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Science Lab — Fall 2011

| November 11, 2011 | 40 Comments
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KQED Education + Cal Academy Seeks SF Educator

KQED and California Academy of Sciences have joined forces again to present a second module of Science Lab! Eighteen dedicated San Francisco educators answered our ad and met at Cal Academy on November 8 to start session one

KQED’s Science Lab is a free series of workshops designed to support K -3 educators integrate media and technology in the classroom to enrich teaching and learning science.

This Science Lab blog is our space to:

  • Share comments and reflect on the way digital media is impacting education
  • Provide highlights of each session and class assignments
  • Recommend free online PBS and KQED educational media resources to enrich science instruction
  • Offer strategies on how to use media in the classroom as an effective teaching tool
  • Offer free and easy-to-use ideas on how to use video and audio podcasting with young learners
  • Read interviews with Cal Academy’s Ed team, SF educators and others!

Shout out to Cal Academy! We are grateful to the museum for hosting six sessions on site and allowing us to use the exhibits as our learning lab. Cal Academy’s education team, Helena and Sarah, know science and more importantly, know how to make it fun in the classroom! That’s why KQED Education is proud to partner with California Academy of Sciences.

Check out this video that provides an overview of Science Lab.

 

Hush! Hear that? Silence in the Steinhart Aquarium
November 8, 2011

When visiting the museum, teachers are accustomed to noise and lots of it, usually the sounds of excited school children darting from exhibit to exhibit screaming about the cool and mysterious animals they see.

But for Science Lab teachers who have access to the Steinhart Aquarium after hours, the museum is quite a different experience. Being surrounded by leafy sea dragons and sharks without the chatter of second-graders makes studying these creatures a peaceful and hypnotic experience.

In session one, teachers were given time to start the science inquiry process by plopping themselves before an exhibit to observe, notice and wonder. Modeling these first few steps and validating student’s interests does wonders to build enthusiasm and curiosity for a topic.

Q1: What was the most interesting observation you’ve made at the Steinhart Aquarium?

 

What’s In Your Digital Toolbox?
November 15, 2011

Do you remember the 8mm film projector, overhead projector, pencil sharpener as the most important pieces of technology in your classroom? Or did you just Google 8mm film projector?

Digital media and technology have shifted the way educators teach and the way students learn. While many classrooms are fortunate to have a working computer and internet access, not every teacher uses it to its full potential. There are certain skills and confidence a teacher must have in order to use digital media and technology effortlessly and productively in the classroom. And in each school there seems to be a ‘digital-divide’ between tech savvy teachers and non-tech savvy ones. However, most educators, tech-savvy or not, are aware that the teaching practice must shift as a whole and mirror how students are learning and accessing information.

Q2: How are you, as a teacher, making changes to your teaching practice with the onset of digital media tools such as video, audio podcasts, blogs, etc? What equipment, knowledge and training is needed for everyone to add to their digital toolbox?

Flip Video Tutorial
November 15, 2011

Below, is a four part video educast series on how to use FlipShare, the video editing program that comes with the Flip Camera. Each section will take you through a particular part of the process. Part 1 is a general overview of the application’s interface along with an explanation of how to download the software from the camera to your computer. Part 2 covers how to save a video from the camera to your computer. Part 3 explains how to make simple trims or edits to a single video. And finally, part 4 overviews how to compile more than one video to create a movie with text and music. To navigate through the four videos, you have to click on the icon on the bottom of the frame that looks like a TV monitor — it is located to the left of the plus sign (+).


Video produced by Matthew Williams

A Passion for Penguins
November 15, 2011

What do penguins do all day? How often have you pondered that question?

The Cal Academy’s Live Penguin Cam is where you’ll find your answer. The 24-hr real-time video footage focuses on the African Penguins located in African Hall at the museum. In session two of Science Lab, Sarah led the teachers through the guided inquiry process to find out what activities these penguins do during a certain time of day. Unfortunately, there wasn’t a whole lot of action when we observed the penguins’ behavior, unless you consider the state of resting mesmerizing.

We used the ethogram or observation data sheet that Sarah created to tally the activities of these penguins in 30-second intervals. Create your own ethogram to collect data on your testable question.

