, whether they know it or not. It’s easy to choose the “right” thing, but most people don’t stop to imagine the effects of their theoretical choice. Not to mention the fact that by buying imported clothes, companies are providing thousands of jobs for people that would otherwise be starving. Granted the pay may not be very good, but money is money. It’s easy to only look at the negative effects of this tragedy, and make a quick, rash decision about how it should be treated without thinking about the impact your decision will a have on your life as well as others.

  • Erin_4

    As noble and humanitarian as I would like to believe myself to be, it is diffucult to truthfully claim that I would rehabilitate my habbits as a consumer in order to support the movement towards more fair working conditions. It is not that I do not beleive in the safety of workers and their right to fair pay and humane conditions, but I must be completely honest in saying that I would find it difficult to adjust my personal budget. My monetary needs are of course unimportant in the shadow of the horrible conditions that foreign manufacturers face, but I am a selfish human being, not by choice, but without constant vigilance I am quite sure I will continue to pay a price that is convinient for me. I would love to say that I would, of course, support the movement towards more ethically produced clothing purchases, and in my heart I feel that is exactly what I would do. But in my head I know that I am lazy and would have to first do some reprioritizing and reorganizing of my financial assets before I could commit to such a lifestyle. I do not say that i would not wholeheartedly join in the movement, but I cannot claim that I would do so well and effectively as I would like to believe I could.

    • David_4

      That is so true. I feel like that is the view of most of the population, whether they know it or not. It’s easy to choose the “right” thing, but most people don’t stop to imagine the effects of their theoretical choice. Not to mention the fact that by buying imported clothes, companies are providing thousands of jobs for people that would otherwise be starving. Granted the pay may not be very good, but money is money. It’s easy to only look at the negative effects of this tragedy, and make a quick, rash decision about how it should be treated without thinking about the impact your decision will a have on your life as well as others.

  • Sydney_4

    As much as I do respect those who say they would pay a lot more money for their clothes to be produced in safe and humane environments, to what level would one be able to commit to this? Certainly you couldn’t research every single company’s factories for every single item you bought, or you would spend all of your time doing so. And not only would this be time consuming, but a psychological burden on whether what you bought was “ethical” or “moral” or not. Unless you memorized all companies that pledge to only have safe factories or disclose this information, it is not very plausible.

  • Sydney_4

    As much as I do respect those who say they would pay a lot more money for their clothes to be produced in safe and humane environments, to what level would one be able to commit to this? Certainly you couldn’t research every single company’s factories for every single item you bought, or you would spend all of your time doing so. And not only would this be time consuming, but a psychological burden on whether what you bought was “ethical” or “moral” or not. Unless you memorized all companies that pledge to only have safe factories or disclose this information, it is not very plausible.

  • Erica_4

    I don’t think many Americans are as upset about the incident in Bangladesh as they should be. If this had happened in America, people would be outraged. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire had less casualties, but people responded to it more. I think this may be because it happened in our country, but I think it’s also because people are changing. Our society focuses a lot on the individual and I think that this has resulted in people having less empathy for others, especailly those in a different country.

  • Erica_4

    I don’t think many Americans are as upset about the incident in Bangladesh as they should be. If this had happened in America, people would be outraged. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire had less casualties, but people responded to it more. I think this may be because it happened in our country, but I think it’s also because people are changing. Our society focuses a lot on the individual and I think that this has resulted in people having less empathy for others, especailly those in a different country.

  • Emma_4

    When going shopping, most people never concider where their clothing comes from, people focus on the style or the price, not really where the piece has come from nor what the factory conditions were. .I think that if more people payed attention to where their clothing was coming from more people would piurchase clothing made in safer facilities. I personally have purchased many shirts from Forever 21, which the materials are cheap and most likely from a factory such as the one in Bangladesh.

  • Emma_4

    When going shopping, most people never concider where their clothing comes from, people focus on the style or the price, not really where the piece has come from nor what the factory conditions were. .I think that if more people payed attention to where their clothing was coming from more people would piurchase clothing made in safer facilities. I personally have purchased many shirts from Forever 21, which the materials are cheap and most likely from a factory such as the one in Bangladesh.

  • Jacob_4

    If I was aware of factory conditions, I would most likely be more willing to purchase products from companies that treated their workers properly. However, compenies do not release this information so I have no way of knowing.

  • Jacob_4

    If I was aware of factory conditions, I would most likely be more willing to purchase products from companies that treated their workers properly. However, compenies do not release this information so I have no way of knowing.

  • Stephen Y._4

    “Ethical Fashion” Is a movement that is being created by the same companies that are the reasons for the movement. Companies like Disney, Nordstrom, And Target all produce clothes in 3rd world countries with low labor costs and have been for years. After recent disasters in Bangladsh, some companys such as Disney have pulled out. though most of the clothes we buy are produced in dangerous working conditions. Does this mean we shouldnt buy anything not made in America? No, it doesnt. Cheap clothes are a luxury that the American public loves and in all reality could’nt live without. When we buy clothes their is no pictures of disasters such as Bangladsh next to the rack of jeans. We blindly buy clothes and we prefer it that way. Because im not sure that even that would stop us from buying cheap clothes>

  • Stephen Y._4

    “Ethical Fashion” Is a movement that is being created by the same companies that are the reasons for the movement. Companies like Disney, Nordstrom, And Target all produce clothes in 3rd world countries with low labor costs and have been for years. After recent disasters in Bangladsh, some companys such as Disney have pulled out. though most of the clothes we buy are produced in dangerous working conditions. Does this mean we shouldnt buy anything not made in America? No, it doesnt. Cheap clothes are a luxury that the American public loves and in all reality could’nt live without. When we buy clothes their is no pictures of disasters such as Bangladsh next to the rack of jeans. We blindly buy clothes and we prefer it that way. Because im not sure that even that would stop us from buying cheap clothes>

  • Adam_4

    To those who say that where something came from should be more advertised, I completely agree. My shirt was made in America, it says so on the sleeve. I wish clothing would be more clear about where it was created. Obviously my clothes are not all American made nor will I switch to only American made clothes, but it’s easier to buy goods made in humane conditions when the opportunity arises if they are well labeled.

    • http://juliawilkins.wordpress.com Julia W_4

      Adam makes a very good point here. I don’t think anyone wishes bad ethical conditions upon workers, but in reality the average consumer is looking for an article of clothing that they find visually appealing and that they can afford. However, the origin of the majority of clothes is hidden in very small print somewhere deep inside the piece of clothing. It takes enough effort to hunt down those few words to stop buyers from looking for it. If stores were to advertise that all of their products were American-made, this would make it very easy for people to feel confident that no one was in danger in the making of their clothes.

  • Adam_4

    To those who say that where something came from should be more advertised, I completely agree. My shirt was made in America, it says so on the sleeve. I wish clothing would be more clear about where it was created. Obviously my clothes are not all American made nor will I switch to only American made clothes, but it’s easier to buy goods made in humane conditions when the opportunity arises if they are well labeled.

    • http://juliawilkins.wordpress.com Julia W_4

      Adam makes a very good point here. I don’t think anyone wishes bad ethical conditions upon workers, but in reality the average consumer is looking for an article of clothing that they find visually appealing and that they can afford. However, the origin of the majority of clothes is hidden in very small print somewhere deep inside the piece of clothing. It takes enough effort to hunt down those few words to stop buyers from looking for it. If stores were to advertise that all of their products were American-made, this would make it very easy for people to feel confident that no one was in danger in the making of their clothes.

  • Adam O

    I think that this needs to be an issue that is talked about in the higher levels of our government. The big businesses need to be held responsible for illegal and harmful activities. Nobody is above the law, especially big business. I try to buy organic clothes, or use hand-me-downs, but it is very hard. Especially if there is a sale or I badly need clothes. I think an investigative report exploring these sweat-shops, that way we can really put these multi billion dollar conglomerates in their places.

