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Digital Portraits and Cindy Sherman

| August 13, 2012 | 2 Comments
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KQED Arts Education and a group of local educators just completed our second annual “Digital Portraits” course for educators. Last year, we studied California artist Robert Arneson‘s approach portraiture and created short, autobiographical films (Check out last year’s assignment and two of the films in the Edspace archive).

This summer, the artist we looked to for inspiration was none other than Cindy Sherman, who has a retrospective on view at SFMOMA through October 2012. Sherman has been called one of the most important artists of our time and was featured on Art:21. She is known for using herself as a model to create photographic portraits of women who do not represent the artist, but personas and characters she creates.

Watch Transformation on PBS. See more from ART:21.

We also looked at portraits by powerful female artists Louise Bourgeois and Frida Kahlo, and learned about their approaches to portraiture. After this inspiring day led by SFMOMA’s fantastic educators, teachers spent the week writing a  narrative, creating personally relevant images using photography and mixed media, and editing everything together in iMovie to create a digital video portrait. Stay tuned to Edspace to see the films and see what the teachers have to say about their film-making experiences at KQED.

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Category: Arts, Arts in the Community, Community Created Content, Teacher Trainings

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About the Author ()

Kristin Farr is KQED's Arts Education Manager. She is the creator and producer of the Emmy Award-winning video series, Art School, which brings audiences into artists' studios to learn about contemporary art, and engages learners with ideas for new ways to get creative. She is also an artist and a contributing editor for Juxtapoz Magazine.
  • Patrick

    I recently attended the Digital storytelling workshop led by Kristen Farr from KQED,s ed department. For a long time I lacked the introduction necessary for me to tackle this project and yet I did have a vision or two prepared. I decided to approach the workshop with the view of applying this teaching technique in the classroom and I was glad I did as we were introduced to digital storytelling on an Apple computer (you guessed it…I’m a PC pusher!). I adsorbed all I could on the the movie maker program and took the knowledge home to be applied on my trusty PC laptop.

    I already had a collection of my teaching and photography in folders ready to be applied to the movie maker format. I had to tweek a few of the things I learned at Kristen’s workshop, but was so pleased with what my vision was and how it came into being. I t demonstrated a new aspect of my photography and how the flow of each photograph related to each following photo. Take a look! https://vimeo.com/47948392

    With this experience under my belt I decided to make a video telling about my teaching. I had the file already assembled, but learned from my other videos to carefully select the photos with “flow” in mind. I also realized that I could showcase my learned knowledge to prospective principals in my search for a teaching assignment. I crafted my video with love and remembrances for my students and the experiences they faced in my teaching sphere. I think it is a good slice of life of Mr. G’s classrooms and ,again, I used a cut of Vangelis’ music. What do you think?
    https://vimeo.com/47947945 I thoroughly enjoyed the process of digital storytelling and now feel I can easily lead a class in the discovery process of making movie. I’m sure I will learn from my students who are much wiser at computer manipulation than I am. I’m looking forward to learning more.

    Patrick galleguillos

  • Patrick

    I recently attended the Digital storytelling workshop led by Kristen Farr from KQED,s ed department. For a long time I lacked the introduction necessary for me to tackle this project and yet I did have a vision or two prepared. I decided to approach the workshop with the view of applying this teaching technique in the classroom and I was glad I did as we were introduced to digital storytelling on an Apple computer (you guessed it…I’m a PC pusher!). I adsorbed all I could on the the movie maker program and took the knowledge home to be applied on my trusty PC laptop.

    I already had a collection of my teaching and photography in folders ready to be applied to the movie maker format. I had to tweek a few of the things I learned at Kristen’s workshop, but was so pleased with what my vision was and how it came into being. I t demonstrated a new aspect of my photography and how the flow of each photograph related to each following photo. Take a look! https://vimeo.com/47948392

    With this experience under my belt I decided to make a video telling about my teaching. I had the file already assembled, but learned from my other videos to carefully select the photos with “flow” in mind. I also realized that I could showcase my learned knowledge to prospective principals in my search for a teaching assignment. I crafted my video with love and remembrances for my students and the experiences they faced in my teaching sphere. I think it is a good slice of life of Mr. G’s classrooms and ,again, I used a cut of Vangelis’ music. What do you think?
    https://vimeo.com/47947945 I thoroughly enjoyed the process of digital storytelling and now feel I can easily lead a class in the discovery process of making movie. I’m sure I will learn from my students who are much wiser at computer manipulation than I am. I’m looking forward to learning more.

    Patrick galleguillos