Did you know that an African Penguin:

  • is monogamous and returns with their mate to the same nesting site every year?
  • male and female share the responsibility for incubating the eggs and feeding the chicks?
  • lives 15 -20 years in the wild, often longer in captivity? (The oldest penguin at the Academy,Pierre, is 28.)

Read KQED QUEST’s blog post to learn more about Pierre and why he needed a wetsuit! Also, check out the video on PBS LearningMedia to learn more about penguins. You’ll find another reason to develop a passion for penguins.

Q3: In what way could you use a live web cam, such as Cal Academy’s Penguin Cam, in the classroom to enrich science learning?

A Look at Leafy Sea Dragons at Steinhart Aquarium
November 29, 2011

SF Science Lab FY11 participants LayLay and Sue teamed up to present their final digital media presentation on the leafy sea dragons of Steinhart Aquarium. Check out how they navigated through their learning process using open inquiry and investigated the movement of these beautiful sea creatures.

 

Prediction vs. Hypothesis
by Helena Carmena
November 29, 2011

Through science inquiry, students experience their natural sense of wonder.  The observations they make lead to questions, and these self-generated questions spark the interest to do research! Students learn more about the subject of interest through watching media, reading books, talking to a scientist, or poring over websites.  Some of the questions may not be easy to answer by doing research but they could possibly be testable with appropriate planning.

Deciding on a question to investigate can be challenging.  The study would need to be feasible, meaningful, not too big, and not too small.  The question would be one they could realistically answer themselves through careful experimentation or making observations over time.

In the Investigation and Experimentation standards, students are required to make “predictions” to predict a future event. This is good practice to prepare students to later make a “research hypothesis” in the upper grade levels.

A prediction is only part of a hypothesis.  A hypothesis is a tentative, testable, and falsifiable explanation for an observed phenomenon in nature.  A “research hypothesis” is written with several different components:

If (hypothesis) and (method) ….then (prediction). See the example below:

If…salmon find their home stream by sight (sight hypothesis), and…a group of non-blindfolded salmon and a group of blindfolded salmon from the Issaquah and East Fork streams are released below the fork where the two streams join (planned test), then…the non-blindfolded salmon should be recaptured in their home stream more frequently than the blindfolded salmon (prediction).

Hypothesis writing can be challenging, but is an essential tool for keeping students (and scientists!) focused on exactly what they are doing and why they are doing it.  Due to the complexity of writing hypotheses, we focus on writing predictions in the younger grade levels.  As you can see, it is important to give opportunities to students so they can practice asking meaningful questions and making thoughtful predictions.

Want Free Access to Thousands of Educational Media?
December 5, 2011

PBS launched PBS LearningMedia, a digital media resource web site, to bring the best of public media content together in one place. PreK – 16 educators can access tens of thousands of digital resources designed for and aligned to core standards for classroom instruction. Create an account today at www.pbslearningmedia.org and start searching for digital resources to enrich the classroom learning experience.

Check out this slide show to help you learn more about this valuable teacher resource.

 

 

 

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Category: K-5 Science, Teacher Trainings

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  • http://www.pfungcollects.wordpress.com Patty F.
    • Nancy Y

      Thank you for sharing the great work you’re doing in the outdoor garden program at Alice Fong Yu. How fortunate the students and teachers are to have you leading the way in appreciating science and life! I agree with you that the Flip and other pocket-size hand-held camcorders are a great way for children to document their observations and evidence of science knowledge. How to manage a whole class with limited equipment is indeed a challenge, but not impossible. I will share with you back in SL class a strategy and a few management tips that I’ve used in my teaching days that you might find helpful. It takes a great deal of patience and skill to incorporate collaborative learning in a busy schedule. However, if successful, the students feel ownership in their work and are engaged in their learning – well worth the planning!