  • Adam O

    I think that this needs to be an issue that is talked about in the higher levels of our government. The big businesses need to be held responsible for illegal and harmful activities. Nobody is above the law, especially big business. I try to buy organic clothes, or use hand-me-downs, but it is very hard. Especially if there is a sale or I badly need clothes. I think an investigative report exploring these sweat-shops, that way we can really put these multi billion dollar conglomerates in their places.

  • Chris_4

    I do not believe that factories should have to tell the consumer where they made their products, or in what conditions they were made in. It is clothing nothing will make you terminally sick from it. Yes if it was made in very bad conditions and you get some kind of rash from it, you can always throw the shirt out, and sooner or later the rash will go away. Clothing is not what we need to worry about knowing where it was made, and what conditions it was made it. What we need to worry about for that is the processing of meat, because if that is processed in a dangerous place, and you eat it, it could potentially kill you. But that is another argument.

  • Chris_4

    I do not believe that factories should have to tell the consumer where they made their products, or in what conditions they were made in. It is clothing nothing will make you terminally sick from it. Yes if it was made in very bad conditions and you get some kind of rash from it, you can always throw the shirt out, and sooner or later the rash will go away. Clothing is not what we need to worry about knowing where it was made, and what conditions it was made it. What we need to worry about for that is the processing of meat, because if that is processed in a dangerous place, and you eat it, it could potentially kill you. But that is another argument.

  • Henry_333

    Before this article, I’ve never given thought to where are how my clothes were being produced. I’ve always assumed that the companies would feel self-obligated to give their workers fair and ethical working conditions, and if they were irresponsible then the government would hold them accountable. If I had been aware and been made aware somehow, than I would have made an effort to boycott whatever brand was mistreating their workers. However, even having been made aware of this issue it is difficult and time-consuming to research how various clothing companies treat their workers. The best way to solve this issue is to make the topic public and more prominent. The problem of mistreated workers is very obscure and generic, but if certain companies were exposed it would create public outrage and massive boycotts. It seems to be a much more effective strategy rather than relying on personal knowledge or the responsibilty of the companies.

    • Alex_4

      Henry, your point about exposing the problem is great. The company itself is only out to make money so cheap labor is a positive for them. Ideally, the government should have as little to do with the economy as possible. If people don’t uncover these situations, it won’t get out at all. To make anything happen, it needs to be made into a big deal with a huge amount of people behind the movement. Beyond that, the government and the firm won’t do anything.

  • Henry_333

    Before this article, I’ve never given thought to where are how my clothes were being produced. I’ve always assumed that the companies would feel self-obligated to give their workers fair and ethical working conditions, and if they were irresponsible then the government would hold them accountable. If I had been aware and been made aware somehow, than I would have made an effort to boycott whatever brand was mistreating their workers. However, even having been made aware of this issue it is difficult and time-consuming to research how various clothing companies treat their workers. The best way to solve this issue is to make the topic public and more prominent. The problem of mistreated workers is very obscure and generic, but if certain companies were exposed it would create public outrage and massive boycotts. It seems to be a much more effective strategy rather than relying on personal knowledge or the responsibilty of the companies.

    • Alex_4

      Henry, your point about exposing the problem is great. The company itself is only out to make money so cheap labor is a positive for them. Ideally, the government should have as little to do with the economy as possible. If people don’t uncover these situations, it won’t get out at all. To make anything happen, it needs to be made into a big deal with a huge amount of people behind the movement. Beyond that, the government and the firm won’t do anything.

  • Alex_4

    If I had the option, I would definitely buy clothes that were manufactured ethically. The problem is that “ethically manufactured” is hard to define. What does it even mean? It seems to imply that workers are treated fairly, but again, what is fair treatment? In reality, it varies from country to country. In a country so unionized as Italy, pretty soon workers won’t even have to show up to work to get paid. Anything less would entice riots. However, in China or Bangladesh for example, these workers work ridiculous hours for less money per month than I make at my lifeguarding job in a day, and as far as we see, they don’t complain. It’s a pattern of industrialization that every country goes through. In the English and American industrial revolutions, the story was the same. Long hours and low wages. Now, to us, these conditions seem so terrible when a hundred years ago, the same thing was going on in our country.
    There’s no clear answer to the problem. The only realistic result of a boycott is that these people will loose their jobs, the factories will close, and poverty will rise. You can imagine what you want about bringing the evil company to its knees and making them pledge to be fairer to workers, but we know it won’t happen. The vast majority of people will still buy their clothes and the company will laugh at the boycott, and you will have probably costed someone their job if anything. These countries’ economies are entirely based on exporting to Britain and America. They don’t care about the workers. Cheap labor is a huge problem in the world and until people are willing to pay more for everything, it won’t go away.

  • Alex_4

    If I had the option, I would definitely buy clothes that were manufactured ethically. The problem is that “ethically manufactured” is hard to define. What does it even mean? It seems to imply that workers are treated fairly, but again, what is fair treatment? In reality, it varies from country to country. In a country so unionized as Italy, pretty soon workers won’t even have to show up to work to get paid. Anything less would entice riots. However, in China or Bangladesh for example, these workers work ridiculous hours for less money per month than I make at my lifeguarding job in a day, and as far as we see, they don’t complain. It’s a pattern of industrialization that every country goes through. In the English and American industrial revolutions, the story was the same. Long hours and low wages. Now, to us, these conditions seem so terrible when a hundred years ago, the same thing was going on in our country.
    There’s no clear answer to the problem. The only realistic result of a boycott is that these people will loose their jobs, the factories will close, and poverty will rise. You can imagine what you want about bringing the evil company to its knees and making them pledge to be fairer to workers, but we know it won’t happen. The vast majority of people will still buy their clothes and the company will laugh at the boycott, and you will have probably costed someone their job if anything. These countries’ economies are entirely based on exporting to Britain and America. They don’t care about the workers. Cheap labor is a huge problem in the world and until people are willing to pay more for everything, it won’t go away.

  • http://juliawilkins.wordpress.com Julia W_4

    After reading this article, there is no doubt in my mind that I will think twice before I purchase my next article of clothing. I recently purchased a dress from Urban Outfitters for around $70 and it was listed as “Made in China”. We have become so accustomed to seeing this label printed on the majority of our items (specifically clothing) that we never give it a second thought. We rarely consider where our clothes were made, how they were made, or by whom they were made. Even further than this, I think I can safely assume that maybe 5% of the American population has ever considered the conditions of the workers that are going through hell to create our wardrobe. I fall victim to this stereotype, as I think solely of functionality and attractiveness as I look for clothes to buy. I would be willingly to pay slightly higher prices at stores that advertised themselves as being completely domestic. However, this concept could also become controversial as stores could lie about the background of their clothes, only creating further problems.

  • http://juliawilkins.wordpress.com Julia W_4

    After reading this article, there is no doubt in my mind that I will think twice before I purchase my next article of clothing. I recently purchased a dress from Urban Outfitters for around $70 and it was listed as “Made in China”. We have become so accustomed to seeing this label printed on the majority of our items (specifically clothing) that we never give it a second thought. We rarely consider where our clothes were made, how they were made, or by whom they were made. Even further than this, I think I can safely assume that maybe 5% of the American population has ever considered the conditions of the workers that are going through hell to create our wardrobe. I fall victim to this stereotype, as I think solely of functionality and attractiveness as I look for clothes to buy. I would be willingly to pay slightly higher prices at stores that advertised themselves as being completely domestic. However, this concept could also become controversial as stores could lie about the background of their clothes, only creating further problems.

