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Do Now #47: Is Instagram the Best Thing to Ever Happen to Photography?

| October 30, 2012 | 0 Comments
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To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDEdspace and end it with #KQEDDoNow

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.


Do Now

Has Instagram changed the future of photography? Are you an Instagram user? If so, post some of your images on Twitter.


Introduction

40,000,000 instant photographers have exhibited their photography using the social media app, Instagram. Users can post their photos as raw, square-format images, or easily add various filters for a more vintage or saturated look. Instagram photos have been compared to those taken by a version of the Hasselblad and other medium-format film cameras.

Instagram was bought by Facebook in 2012 and has inspired a new wave of photographers who use the app in different ways. Digital photography has gained prominence as an art form, which brings up questions about whether Instagram photos could fall into categories such as fine-art photography or photojournalism.

Resource

PBS Idea Channel segment Is Instagram the Best Thing to Ever Happen to Photography?
With its ability to make boring cellphone photos look “vintage” and “artsy”, Instagram has exploded worldwide. Derided by its detractors as a tool for making bad photos worse, we take an alternate view and argue that Instagram is the greatest thing to ever happen to photography. Its simple filters and social networking features are training cellphone photographers everywhere to think creatively about their photos. Plus, the app is turning its worldwide user base into an army of photojournalists capturing striking images of the people and events around them. As the old photography adage goes, “The best camera is the one you have with you.”


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with@KQEDedspace and end it with #KQEDDoNow

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.

We encourage students to tweet their personal opinions as well as support their ideas with links to interesting/credible articles online (adding a nice research component) or retweet other people’s ideas that they agree/disagree/find amusing. We also value student-produced media linked to their tweets like memes or more extensive blog posts to represent their ideas. Of course, do as you can…and any contribution is most welcomed.


More Resources

Photographers on KQED Spark:

John Chiara – He built his own trailer-size camera.

Trevor Paglen – He photographs restricted military sites.

 

Category: Do Now

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About the Author ()

Kristin Farr is KQED's Arts Education Manager. She is the creator and producer of the Emmy Award-winning video series, Art School, which brings audiences into artists' studios to learn about contemporary art, and engages learners with ideas for new ways to get creative. She is also an artist and a contributing editor for Juxtapoz Magazine.