  • http://www.pfungcollects.wordpress.com Patty F.
    • Nancy Y

      Thank you for sharing the great work you’re doing in the outdoor garden program at Alice Fong Yu. How fortunate the students and teachers are to have you leading the way in appreciating science and life! I agree with you that the Flip and other pocket-size hand-held camcorders are a great way for children to document their observations and evidence of science knowledge. How to manage a whole class with limited equipment is indeed a challenge, but not impossible. I will share with you back in SL class a strategy and a few management tips that I’ve used in my teaching days that you might find helpful. It takes a great deal of patience and skill to incorporate collaborative learning in a busy schedule. However, if successful, the students feel ownership in their work and are engaged in their learning – well worth the planning!

  • sylvia mrabe

    Although I work with pre-k; I believe being in the science lab has given me a great opportunity to see what the children are capable of achieving. What I am capable of exploring; therefore achieving. It allows the children to explore areas they did not know they were capable of exploring. It allows me to see the children on a diffrent level. It allows the parents to respect their children for their intelligence. Being able to document children’s progress in the room allows me to assess and record their progress much easier; leaving me with more time to educate than tackle paper work. Also, the fact that the flip camera is easy to use it gives my young students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with technology on a safe level where their emotions and self esteem would be boosted to a level of I can do I am able to do; not I don’t know, I am afraid to try. In conclusion; I will be able to provide the same confidence to my students as you provided for me; I think I can; I think I can; I know I can, I know I can. Just to let you and eveyone who is afraid of exploring this area of learning, I am now more confident in exploring teaching with technology than ever. My young students are enjoying their recordings; it has opened a new channel of learning for both my students and I. Thank you so much for the opportunity.

  • sylvia mrabe

    Although I work with pre-k; I believe being in the science lab has given me a great opportunity to see what the children are capable of achieving. What I am capable of exploring; therefore achieving. It allows the children to explore areas they did not know they were capable of exploring. It allows me to see the children on a diffrent level. It allows the parents to respect their children for their intelligence. Being able to document children’s progress in the room allows me to assess and record their progress much easier; leaving me with more time to educate than tackle paper work. Also, the fact that the flip camera is easy to use it gives my young students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with technology on a safe level where their emotions and self esteem would be boosted to a level of I can do I am able to do; not I don’t know, I am afraid to try. In conclusion; I will be able to provide the same confidence to my students as you provided for me; I think I can; I think I can; I know I can, I know I can. Just to let you and eveyone who is afraid of exploring this area of learning, I am now more confident in exploring teaching with technology than ever. My young students are enjoying their recordings; it has opened a new channel of learning for both my students and I. Thank you so much for the opportunity.

  • Alicia A.

    I have been inspired to bring technology into my classroom through this great teacher training opportunity! I’ve been able to get a generous donor to donate three flip video cameras for student use during science observations, and the students love it! This not only advance students in technology, but also develop their oral academic language by having them record their observations and then listening to themselves. Also, as Sylvia mentioned above, it provides teachers with a quick assessment of their progress. It’s been great seeing students faces light up with excitement every time we getting ready for science. Thanks for this opportunity!

  • Alicia A.

    I have been inspired to bring technology into my classroom through this great teacher training opportunity! I’ve been able to get a generous donor to donate three flip video cameras for student use during science observations, and the students love it! This not only advance students in technology, but also develop their oral academic language by having them record their observations and then listening to themselves. Also, as Sylvia mentioned above, it provides teachers with a quick assessment of their progress. It’s been great seeing students faces light up with excitement every time we getting ready for science. Thanks for this opportunity!

  • Maria Herrera

    I have been trying to incorporate more technology into my classroom but it has been very difficult to because of unreliable computers. However, today during computer class I asked the computer teacher to allow me 15 minutes to preview some of the exhibits we will be exploring on our field trip to the Academy this coming Wednesday. Students were really excited and to my surprise, I had them quietly observe for 10 seconds and share what they observed in the 10 seconds. We did this three times with the biologist cam, underwater cam, and regular cam. We were also able to check out the other exhibits-rainforest, Steinhart aquarium and project lab. Students were really interested in the project lab and asked many I wonder and I notice questions. I was delighted to see how engaged and curious they were with just watching these few clips. The short 15 minute preview proved how engaging and powerful technology can be in supporting curriculum. It also showed that it does not have to be a very long clip but rather have a purpose and ask the right questions.