  • Taylor_2

    Till this very day, I never really thought about where my clothes were being manufactured and processed. I would look on the tags and always be reminded that it was made from China, but I had never really thought about the terrible working conditions these workers were under regardless of were it was made from. To know that these people were obligated to work under such unethical work conditions really saddens my heart. I’m sure if more people were aware that these things were taking place something would have been done. Or would it? Getting the word out to the public and beyond could make an impact so that this doesn’t happen to the next set of workers. Alarming headlines can tarnish a brand. Although, the working conditions of factory workers are known vaguely, they are abreast of the human population. Instead of relying on the companies to make a change, this seems like a smarter move to make in this day in time.

  • Taylor_2

    Till this very day, I never really thought about where my clothes were being manufactured and processed. I would look on the tags and always be reminded that it was made from China, but I had never really thought about the terrible working conditions these workers were under regardless of were it was made from. To know that these people were obligated to work under such unethical work conditions really saddens my heart. I’m sure if more people were aware that these things were taking place something would have been done. Or would it? Getting the word out to the public and beyond could make an impact so that this doesn’t happen to the next set of workers. Alarming headlines can tarnish a brand. Although, the working conditions of factory workers are known vaguely, they are abreast of the human population. Instead of relying on the companies to make a change, this seems like a smarter move to make in this day in time.

  • Michael Richie

    I never really took a good look at this topic before, and it really made me realize of much ethical clothing is important. I think that buying clothes from a place where workers are treated fairly is a big issue along with human rights. Most of the clothes I own are usually from random retailer stores like Nike, J.C.Penny, etc. I think its bad that people are treated this way, and that they should be treated with higher amounts of respect. I hope the people who survived the accident of Bangladesh can be reunited with their families.

  • Michael Richie

    I never really took a good look at this topic before, and it really made me realize of much ethical clothing is important. I think that buying clothes from a place where workers are treated fairly is a big issue along with human rights. Most of the clothes I own are usually from random retailer stores like Nike, J.C.Penny, etc. I think its bad that people are treated this way, and that they should be treated with higher amounts of respect. I hope the people who survived the accident of Bangladesh can be reunited with their families.

  • David_4

    Before a decision is made about the future of clothing production, multiple factors and view points need to be considered. First, there is the producer that would like to continue to make cheap clothes in foreign factories. Most consumers buying the clothes would also prefer that they be made in oversea factories because it keeps the price low. Then, there is the issue of the factory workers. Of course, their safety is a concern, but it shouldn’t be assumed that they’d be better off not being in the factories. The mass production industry provides thousands of jobs for countries that have little alternatives. Overall, I think the best option is to keep things the way they are, as it proves to be the most beneficial to the large majority of people.

  • David_4

    Before a decision is made about the future of clothing production, multiple factors and view points need to be considered. First, there is the producer that would like to continue to make cheap clothes in foreign factories. Most consumers buying the clothes would also prefer that they be made in oversea factories because it keeps the price low. Then, there is the issue of the factory workers. Of course, their safety is a concern, but it shouldn’t be assumed that they’d be better off not being in the factories. The mass production industry provides thousands of jobs for countries that have little alternatives. Overall, I think the best option is to keep things the way they are, as it proves to be the most beneficial to the large majority of people.

  • emma_2

    I’m currently wearing Lululemon leggings (Bangladesh) and a Forever 21 top (Indonesia). I pick out my clothing based on where I get the best deal for the best quality. I’ve stopped checking tags, because it will more than likely be made in countries that don’t have the regulations in place that keep workers safe. Companies are trying to make as much profit as possible, and the consumers don’t often have a reliable source of information regarding the company’s commitment to ethical treatment. Usually, news stories like this one and brands’ own testimonies are the only way consumers are educated on these issues. I’m sure that many people, including myself, wouldn’t mind spending a little extra money if they knew that their clothing was produced by workers who were getting paid and treated fairly.

  • emma_2

    I’m currently wearing Lululemon leggings (Bangladesh) and a Forever 21 top (Indonesia). I pick out my clothing based on where I get the best deal for the best quality. I’ve stopped checking tags, because it will more than likely be made in countries that don’t have the regulations in place that keep workers safe. Companies are trying to make as much profit as possible, and the consumers don’t often have a reliable source of information regarding the company’s commitment to ethical treatment. Usually, news stories like this one and brands’ own testimonies are the only way consumers are educated on these issues. I’m sure that many people, including myself, wouldn’t mind spending a little extra money if they knew that their clothing was produced by workers who were getting paid and treated fairly.

  • Kenji_2

    I believe it is important to know where products are being made and who is making them. The big businesses need to be held responsible for illegal and harmful working conditions. In todays world, it is impossible to track where all clothing comes from, however, I believe we should patronize businesses that truthfully advertise their factories and factory conditions.

  • Kenji_2

    I believe it is important to know where products are being made and who is making them. The big businesses need to be held responsible for illegal and harmful working conditions. In todays world, it is impossible to track where all clothing comes from, however, I believe we should patronize businesses that truthfully advertise their factories and factory conditions.

  • jill_4

    I am currently wearing a white long sleeve Gildan shirt and black Nike shorts made in Malaysia. I do love my cheap clothes and not stepping outside the box over my price range. However, if I was aware of the working conditions of the factory I’m buying clothes from, I would pay extra. I would pay more for clothes that are coming from a safe environment. I believe that everyone should be able to work in a safe place and too not be scared to go to work the next day.

  • jill_4

    I am currently wearing a white long sleeve Gildan shirt and black Nike shorts made in Malaysia. I do love my cheap clothes and not stepping outside the box over my price range. However, if I was aware of the working conditions of the factory I’m buying clothes from, I would pay extra. I would pay more for clothes that are coming from a safe environment. I believe that everyone should be able to work in a safe place and too not be scared to go to work the next day.

  • Ben_2

    I am currently wearing a shirt that was made in the Dominican Republic and shorts that were made in Thailand. I would spend more money on clothes that were made in industries that have healthy and safe working environments to encourage the favorable working conditions. Spending money on clothes that come from ethically responsible industries promote their success, and it would show other industries that they will have to improve working conditions to get more people to purchase their products. Although this would screw over many industries that simply don’t have the resources to change their working conditions, it is the only way consumers could help eliminate poor working conditions. Because obviously buying all of the unethical companies products hasn’t made them feel the need to improve the working environment up till this point.

  • Ben_2

    I am currently wearing a shirt that was made in the Dominican Republic and shorts that were made in Thailand. I would spend more money on clothes that were made in industries that have healthy and safe working environments to encourage the favorable working conditions. Spending money on clothes that come from ethically responsible industries promote their success, and it would show other industries that they will have to improve working conditions to get more people to purchase their products. Although this would screw over many industries that simply don’t have the resources to change their working conditions, it is the only way consumers could help eliminate poor working conditions. Because obviously buying all of the unethical companies products hasn’t made them feel the need to improve the working environment up till this point.

  • Sophia M

    I think that paying a little bit extra for clothing if it is made ethically is a reasonable thing to do but unfortunately it is not as simple as it sounds. I looked up the brand of the shirt I am wearing and couldn’t find where it was manufactured. I’m sure that if I looked harder I might have more luck, but I can’t see a large group of people doing that. Taking the time to research the origin of our clothing is not that difficult but it doesn’t seem realistic for everyone to go looking up brands every time they are about to buy something. It would be ideal, but it isn’t realistic.
    I don’t want to make this inconvenience seem like a wall though. I read a few comments that were simply saying that they didn’t know about the working conditions of the company and that’s why they didn’t bother “shopping ethically”. If the information was made much more accessible and clear by the companies though, this problem would be eliminated and us as Americans would take the time to think about where we shop. I think people do care, they don’t know how to communicate that through their actions. By making this information very open, everyone has the chance to make those educated decisions and show that they care through what they wear.

  • Sophia M

    I think that paying a little bit extra for clothing if it is made ethically is a reasonable thing to do but unfortunately it is not as simple as it sounds. I looked up the brand of the shirt I am wearing and couldn’t find where it was manufactured. I’m sure that if I looked harder I might have more luck, but I can’t see a large group of people doing that. Taking the time to research the origin of our clothing is not that difficult but it doesn’t seem realistic for everyone to go looking up brands every time they are about to buy something. It would be ideal, but it isn’t realistic.
    I don’t want to make this inconvenience seem like a wall though. I read a few comments that were simply saying that they didn’t know about the working conditions of the company and that’s why they didn’t bother “shopping ethically”. If the information was made much more accessible and clear by the companies though, this problem would be eliminated and us as Americans would take the time to think about where we shop. I think people do care, they don’t know how to communicate that through their actions. By making this information very open, everyone has the chance to make those educated decisions and show that they care through what they wear.

  • Billy C

    Ethics vs Economics or Wealth
    It really is about doing things the right way, the ethical way, or doing things in a way that nets more money. In my opinion, it would be best if outsourcing could be stopped in general. Then if companies can endure the heightened costs of working inside the U.S., products would become more ethical and a very popular issue, the lack of jobs in U.S., could also be improved. Companies could look on the bright side, at least they save on shipping costs.

  • Billy C

    Ethics vs Economics or Wealth
    It really is about doing things the right way, the ethical way, or doing things in a way that nets more money. In my opinion, it would be best if outsourcing could be stopped in general. Then if companies can endure the heightened costs of working inside the U.S., products would become more ethical and a very popular issue, the lack of jobs in U.S., could also be improved. Companies could look on the bright side, at least they save on shipping costs.

  • Jacky

    I would buy clothes that made in a safe and clean factory rather than buying fashion clothes because fashion changes all the time and I wouldn’t know how those factories work.

  • Jacky

    I would buy clothes that made in a safe and clean factory rather than buying fashion clothes because fashion changes all the time and I wouldn’t know how those factories work.

  • Ryan KC

    I’ve spent the past three hours rewriting my response to this, I’ve really tried hard to come up with a solution to this. I wrote these huge responses and just ended up contradicting myself every time. So, I’ve come the the conclusion that there isn’t really anything we can do. If we stop buying the products that these companies are selling, they’ll go outta business and the people that work for those companies won’t have a job and life would be even worse for them. In the end, companies will go on abusing certain groups of people for their own personal gain. I think it’s completely wrong, but it’s the world we live in. Ugh, I know that’s a bad ending, but I don’t know what else to say. If you have a good solution, type it in the response section to this comment.

  • Ryan KC

    I’ve spent the past three hours rewriting my response to this, I’ve really tried hard to come up with a solution to this. I wrote these huge responses and just ended up contradicting myself every time. So, I’ve come the the conclusion that there isn’t really anything we can do. If we stop buying the products that these companies are selling, they’ll go outta business and the people that work for those companies won’t have a job and life would be even worse for them. In the end, companies will go on abusing certain groups of people for their own personal gain. I think it’s completely wrong, but it’s the world we live in. Ugh, I know that’s a bad ending, but I don’t know what else to say. If you have a good solution, type it in the response section to this comment.

  • J_Corona

    Okay, not to sound really mean or heartless, but I wouldn’t change my wardrobe for ethical reasons. Honestly, I cheap clothes are my entire wardrobe, and if they are only on the market on account of underpaid laborers or whatnot, well, it is what it is. I am not an human rights activist, I believe it’s simply the luck of the draw. Draw the best card, have the best life. But now I’m rambling. Do not misunderstand me. To the people who slave in factories, underpaid and kept in distasteful work environments, I do have compassion. I’m not ungrateful for their effort. I am just saying I would buy the clothes they produce. I do wish for things to get better for underpaid laborers everywhere, but I’m not about to protest by not buying their clothes, because frankly, who would care?

    Just my own personal thoughts and opinions.

    • Danielle B.

      I appreciate your honesty! I’m sure many people reading this post, though they won’t admit it, are thinking the same thing. Even after reading this I’m positive I’ll still find myself buying conveniently cheap clothing. However, I am going to attempt to purchase clothing from ethical companies to the best of my ability. At the same time, I’d like you to look at this issue from another perspective. Imagine this tragedy occurring here in America. Imagine that someone you love, a friend or family member, was in the building during the time of the incident. Imagine petitioning for minimal labor rights in honor of your loved one, while a person miles away refers to it as “the luck of the draw.” I understand that you are looking at this rationally, and but I can’t help but find your argument sadly dehumanizing. To conclude, you ask, “who would care?” Perhaps the broken families Bangladesh.

  • J_Corona

    Okay, not to sound really mean or heartless, but I wouldn’t change my wardrobe for ethical reasons. Honestly, I cheap clothes are my entire wardrobe, and if they are only on the market on account of underpaid laborers or whatnot, well, it is what it is. I am not an human rights activist, I believe it’s simply the luck of the draw. Draw the best card, have the best life. But now I’m rambling. Do not misunderstand me. To the people who slave in factories, underpaid and kept in distasteful work environments, I do have compassion. I’m not ungrateful for their effort. I am just saying I would buy the clothes they produce. I do wish for things to get better for underpaid laborers everywhere, but I’m not about to protest by not buying their clothes, because frankly, who would care?

    Just my own personal thoughts and opinions.

    • Danielle B.

      I appreciate your honesty! I’m sure many people reading this post, though they won’t admit it, are thinking the same thing. Even after reading this I’m positive I’ll still find myself buying conveniently cheap clothing. However, I am going to attempt to purchase clothing from ethical companies to the best of my ability. At the same time, I’d like you to look at this issue from another perspective. Imagine this tragedy occurring here in America. Imagine that someone you love, a friend or family member, was in the building during the time of the incident. Imagine petitioning for minimal labor rights in honor of your loved one, while a person miles away refers to it as “the luck of the draw.” I understand that you are looking at this rationally, and but I can’t help but find your argument sadly dehumanizing. To conclude, you ask, “who would care?” Perhaps the broken families Bangladesh.

  • Catie

    The last shirt i bought was from wet seal-made in china.

    This vidio makes me really think about where my clothing comes from. I was unaware of the conditions of the workers. I would defently pay more for ethicaly produced clothing because I believe that rights sould be equal, even if the workers are not from America. I hope this incedent brings attention to the world. Factories need to improve there saftey conditions. I know that this will be a stretch for people to look and shop for ethilcly produced clothing. Alot of poeple buy the chepest clothes avalable because they do not have much money or time to check the lable. Ethical shopping looks like a great idea.

  • Catie

    The last shirt i bought was from wet seal-made in china.

    This vidio makes me really think about where my clothing comes from. I was unaware of the conditions of the workers. I would defently pay more for ethicaly produced clothing because I believe that rights sould be equal, even if the workers are not from America. I hope this incedent brings attention to the world. Factories need to improve there saftey conditions. I know that this will be a stretch for people to look and shop for ethilcly produced clothing. Alot of poeple buy the chepest clothes avalable because they do not have much money or time to check the lable. Ethical shopping looks like a great idea.

  • Devin H.

    Yes, I would definitely pay more money for clothes made by factories with fair working conditions and wages. I would much rather support these honest companies rather than support the companies that move their factories overseas and place very low working conditions for their workers. In terms of solving the problem of unethical factories overseas, I think the companies running the factories should be exposed for their actions. This will make efforts to boycott these companies much simpler in hopes of them returning to the standard ethical codes up to expectations.

  • Devin H.

    Yes, I would definitely pay more money for clothes made by factories with fair working conditions and wages. I would much rather support these honest companies rather than support the companies that move their factories overseas and place very low working conditions for their workers. In terms of solving the problem of unethical factories overseas, I think the companies running the factories should be exposed for their actions. This will make efforts to boycott these companies much simpler in hopes of them returning to the standard ethical codes up to expectations.