  • Maria Herrera

    I have been trying to incorporate more technology into my classroom but it has been very difficult to because of unreliable computers. However, today during computer class I asked the computer teacher to allow me 15 minutes to preview some of the exhibits we will be exploring on our field trip to the Academy this coming Wednesday. Students were really excited and to my surprise, I had them quietly observe for 10 seconds and share what they observed in the 10 seconds. We did this three times with the biologist cam, underwater cam, and regular cam. We were also able to check out the other exhibits-rainforest, Steinhart aquarium and project lab. Students were really interested in the project lab and asked many I wonder and I notice questions. I was delighted to see how engaged and curious they were with just watching these few clips. The short 15 minute preview proved how engaging and powerful technology can be in supporting curriculum. It also showed that it does not have to be a very long clip but rather have a purpose and ask the right questions.

  • Anna Fulton

    Integrating technology in the classroom continues to excite and inspire the love of teaching. I enjoy reporting back to the 3rd grade classroom my discoveries in my Science Lab training. Empowering young minds with tools to media to support a whole education is not the wave of the future…it is happening now! Because of this young minds can grasp concepts easier through different learning modalities…and show us what they have learned in infinite possibilities. Can’t wait to keep learning more….like the audacity training we have coming up. Thanks for the education!

  • Anna Fulton

    Integrating technology in the classroom continues to excite and inspire the love of teaching. I enjoy reporting back to the 3rd grade classroom my discoveries in my Science Lab training. Empowering young minds with tools to media to support a whole education is not the wave of the future…it is happening now! Because of this young minds can grasp concepts easier through different learning modalities…and show us what they have learned in infinite possibilities. Can’t wait to keep learning more….like the audacity training we have coming up. Thanks for the education!

  • Leslie Zwemer

    I was able to both show my short video of the penguins and the jelly fish I was able to video during my sessions to my kindergarten students. They were fascinated with the jelly fish and their movement through the water. They asked many “I wonder” and I and “I notice” questions after I modeled them a few times. I found this very valuable and have learned over the course of the class to allow my students to wonder and observe about ….JEFF is bugging me so I wonder if he wants a turn???

  • Leslie Zwemer

    I was able to both show my short video of the penguins and the jelly fish I was able to video during my sessions to my kindergarten students. They were fascinated with the jelly fish and their movement through the water. They asked many “I wonder” and I and “I notice” questions after I modeled them a few times. I found this very valuable and have learned over the course of the class to allow my students to wonder and observe about ….JEFF is bugging me so I wonder if he wants a turn???

  • Jeff Dearborn

    Helena Young is an academy of sciences gem as are so many of the staff. Her dedication and vivaciousness gives is one of the many reasons I so enjoy getting training at the Academy of Sciences. I hope to continue to come to the Academy for years to receive this vital and fascinating training to upgrade my skills as a teacher and as a well rounded human being.

    • Anna Fulton

      Right Jeff! I totally agree!

    • Jessica Garcia

      Helena Young is so patient too! You can totally feel the passion of Helena when we she teaches also. It is not easy to teach teachers either. As Jeff, I hope to continue to attend workshops at the Academy of Sciences to receive amazing skills that teachers need in order to keep up with all the new science discoveries that take place day to day. The Academy of Sciences is an awesome place to learn about science and I hope to be a part of the program myself someday as many wonderful teachers have become a part of the program.

  • Jeff Dearborn

    Helena Young is an academy of sciences gem as are so many of the staff. Her dedication and vivaciousness gives is one of the many reasons I so enjoy getting training at the Academy of Sciences. I hope to continue to come to the Academy for years to receive this vital and fascinating training to upgrade my skills as a teacher and as a well rounded human being.

    • Anna Fulton

      Right Jeff! I totally agree!

    • Jessica Garcia

      Helena Young is so patient too! You can totally feel the passion of Helena when we she teaches also. It is not easy to teach teachers either. As Jeff, I hope to continue to attend workshops at the Academy of Sciences to receive amazing skills that teachers need in order to keep up with all the new science discoveries that take place day to day. The Academy of Sciences is an awesome place to learn about science and I hope to be a part of the program myself someday as many wonderful teachers have become a part of the program.