  • Josh M

    It seems to me that there’s an interesting conundrum here between ethics and efficiency here. As has already been pointed out multiple times, the current setup we have gives us cheap clothing and easy fashion, but is seriously demeaning and dangerous for the people producing it. Though it very well could be markedly more expensive, I personally feel that the human rights of the workers in places like Bangladesh should be considered more. I will admit, I don’t find it likely that large retail stores would be willing or prepared to move directly into a one hundred percent ethical environment for their outsourced jobs, including clean workspace and just pay, but at least maybe some avenue could be found that would allow for the re-evaluation and renovation of the factories in which these workers are stationed. As time goes on, hopefully some way will be found to achieve fully acceptable conditions for workers, but for now I must take an in-between standpoint and say that we aren’t currently ready for that.

  • Josh M

    It seems to me that there’s an interesting conundrum here between ethics and efficiency here. As has already been pointed out multiple times, the current setup we have gives us cheap clothing and easy fashion, but is seriously demeaning and dangerous for the people producing it. Though it very well could be markedly more expensive, I personally feel that the human rights of the workers in places like Bangladesh should be considered more. I will admit, I don’t find it likely that large retail stores would be willing or prepared to move directly into a one hundred percent ethical environment for their outsourced jobs, including clean workspace and just pay, but at least maybe some avenue could be found that would allow for the re-evaluation and renovation of the factories in which these workers are stationed. As time goes on, hopefully some way will be found to achieve fully acceptable conditions for workers, but for now I must take an in-between standpoint and say that we aren’t currently ready for that.

  • Koda C

    If it is for a good cause than yes. I would be willing to change what I wear in order for other people to have a better life. I know that I probably have bought many clothes from places like Bangladesh without even realizing it. Another way we can help is by donating our clothes to places like Goodwill when the clothes we have stop fitting.

  • Koda C

    If it is for a good cause than yes. I would be willing to change what I wear in order for other people to have a better life. I know that I probably have bought many clothes from places like Bangladesh without even realizing it. Another way we can help is by donating our clothes to places like Goodwill when the clothes we have stop fitting.

  • Tino M.

    I have a tendency to buy clothes from companies that are not socially responsible and ethical. I just don’t think about what’s going on behind the scenes when I shop in a store or online. I would though definitely pay more and support clothes made by factories with fair working conditions and wages. It would help if the economy if factories are here and it would also bring the unemployment rate down less. But no one does this except very few because its more expensive and you have to pay at least minimal wage here and you don’t have to in other countries so that’s why there doing this.

  • Tino M.

    I have a tendency to buy clothes from companies that are not socially responsible and ethical. I just don’t think about what’s going on behind the scenes when I shop in a store or online. I would though definitely pay more and support clothes made by factories with fair working conditions and wages. It would help if the economy if factories are here and it would also bring the unemployment rate down less. But no one does this except very few because its more expensive and you have to pay at least minimal wage here and you don’t have to in other countries so that’s why there doing this.

  • Winnie

    As a person growing up in California, I never really paid much interest in where my clothes came from or who was making my clothes, but rather what kind of brands am I wearing. After reading this article, I felt really guilty and pitiful that workers WERE being treated unfairly and all I was, was a spoiled person only thinking about the brands I wear and how I can impress others with the clothes I have. This is a major issue the government should deal with, because like many of the people who commented on this article, I am too, concerned about the workers in these clothing factories. It disgusts me that people have to work in horrible conditions and yet so many people around the world don’t even know about it. I once didn’t know about the situations the workers were in, but now that I know, I believe there should be something we need to do to help the workers and that these businesses need to be held accountable for what they have caused.

  • Winnie

    As a person growing up in California, I never really paid much interest in where my clothes came from or who was making my clothes, but rather what kind of brands am I wearing. After reading this article, I felt really guilty and pitiful that workers WERE being treated unfairly and all I was, was a spoiled person only thinking about the brands I wear and how I can impress others with the clothes I have. This is a major issue the government should deal with, because like many of the people who commented on this article, I am too, concerned about the workers in these clothing factories. It disgusts me that people have to work in horrible conditions and yet so many people around the world don’t even know about it. I once didn’t know about the situations the workers were in, but now that I know, I believe there should be something we need to do to help the workers and that these businesses need to be held accountable for what they have caused.

  • Avery A.

    The shirt I am wearing is from Forever 21, and is made in the U.S.A. which surprised me a bit, knowing that Forever 21 is a very conservative company. I usually don’t shop at stores like Walmart and J.C. Penney because I know that all of their clothing is mass produced and is not very high quality. Currently I try not to put big investments into things because I know that I am still growing, and something will most likely happen to it. But if I knew a product would last me a while, and made in good working environments, then I probably would spend more money on my clothing.
    I wish that the U.S. could help fight poverty in other countries, but maybe in a different way. Instead of have them work in conditions like the building that collapsed in Bangladesh, have them working in healthy, safe environments. I know that this would take a lot more money and effort on our part, but I think that over all, it would be worth it. The problem is, that there will always be that group of people that will never change their way of life to help others, which is another of the many problems the world faces.

  • Avery A.

    The shirt I am wearing is from Forever 21, and is made in the U.S.A. which surprised me a bit, knowing that Forever 21 is a very conservative company. I usually don’t shop at stores like Walmart and J.C. Penney because I know that all of their clothing is mass produced and is not very high quality. Currently I try not to put big investments into things because I know that I am still growing, and something will most likely happen to it. But if I knew a product would last me a while, and made in good working environments, then I probably would spend more money on my clothing.
    I wish that the U.S. could help fight poverty in other countries, but maybe in a different way. Instead of have them work in conditions like the building that collapsed in Bangladesh, have them working in healthy, safe environments. I know that this would take a lot more money and effort on our part, but I think that over all, it would be worth it. The problem is, that there will always be that group of people that will never change their way of life to help others, which is another of the many problems the world faces.

  • spencer_2

    I believe that it is very important to know where our clothes are being produced, who is making them, and what conditions they are made in. Although it would be great if all of our clothing could be produced in america, it is not very probable. However large companies most of which are american, are responsible for the poor working conditions in clothing factories. The solution to this is simple, all companies need to do is invest a little more in their production departmant to ensure the saftey of their employees. So yes I would pay more for certain clothes produced in a safe environment.

  • spencer_2

    I believe that it is very important to know where our clothes are being produced, who is making them, and what conditions they are made in. Although it would be great if all of our clothing could be produced in america, it is not very probable. However large companies most of which are american, are responsible for the poor working conditions in clothing factories. The solution to this is simple, all companies need to do is invest a little more in their production departmant to ensure the saftey of their employees. So yes I would pay more for certain clothes produced in a safe environment.

  • Hank Smith

    I personally feel that i would pay more to help the people of Bangladesh. If i couple more dollars helps with regulations at factories and wages of the workers their i feel i could make the change. The definition of ethical is “Being in accordance with the accepted principles of right and wrong that govern the conduct of a profession.” So ethical shopping would be buying clothes from brands that respect the factories and workers and where their garments come from. Also they would make sure their factories are safe and up to regulations so horrid accidents don’t kill peoples loved ones like this awful tragedy in Bangladesh. I hope the clothing brands who received garments from this factory pay for this horrible happening.

  • Hank Smith

    I personally feel that i would pay more to help the people of Bangladesh. If i couple more dollars helps with regulations at factories and wages of the workers their i feel i could make the change. The definition of ethical is “Being in accordance with the accepted principles of right and wrong that govern the conduct of a profession.” So ethical shopping would be buying clothes from brands that respect the factories and workers and where their garments come from. Also they would make sure their factories are safe and up to regulations so horrid accidents don’t kill peoples loved ones like this awful tragedy in Bangladesh. I hope the clothing brands who received garments from this factory pay for this horrible happening.