  • http://mindshift.kqed.org/ Leslie Zwemer

    I went on Mindshift and explored the site. I found many lessons, media video, worksheets etc. I never knew existed. The one I am currently interested in using with my class is the series on The Cat in The Hat Science series for science inquiry with Kindergarten students. There is a plethora of information on this site and I will be using it to plan and share videos for introductions to science study.

  • http://mindshift.kqed.org/ Leslie Zwemer

    I went on Mindshift and explored the site. I found many lessons, media video, worksheets etc. I never knew existed. The one I am currently interested in using with my class is the series on The Cat in The Hat Science series for science inquiry with Kindergarten students. There is a plethora of information on this site and I will be using it to plan and share videos for introductions to science study.

  • Evelyn Mar

    Response to Q1 Exploring Steinhart Aquarium after hours as a marvelous experience. It is fun being a learner. As a learner, my senses were sharper. Implementing the science inquiry process: I observe, I notice, and I wonder are great techniques to help the learner to be focused.

    Response to Q2 During my Science lesson, I used the Flip camera to record my students exploring with dead fish. Students were fascinated to see the recording of the science lesson. Also, Each student was given the opportunity to record a interesting object in the classroom.

    ;

  • Evelyn Mar

    Response to Q1 Exploring Steinhart Aquarium after hours as a marvelous experience. It is fun being a learner. As a learner, my senses were sharper. Implementing the science inquiry process: I observe, I notice, and I wonder are great techniques to help the learner to be focused.

    Response to Q2 During my Science lesson, I used the Flip camera to record my students exploring with dead fish. Students were fascinated to see the recording of the science lesson. Also, Each student was given the opportunity to record a interesting object in the classroom.

    ;

  • http://Mindshift Peter Ciddio

    The Mindshift website is awesome. I read the article about Public Library. It is a fantastic vision to revamp the public libraries with technology influencing the changes in the 21st Century. Furthermore, I have enjoyed exploring the website.

    Responding to Q2. I have enjoyed exploring the Flip camera in the classroom. The students were excited when I was recording what their day was like in our learning environment.
    I hope to continue using the skills that I learned in this KQED?Science Lab class.

  • http://Mindshift Peter Ciddio

    The Mindshift website is awesome. I read the article about Public Library. It is a fantastic vision to revamp the public libraries with technology influencing the changes in the 21st Century. Furthermore, I have enjoyed exploring the website.

    Responding to Q2. I have enjoyed exploring the Flip camera in the classroom. The students were excited when I was recording what their day was like in our learning environment.
    I hope to continue using the skills that I learned in this KQED?Science Lab class.

  • Karen

    This program has been a great learning experience. I’m so glad I can now create a movie with the Flip camera. A big thank you to Nancy, Sarah and Helena for providing this opportunity. I will definitely use the many websites and skills teaching science to the elementary school students.

    Question 1: The most interesting observation I’ve made during my visits to the aquarium is how nice it is to not have my own children or students with me when visiting the aquarium. I’ve been to the aquarium several times and have been a member, but I am always there with a class or two or my children. It is a nice break to be able to look around and discover the aquarium with adults and also when it is closed to the public. It has been a treat and I have seen so much more than in past visits. I will also view the eels in a different light after this project. That being said, I also love exploring with the students and my children, family and friends.

    Question 2: I have been using internet streaming into the classroom which has been a great treat and easy to use. I’ve never had the opportunity to do this in my previous classes so it has been a highlight to search the KQED and California Academy of Science website and find information for research, clips and videos to show the students. Working with PreK, Kindergarten, First, Second and Third grade classes each week can be a juggling act, but using the internet to stream in video for even a few minutes has been both educational as well as entertaining for the students. I think every teacher should have at least a laptop with internet connection connected to an ELMO in the class. I am amazed how much information one can share with a class using these tools.