  • Danielle_4

    Before this KQED, I hadn’t put much thought into the indirect consequences of the clothing I buy. I have purchased many items from H&M and only one from American Apparel because of the inconvenience in price. After reading this, I will certainly consider what I am supporting through my purchases. A price cannot be put on the equality and fair treatment of others. I think the media has really failed to address this topic. If more people were educated about the consequences of their purchases, I believe there would be a change in the fashion industry.

  • Danielle_4

    Before this KQED, I hadn’t put much thought into the indirect consequences of the clothing I buy. I have purchased many items from H&M and only one from American Apparel because of the inconvenience in price. After reading this, I will certainly consider what I am supporting through my purchases. A price cannot be put on the equality and fair treatment of others. I think the media has really failed to address this topic. If more people were educated about the consequences of their purchases, I believe there would be a change in the fashion industry.

  • Michael P

    I think I would pay more for “ethically-made” garments, rather than the cheap, factory produced clothes. I personally have no objection to having clothes made out of the country, but I do not want to own items that are made by workers in very poor conditions. However, if the U.S. could ultimately stop the outsourcing of jobs, we would have many jobs available in the nation. Because many of these factories are out of the country, we cannot regulate safety or maintenance. Many factory owners have no concern for the poor workers,or the horrible environment. We have to raise even more awareness on where our clothing comes from; not simply by saying “Made in the U.S.”, but informing others of the situations in other countries.

  • Michael P

    I think I would pay more for “ethically-made” garments, rather than the cheap, factory produced clothes. I personally have no objection to having clothes made out of the country, but I do not want to own items that are made by workers in very poor conditions. However, if the U.S. could ultimately stop the outsourcing of jobs, we would have many jobs available in the nation. Because many of these factories are out of the country, we cannot regulate safety or maintenance. Many factory owners have no concern for the poor workers,or the horrible environment. We have to raise even more awareness on where our clothing comes from; not simply by saying “Made in the U.S.”, but informing others of the situations in other countries.

  • Megan

    Before reading this, i had no idea that such things were happening. However even after reading this , I find that it will be hard to know all the companies that are not treating their workers well. Like what many people have said, we have to make the news public, so that people will finally notice this and take action. If companies really do ethica lly manufacture their clothes I would definitely be more willing to buy clothes that are made by factories with fair working conditions that the ones that are not.

  • Megan

    Before reading this, i had no idea that such things were happening. However even after reading this , I find that it will be hard to know all the companies that are not treating their workers well. Like what many people have said, we have to make the news public, so that people will finally notice this and take action. If companies really do ethica lly manufacture their clothes I would definitely be more willing to buy clothes that are made by factories with fair working conditions that the ones that are not.

  • Phillip Y

    I would definitely pay more for ethically-made clothes rather than cheap clothes made in factories with workers that are mistreated. Companies should bring back their companies to the U.S. so more job spots are available allowing the unemployment rate can decrease.

  • Phillip Y

    I would definitely pay more for ethically-made clothes rather than cheap clothes made in factories with workers that are mistreated. Companies should bring back their companies to the U.S. so more job spots are available allowing the unemployment rate can decrease.

  • Daysia Adams

    Being that I am someone who has been raised in California and someone who takes clothing very seriously i do honestly think that i matters. For me , i would pay more for ethically made clothes than cheaper clothes that are made in factories where they are always being mistreated and not given the proper pay for the work that they do. Personally
    I find it sad that most countries and companies that are not here in the U.S. are being treated this unfairly. Here in america not many Americans would put up with not getting the proper pay for there hard work. These companies that are doing this should move their job spots back here to U.S. so that there can be more openings. I didn’t know that these things were actually happening . The sad thing is that most news casts don’t make these things public.

  • Daysia Adams

    Being that I am someone who has been raised in California and someone who takes clothing very seriously i do honestly think that i matters. For me , i would pay more for ethically made clothes than cheaper clothes that are made in factories where they are always being mistreated and not given the proper pay for the work that they do. Personally
    I find it sad that most countries and companies that are not here in the U.S. are being treated this unfairly. Here in america not many Americans would put up with not getting the proper pay for there hard work. These companies that are doing this should move their job spots back here to U.S. so that there can be more openings. I didn’t know that these things were actually happening . The sad thing is that most news casts don’t make these things public.

  • Dimitri S

    I don’t feel like i have to change my clothes for a problem in a different country. Unfortunately in that country there are sweat shops that quickly and cheaply manufacture these clothes that I wear and there’s pretty much nothing I can do about it. If a hundred protesters gather outside a retailer and don’t buy a shirt the company that makes the shirt won’t care for a 2,000 dollar loss. Even if I payed more for my clothes there’s no guarantee that some foreign company will use that to help their workers.

  • Dimitri S

    I don’t feel like i have to change my clothes for a problem in a different country. Unfortunately in that country there are sweat shops that quickly and cheaply manufacture these clothes that I wear and there’s pretty much nothing I can do about it. If a hundred protesters gather outside a retailer and don’t buy a shirt the company that makes the shirt won’t care for a 2,000 dollar loss. Even if I payed more for my clothes there’s no guarantee that some foreign company will use that to help their workers.

  • Bailey Rodrigues

    I personally feel that i would pay more to help the people of Bangladesh. Its not fair that people in those countries are being mistreated when it comes to what they have to do to bring money in their households. Its like human labor, not being awarded for the good that you do , but in these cases its sad because the people in other countries are struggling already and to not give them money for the hard work is sad and extremely messed up . Things like this have to change, nothing like this is really being mad public to the people here in the U.S that probably has to do with the companies here not wanting people to know because they are scared we will stop buying their items.

  • Bailey Rodrigues

    I personally feel that i would pay more to help the people of Bangladesh. Its not fair that people in those countries are being mistreated when it comes to what they have to do to bring money in their households. Its like human labor, not being awarded for the good that you do , but in these cases its sad because the people in other countries are struggling already and to not give them money for the hard work is sad and extremely messed up . Things like this have to change, nothing like this is really being mad public to the people here in the U.S that probably has to do with the companies here not wanting people to know because they are scared we will stop buying their items.

  • Breanna Dean

    It is a very sad thing that the people in those countries are having to deal with not getting paid as much. I know that if that was to happen in america people here would be really mad. I cant imagine how those people there are feeling because those countries have already been poor . I would pay more for that clothing item if it was actually from there because that’s not fair to those people. It isn’t good that people are being treated less than what they are. Its almost like a form of slavery , but getting payed a little bit.

  • Breanna Dean

    It is a very sad thing that the people in those countries are having to deal with not getting paid as much. I know that if that was to happen in america people here would be really mad. I cant imagine how those people there are feeling because those countries have already been poor . I would pay more for that clothing item if it was actually from there because that’s not fair to those people. It isn’t good that people are being treated less than what they are. Its almost like a form of slavery , but getting payed a little bit.

  • BRANDEN C

    i wouldn’t pay more for my cloths because i usually buy clothes that i like, are comfy and even if i wanted to spend more on my clothes instead of buying clothes made in poor and unclean work space i wouldn’t be helping them in any way. because if don’t buy their clothes the people making the clothes would get even less money since less people would be buying them, and then they wouldn’t be able to support their families.

  • BRANDEN C

    i wouldn’t pay more for my cloths because i usually buy clothes that i like, are comfy and even if i wanted to spend more on my clothes instead of buying clothes made in poor and unclean work space i wouldn’t be helping them in any way. because if don’t buy their clothes the people making the clothes would get even less money since less people would be buying them, and then they wouldn’t be able to support their families.

  • Luca S.

    I would pay more money for clothes that were made in places that had safe and clean working conditions and are produced in safe factories where people are getting paid a decent amount of money to make clothes. I wouldn’t care if the factories where in different countries across the world just as long as the people are getting paid more. It’s the clothing company’s job to keep the employees safe and to have good working conditions.

  • Luca S.

    I would pay more money for clothes that were made in places that had safe and clean working conditions and are produced in safe factories where people are getting paid a decent amount of money to make clothes. I wouldn’t care if the factories where in different countries across the world just as long as the people are getting paid more. It’s the clothing company’s job to keep the employees safe and to have good working conditions.

  • Ellie D.

    I would buy clothes made in safe environments no matter what it was. I don’t really care about clothes as long as they’re comfortable. In fact, I’m hoping to someday learn how to sew my own clothes, mostly for cosplay purposes. Although, there’s no law saying I can’t wear cosplay to school, right?

  • Ellie D.

    I would buy clothes made in safe environments no matter what it was. I don’t really care about clothes as long as they’re comfortable. In fact, I’m hoping to someday learn how to sew my own clothes, mostly for cosplay purposes. Although, there’s no law saying I can’t wear cosplay to school, right?

  • Austin Bradfield

    i dont think you should cents per hour like the people in Bangladesh. but i also think that you should have a choice of what you want to wear.if you want to help the people in bangladesh thats great if you want to buy the cool clothing fine. i just think that those people need some help.

  • Austin Bradfield

    i dont think you should cents per hour like the people in Bangladesh. but i also think that you should have a choice of what you want to wear.if you want to help the people in bangladesh thats great if you want to buy the cool clothing fine. i just think that those people need some help.

  • Ellie Teare

    I think ethical shopping is a great idea. I would definitely pay more money for clothes that are made by workers that have a clean safe environment and earn a decent pay. I actually just bought some suspenders and they were a bit pricey but it was worth it because they were handmade locally and I knew that the person who made them was paid for the work that they did. Also I think that buying cheap clothing can be bad because, chances are, the quality won’t be very good, and also the person who made it is probably working with terrible conditions and little pay. I never really thought that much about where my clothes came from, although now I think that the right choice is shopping ethically, even though buying cheaper clothing can sometimes be quicker and easier.

  • Ellie Teare

    I think ethical shopping is a great idea. I would definitely pay more money for clothes that are made by workers that have a clean safe environment and earn a decent pay. I actually just bought some suspenders and they were a bit pricey but it was worth it because they were handmade locally and I knew that the person who made them was paid for the work that they did. Also I think that buying cheap clothing can be bad because, chances are, the quality won’t be very good, and also the person who made it is probably working with terrible conditions and little pay. I never really thought that much about where my clothes came from, although now I think that the right choice is shopping ethically, even though buying cheaper clothing can sometimes be quicker and easier.

  • Eli S

    I would definitely be willing to alter my style for ethics. It wouldn’t be much of a change for me, because I don’t put much effort in to that kind of stuff anyway. However, if I was offered a choice between a cheap t-shirt, or a more expensive one that had a label saying it had been made ethically, I would most definitely pick the ethically made one. I am a humanitarian, so I believe in doing everything I can do to make everyone’s lives I impact better. This doesn’t just mean my friends, or classmates, this means everyone who makes a garment I buy, everyone who works at a company that gives me a service or product, and, with a little stretch, one could say that means I care about everyone in the entire world. Long story short, I would do a lot to make the life of my fellow humans better. I also think that one fundamental reason that these workers are being paid so badly is because of the corporate fat cats using them to make millions. I’d be willing to bet that they could pay their workers 30 to 40 times what they do, and still have a profit. Think about it, every shirt made is sold for what, $4? And how many shirts per hour do they make? It’s got to be more than one. The reason for the underpaid workers, and horrible, dangerous conditions is not cheap clothes, its greedy companies.

  • Eli S

    I would definitely be willing to alter my style for ethics. It wouldn’t be much of a change for me, because I don’t put much effort in to that kind of stuff anyway. However, if I was offered a choice between a cheap t-shirt, or a more expensive one that had a label saying it had been made ethically, I would most definitely pick the ethically made one. I am a humanitarian, so I believe in doing everything I can do to make everyone’s lives I impact better. This doesn’t just mean my friends, or classmates, this means everyone who makes a garment I buy, everyone who works at a company that gives me a service or product, and, with a little stretch, one could say that means I care about everyone in the entire world. Long story short, I would do a lot to make the life of my fellow humans better. I also think that one fundamental reason that these workers are being paid so badly is because of the corporate fat cats using them to make millions. I’d be willing to bet that they could pay their workers 30 to 40 times what they do, and still have a profit. Think about it, every shirt made is sold for what, $4? And how many shirts per hour do they make? It’s got to be more than one. The reason for the underpaid workers, and horrible, dangerous conditions is not cheap clothes, its greedy companies.

  • Camille MacDonald

    I think that it’s really sad and unbelievable that people get paid as little as they do when they work in other countries. It’s messed up, so i’m interested in doing what I can to not support companies that treat their workers badly. I think buying clothes made locally and independently are a good thing to invest in as well, because you’re supporting a smaller business and all the fuel that is used to send clothing from other countries isn’t being burned. I get what the article was saying about clothing being about trend instead of quality these days. Places like forever 21, and H&M make such cheap, “cute” clothes, but that’s a trap!

  • Camille MacDonald

    I think that it’s really sad and unbelievable that people get paid as little as they do when they work in other countries. It’s messed up, so i’m interested in doing what I can to not support companies that treat their workers badly. I think buying clothes made locally and independently are a good thing to invest in as well, because you’re supporting a smaller business and all the fuel that is used to send clothing from other countries isn’t being burned. I get what the article was saying about clothing being about trend instead of quality these days. Places like forever 21, and H&M make such cheap, “cute” clothes, but that’s a trap!

  • Oswin O

    I wish I could say I would totally spend more money on clothes so I could help workers like the ones in Bangladesh. But as I understand, it’s very hard for families with not a lot of spare money to contribute to a cause such as this. People like me, who wear 6 dollar sweaters and her brother’s old socks, may care about these issues a lot, and believe me when I say it, I really wish I could help, but it’s a really hard commitment for people like us. Completely besides the part where people are dying in factories, these cheap clothing are really great for people with not a lot of money. Once in a while I will go out and buy something that’s a little over my price range, but I just feel guilty for sapping my parents’ money for something as trivial as stylish clothing. But like I said before, I really wish I could say I could pitch in and help. Someday when I get my own job I will get a good paying one so I can help people not as fortunate as I am. That’s my goal in life ok YOU JUST SEE

  • Oswin O

    I wish I could say I would totally spend more money on clothes so I could help workers like the ones in Bangladesh. But as I understand, it’s very hard for families with not a lot of spare money to contribute to a cause such as this. People like me, who wear 6 dollar sweaters and her brother’s old socks, may care about these issues a lot, and believe me when I say it, I really wish I could help, but it’s a really hard commitment for people like us. Completely besides the part where people are dying in factories, these cheap clothing are really great for people with not a lot of money. Once in a while I will go out and buy something that’s a little over my price range, but I just feel guilty for sapping my parents’ money for something as trivial as stylish clothing. But like I said before, I really wish I could say I could pitch in and help. Someday when I get my own job I will get a good paying one so I can help people not as fortunate as I am. That’s my goal in life ok YOU JUST SEE

  • Clare R

    Before reading this, I had no idea about the terrible working conditions. It sucks that the people in Bangladesh are payed so little and have to work in such situations. If there were other ways to come to a solution than to bring up the price on clothing, I would fully support it. Unfortunately, I cannot really spend more money on clothing. Even if it is just a few additional dollars on each article, it adds up fast. Since I tend to spend a chunk of my personal money on clothing, I really don’t have the extra to spare. But getting this awareness out is a really good start.