    • Estrella

      A picture is worth a thousand words. Re the Flip Camera, a moving picture is worth a million words. The name Flip Camera sounds so friendly and somewhat like it could be a toy – perfect for nontechnological people like me. But it made the most beautiful moving images. I kind of felt like we were making a real movie – you know, like in Hollywood! I agree with Evelyn that the I Notice and I Wonder sentences sharpens the senses and helps with focus. My class has had some wonderful, quiet, calm I Notice and I Wonder reflections. I appreciated Patty’s comments because I’m on our school’s gardening committee. Re your question about class management, my class becomes quite a bit easier to manage and remain a little quieter when there is an object, toy or prop that they want a turn at — and the flip camera is something that they would really want to play/learn with.

    • Peggy

      I agree with Karen. A big thank to Nancy, Sarah, and Helena (KQED and California Academy of Science) for providing teachers a learning opportunity to integrate Flip Camera into our classroom. Frankly, I am more excited to teach science after attending the training. I feel learning science does not have to be limited only in the classroom; now with the used of Flip Camera or any technology, students can take their learning into another level. In another words, students can collaborate, discuss ideas, and finding possible solution together with the use of technology.

  • Karen

    This program has been a great learning experience. I’m so glad I can now create a movie with the Flip camera. A big thank you to Nancy, Sarah and Helena for providing this opportunity. I will definitely use the many websites and skills teaching science to the elementary school students.

    Question 1: The most interesting observation I’ve made during my visits to the aquarium is how nice it is to not have my own children or students with me when visiting the aquarium. I’ve been to the aquarium several times and have been a member, but I am always there with a class or two or my children. It is a nice break to be able to look around and discover the aquarium with adults and also when it is closed to the public. It has been a treat and I have seen so much more than in past visits. I will also view the eels in a different light after this project. That being said, I also love exploring with the students and my children, family and friends.

    Question 2: I have been using internet streaming into the classroom which has been a great treat and easy to use. I’ve never had the opportunity to do this in my previous classes so it has been a highlight to search the KQED and California Academy of Science website and find information for research, clips and videos to show the students. Working with PreK, Kindergarten, First, Second and Third grade classes each week can be a juggling act, but using the internet to stream in video for even a few minutes has been both educational as well as entertaining for the students. I think every teacher should have at least a laptop with internet connection connected to an ELMO in the class. I am amazed how much information one can share with a class using these tools.

    • Estrella

      A picture is worth a thousand words. Re the Flip Camera, a moving picture is worth a million words. The name Flip Camera sounds so friendly and somewhat like it could be a toy – perfect for nontechnological people like me. But it made the most beautiful moving images. I kind of felt like we were making a real movie – you know, like in Hollywood! I agree with Evelyn that the I Notice and I Wonder sentences sharpens the senses and helps with focus. My class has had some wonderful, quiet, calm I Notice and I Wonder reflections. I appreciated Patty’s comments because I’m on our school’s gardening committee. Re your question about class management, my class becomes quite a bit easier to manage and remain a little quieter when there is an object, toy or prop that they want a turn at — and the flip camera is something that they would really want to play/learn with.

    • Peggy

      I agree with Karen. A big thank to Nancy, Sarah, and Helena (KQED and California Academy of Science) for providing teachers a learning opportunity to integrate Flip Camera into our classroom. Frankly, I am more excited to teach science after attending the training. I feel learning science does not have to be limited only in the classroom; now with the used of Flip Camera or any technology, students can take their learning into another level. In another words, students can collaborate, discuss ideas, and finding possible solution together with the use of technology.

  • Amanda Smith

    An opportunity to explore the California Academy of Science after-hours and develop your own observational study on an animal of your choice, what self-respecting teacher or curious learner wouldn’t love it? The combination of learning an inquiry-based approach to teaching science with the use of technology was an invaluable learning experience as an elementary educator. The flip cams are easy to use, and instantly offer valuable observations of your students to use as assessments, projects, and information for follow-up lessons. I have used the flip cam in my class to record students’ discussions, record reading assessments to show parents at conferences, have students record observations, and to share my own research/observations with my students. The students are motivated by the opportunity to see themselves and their peers ‘on the big screen’ and are able to reflect on their own learning as well as the observations of their classmates, thus improving academic language, content knowledge and discussion skills as a learning community. I enjoyed this process both as a learner and as a teacher.