  • Clare R

    Before reading this, I had no idea about the terrible working conditions. It sucks that the people in Bangladesh are payed so little and have to work in such situations. If there were other ways to come to a solution than to bring up the price on clothing, I would fully support it. Unfortunately, I cannot really spend more money on clothing. Even if it is just a few additional dollars on each article, it adds up fast. Since I tend to spend a chunk of my personal money on clothing, I really don’t have the extra to spare. But getting this awareness out is a really good start.

  • Ameena

    I would pay more money for the simple reason of knowing that the workers working in those factories are receiving fair wages and that they have proper working conditions. But it should not be an issue because the companies make so much money that they should already be paying their workers more. Also it will encourage other factory owners to do the same, because they will know that people wont but their products knowing that the workers get VERY low pay and work in a environment that is not safe.

  • Ameena

    I would pay more money for the simple reason of knowing that the workers working in those factories are receiving fair wages and that they have proper working conditions. But it should not be an issue because the companies make so much money that they should already be paying their workers more. Also it will encourage other factory owners to do the same, because they will know that people wont but their products knowing that the workers get VERY low pay and work in a environment that is not safe.

  • J hao

    I would pay more money for clothes if they were manufactured ethically i.e. produced in a factory with fair working conditions and wages. I got a lot of abercrombie clothes and it’s all made in china, it does not really matter to me where the clothes were made.

  • J hao

    I would pay more money for clothes if they were manufactured ethically i.e. produced in a factory with fair working conditions and wages. I got a lot of abercrombie clothes and it’s all made in china, it does not really matter to me where the clothes were made.

  • Jeremiah C

    It’s messed up that the workers don’t get payed fairly, so I would pay more money to help them out so they could get paid fairly. I buy most of my clothes are made from Ecko unltd. and Zoo York there headquarters are located in East Brunswick, New Jersey, and United States.

  • Jeremiah C

    It’s messed up that the workers don’t get payed fairly, so I would pay more money to help them out so they could get paid fairly. I buy most of my clothes are made from Ecko unltd. and Zoo York there headquarters are located in East Brunswick, New Jersey, and United States.

  • Koda C

    Without a doubt I would definitely spend more money if it were to help this situation. Something like this should not be ignored. I know that if I have to, I will change what I wear. Disasters like in Bangladesh should have to never have to happen again.

  • Koda C

    Without a doubt I would definitely spend more money if it were to help this situation. Something like this should not be ignored. I know that if I have to, I will change what I wear. Disasters like in Bangladesh should have to never have to happen again.

  • http://education.kqed eli p

    it is not cool that workers are not geting paid fairly.i think i would pay more for them considering the consiquences there in.most of my clothes are adidas,vans,and other skate brands that are from the usa.

  • http://education.kqed eli p

    it is not cool that workers are not geting paid fairly.i think i would pay more for them considering the consiquences there in.most of my clothes are adidas,vans,and other skate brands that are from the usa.

  • Kendall_4

    I love the idea of simply spending more in order to help resolve the issues, but I wonder if this is a plausible solution. With the economic state that the U.S. is currently in, spending more money for simple things like tshirts can be a difficult sell. Plus, many competitors in other countries would quickly jump at the opportunity that Bangladesh would be leaving open by raising their prices. China would happily lower their prices in order to increase sales to the United States. In all, I love and fully support the idea of making working conditions and pay better for the Bangladeshi workers, but I’m not convinced simply raising their prices is the way to make the change they are looking for.

  • Kendall_4

    I love the idea of simply spending more in order to help resolve the issues, but I wonder if this is a plausible solution. With the economic state that the U.S. is currently in, spending more money for simple things like tshirts can be a difficult sell. Plus, many competitors in other countries would quickly jump at the opportunity that Bangladesh would be leaving open by raising their prices. China would happily lower their prices in order to increase sales to the United States. In all, I love and fully support the idea of making working conditions and pay better for the Bangladeshi workers, but I’m not convinced simply raising their prices is the way to make the change they are looking for.

  • Sarah A

    I am wearing a shirt made in China and shorts made in Cambodia. I never think about where the clothing comes from when I purchase it or the hard labor workers must go through. But now that I am educated as to what happens in those factories I am willing to purchase more expensive clothing to help out the garmet workers to get safer working conditions and higher wages.

  • Sarah A

    I am wearing a shirt made in China and shorts made in Cambodia. I never think about where the clothing comes from when I purchase it or the hard labor workers must go through. But now that I am educated as to what happens in those factories I am willing to purchase more expensive clothing to help out the garmet workers to get safer working conditions and higher wages.

  • Tuyaara

    Stop wasting your time on social network! Lets boykott all this company that cheating people! #DoNowFashion

  • Tuyaara

    Stop wasting your time on social network! Lets boykott all this company that cheating people! #DoNowFashion

  • Stella

    I haven’t stoped to think about how the chothes were made. But knowing that many companies are exploiting women and kids from developing countries, I totally agree with paying more for clothes if they were manufactured ethically and produced in a factory with fair working conditions.

  • Stella

    I haven’t stoped to think about how the chothes were made. But knowing that many companies are exploiting women and kids from developing countries, I totally agree with paying more for clothes if they were manufactured ethically and produced in a factory with fair working conditions.

  • Sofia

    Big stores such as Primark are definitely a big achievement to the global masses because they gave a chance to average people to buy trendy clothes and keep up with fast fashion without overachieving their budget.
    However people need to be careful with these cheap brands, people need to keep up with this ethical movement that is begining. A piece of advice I would give is that I would rather buy a piece of clothe a little more expensive than to buy several really cheap pieces made by a child or someone without the minimum work condition. You have to be careful about where your clothes come from, otherwise you will be incentivating poverty and labor work. It is important that the consumer let their voice be heard, and only then big company’s will change their way if production.

  • Sofia

    Big stores such as Primark are definitely a big achievement to the global masses because they gave a chance to average people to buy trendy clothes and keep up with fast fashion without overachieving their budget.
    However people need to be careful with these cheap brands, people need to keep up with this ethical movement that is begining. A piece of advice I would give is that I would rather buy a piece of clothe a little more expensive than to buy several really cheap pieces made by a child or someone without the minimum work condition. You have to be careful about where your clothes come from, otherwise you will be incentivating poverty and labor work. It is important that the consumer let their voice be heard, and only then big company’s will change their way if production.

  • Joe

    Of course I’d love to pay (a little bit more) for workers who work for sweatshops.

    We should think about these discomfort situations of them and we keep our eyes on these situations.

    All of us, we have responsibility to change these situation.

  • Joe

    Of course I’d love to pay (a little bit more) for workers who work for sweatshops.

    We should think about these discomfort situations of them and we keep our eyes on these situations.

    All of us, we have responsibility to change these situation.

  • Julia (C)

    I don’t focus on where the clothes are made by, but pay more attention on the materials and colours of clothes. Actually, I don’t care about whether labours work in factories fairy or not. Life is unfair always.

  • Julia (C)

    I don’t focus on where the clothes are made by, but pay more attention on the materials and colours of clothes. Actually, I don’t care about whether labours work in factories fairy or not. Life is unfair always.

  • Alex

    I don’t believe that ethics is something that’d stop me from buying ’cause it’s hard to know the origin of all the clothes of any brand. But if I know, for sure is a difference in choosing brands.

  • Guest

    It seems to me that it is similar with being a vagetarian. People tell you it’s cruel to kill animals, but we still eat meat maybe everyday. We know it’s bad to kill a life, but people need it, because it’s hard to change our eating habit. Honestly, I like H&M and those fast fashion brands, but I never thought of that they are come from sweatshops untill now. From now on, I’ll let more people know the truth behind those garmemts.