  • Amanda Smith

    An opportunity to explore the California Academy of Science after-hours and develop your own observational study on an animal of your choice, what self-respecting teacher or curious learner wouldn’t love it? The combination of learning an inquiry-based approach to teaching science with the use of technology was an invaluable learning experience as an elementary educator. The flip cams are easy to use, and instantly offer valuable observations of your students to use as assessments, projects, and information for follow-up lessons. I have used the flip cam in my class to record students’ discussions, record reading assessments to show parents at conferences, have students record observations, and to share my own research/observations with my students. The students are motivated by the opportunity to see themselves and their peers ‘on the big screen’ and are able to reflect on their own learning as well as the observations of their classmates, thus improving academic language, content knowledge and discussion skills as a learning community. I enjoyed this process both as a learner and as a teacher.

  • hsa

    Science Lab has been a wonderful experience for me. I love learning new ideas of integrating of science and media. The “I wonder…” and “I notice…” inquiry prompts are fabulous. My students and I wondered and noticed various things during our class science lessons and during our field trips to the SF Zoo and McLaren Park. I used the Flip to video the students saying their “I wonder” and “I noticed” comments as we were waiting for the bus, walking to our destination, and asking the docents their questions. Because I will be receiving a Flip at the end of the project, I will continue using this form of media in my classroom. The Flip is very easy for my 2nd graders to use. I’m lucky to have a SmartBoard in my classroom so the kids have been able to see themselves on the “big screen.” The California Academy of Sciences and KQED has given me so many resources to teach more science and media in the classroom. Because of the Science Lab, I’m very interested to learning more about science and media. I’m excited for my next KQED class, Digital Storytelling. Thanks!

  • hsa

    Science Lab has been a wonderful experience for me. I love learning new ideas of integrating of science and media. The “I wonder…” and “I notice…” inquiry prompts are fabulous. My students and I wondered and noticed various things during our class science lessons and during our field trips to the SF Zoo and McLaren Park. I used the Flip to video the students saying their “I wonder” and “I noticed” comments as we were waiting for the bus, walking to our destination, and asking the docents their questions. Because I will be receiving a Flip at the end of the project, I will continue using this form of media in my classroom. The Flip is very easy for my 2nd graders to use. I’m lucky to have a SmartBoard in my classroom so the kids have been able to see themselves on the “big screen.” The California Academy of Sciences and KQED has given me so many resources to teach more science and media in the classroom. Because of the Science Lab, I’m very interested to learning more about science and media. I’m excited for my next KQED class, Digital Storytelling. Thanks!

  • Lisa Franks

    I, too, am grateful for this learning opportunity with Science Lab. The introduction to the inquiry process and the use of digital media will grow in my teaching and in my students’ learning. All of our instructors have been so patient and generous!
    So far, with the camera, I have recorded the class experimenting with paper helicopters, their responses to observing an air/water pressure launcher, their dance class, and some partner collaboration during literacy centers. I have yet to edit it all and show it to them. After getting help from Nancy on our final project, I feel more confident that I can do this. And, I have yet to have them do the filming themselves. That is next!
    I have used “I notice, I wonder” in many ways, including the launcher, rainforest images, observing a mural in the hall, and word families on the board!
    Once I resolved my problem accessing the website, I found pbslearningmedia to be a great resource. So far, I showed rainforest images, and asked them to notice and wonder. Next, I will show a video of the Kratt brothers studying the rainforest. I plan to use some segments with and without sound, and have them share their responses through structured talk and drawing. A mural is in the works.
    I read four articles on the Mindshift site, and each one enticed me to go to another link. Here is my response to one of them:
    January 11, 2012 | 9:26 AM | By Tina Barseghian
    “Shifting the Classroom, One Step at a Time”
    FILED UNDER: Culture, inquiry learning, Shelley Wright, Technology in Schools

    I agree that the inquiry process has an emotional component which is integral to the learning. We face frustrations – and delights. We share commonalities – and take our own paths. We accept responsibility for our learning, or we don’t — at any given time. The emotional aspect helps us connect to our learning, and to others.
    As an experienced teacher who has recently returned to the classroom in grade one, I am constantly reflecting, and learning how to engage my students. I agree with Ailine, in this blog, that it is important to ask learners to tell you about their learning — what did they notice, what do they wonder, what did they discover, what will they try next, and thinking about why something has occurred. The potential for language development and thinking skills is huge.
    I am challenged to find time and ways to incorporate this type of inquiry process within the great pageant of all that we do in the course of a week, but I am committed to doing it more. I looked at Kathy Cassidy’s website, referenced in this blog, and plan to use her idea for Oreo stacking. We will extend our skills in number sense, estimation, graphing and critical thinking. Maybe I will assign some students to help document the experience with my Flip camera! Hmm… maybe I will invite our 5th grade buddies to help.
    Thank you for stimulating my professional growth!
    Thank you, Nancy, Helena, Sarah and Science Lab classmates! Upward and onward!

  • Lisa Franks

    I, too, am grateful for this learning opportunity with Science Lab. The introduction to the inquiry process and the use of digital media will grow in my teaching and in my students’ learning. All of our instructors have been so patient and generous!
    So far, with the camera, I have recorded the class experimenting with paper helicopters, their responses to observing an air/water pressure launcher, their dance class, and some partner collaboration during literacy centers. I have yet to edit it all and show it to them. After getting help from Nancy on our final project, I feel more confident that I can do this. And, I have yet to have them do the filming themselves. That is next!
    I have used “I notice, I wonder” in many ways, including the launcher, rainforest images, observing a mural in the hall, and word families on the board!
    Once I resolved my problem accessing the website, I found pbslearningmedia to be a great resource. So far, I showed rainforest images, and asked them to notice and wonder. Next, I will show a video of the Kratt brothers studying the rainforest. I plan to use some segments with and without sound, and have them share their responses through structured talk and drawing. A mural is in the works.
    I read four articles on the Mindshift site, and each one enticed me to go to another link. Here is my response to one of them:
    January 11, 2012 | 9:26 AM | By Tina Barseghian
    “Shifting the Classroom, One Step at a Time”
    FILED UNDER: Culture, inquiry learning, Shelley Wright, Technology in Schools

    I agree that the inquiry process has an emotional component which is integral to the learning. We face frustrations – and delights. We share commonalities – and take our own paths. We accept responsibility for our learning, or we don’t — at any given time. The emotional aspect helps us connect to our learning, and to others.
    As an experienced teacher who has recently returned to the classroom in grade one, I am constantly reflecting, and learning how to engage my students. I agree with Ailine, in this blog, that it is important to ask learners to tell you about their learning — what did they notice, what do they wonder, what did they discover, what will they try next, and thinking about why something has occurred. The potential for language development and thinking skills is huge.
    I am challenged to find time and ways to incorporate this type of inquiry process within the great pageant of all that we do in the course of a week, but I am committed to doing it more. I looked at Kathy Cassidy’s website, referenced in this blog, and plan to use her idea for Oreo stacking. We will extend our skills in number sense, estimation, graphing and critical thinking. Maybe I will assign some students to help document the experience with my Flip camera! Hmm… maybe I will invite our 5th grade buddies to help.
    Thank you for stimulating my professional growth!
    Thank you, Nancy, Helena, Sarah and Science Lab classmates! Upward and onward!

  • patrick dyer

    I have to say that I am really glad that I have been exposed to all the rich resources online at my disposal to teach science. It is incredible the resources that PBS and KQED have that suppliment the textbook. For example, my students were reading the tale Amos and Boris about a whale and mouse that become friends. Using the KQED and PBS website resources I showed my students live videos of whales in the ocean along with finding an interactive map to trace the two friends journey. It is amazing how hands-on and engaging a lesson can be using the computer and KQED has made such a useful tool for educators!

  • patrick dyer

    I have to say that I am really glad that I have been exposed to all the rich resources online at my disposal to teach science. It is incredible the resources that PBS and KQED have that suppliment the textbook. For example, my students were reading the tale Amos and Boris about a whale and mouse that become friends. Using the KQED and PBS website resources I showed my students live videos of whales in the ocean along with finding an interactive map to trace the two friends journey. It is amazing how hands-on and engaging a lesson can be using the computer and KQED has made such a useful tool for educators!