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Do Now #3: California Dream

| September 23, 2011 | 4 Comments
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Do Now

How would you feel if you got into college, but couldn’t receive funding to go?

Intro

The California Dream Act is a pair of bills signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown in 2011: Assembly Bill 130 and Assembly Bill 131, both authored by Assemblymember Gil Cedillo (D-LA).

AB 130 allows undocumented students to receive scholarships/financial assistance that comes from non-state sources (private funds, etc).  AB 131 allows these same students to be eligible for state funded financial assistance — including Cal Grants, community college fee waivers, and campus-specific grants/loan programs.

Expanding the aid eligibility of students who graduated from California high schools but are not legal U.S. residents has been hotly debated in the state Capitol for several years.  Earlier efforts, while approved by the California Legislature, were vetoed by former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

The bills apply to any student who has attended a California high school for at least three years and graduated or earned a GED in California. “The California State University estimated that some of the 3,600 students who have permission to pay in-state tuition rates even though they lack legal documentation could be affected by the new law. The CSU system enrolls about 440,000 students.” KQED News Fix

Governor Brown signed AB 130 into law, part of the California Dream Act, and it will take effect on January 1, 2012. To hear more about this legislation, listen to the KQED News story below.

Resource

KQED News Gov. Brown Considers California Dream Act
Governor Jerry Brown already signed the first half of the so-called California Dream Act. Brown will now have to decide whether the state can afford the second half.


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDedspace and end it with #KQEDDoNow

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.


More Resources for Follow-up Lessons

KQED News Fix post California “Dream Act” Moves to Brown’s Desk
July 14, 2011, 3:45 pm • Posted by Jon Brooks

KQED Forum segment with Jose Antonio Vargas
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas made headlines around the world last month when he revealed in a New York Times Magazine article that he is an undocumented immigrant. The Mountain View-raised Vargas joins us to discuss the public response to his admission, and to talk about his new campaign “to elevate the conversation around immigration.”

KQED Forum segment on Jerry Brown and Latinos
Governor Jerry Brown signed the first part of the Dream Act yesterday, which would give undocumented college students at California universities access to privately funded financial aid. The decision follows Brown’s June veto of legislation that would have made it easier for farm workers to unionize. We look at Governor Brown’s political relationship with the Latino community in California.

NOTE: This legislative package differs from the federal Dream Act, which would include a path to citizenship for those children who came to America originally as undocumented immigrants.

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Category: Do Now, PBS LM Social Studies/Lang. Arts, Post-Secondary ESL

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About the Author ()

Maxine Einhorn is from London and has lived in the Bay Area for 12 years. She has worked in adult education in London,UK, for over twenty years as a tenured instructor and department manager. She has an MA in Film and TV from University of London and has taught, moderated and appraised academic work in film studies and media literacy at undergraduate and college level. She runs the ESL/ Post Secondary project at KQED which offers media-rich resources for and created by ESL educators.
  • Jenna

    Two mistakes I immedately noticed, which made me stop reading your article.

    1. The California Dream Act is a 2011 bill, not a 2010 bill. AB 131 was introduced on January 11, 2011 and was passed on October 8, 2011. AB 130 was introduced on the same day but passed on July 25, 2011.

    2. It is NOT A STATE SENATE BILL!!! AB stands for Assembly Bill. Hence the AB, not SB.

    Dear writer, this is your INTRO sentence and you’ve already got things wrong!!

    “This is the only way they could afford to go to college.” This is opinion. Not fact. This merely aids undocumented student into going to college.

    “AB 131, would open the state-funded financial aid program Cal Grants to these students.” Partly true. They get MORE than just Cal Grants.

    If you are going to write on the facts, at least have your facts right.

    • Maxine Einhorn

      Hi Jenna – Thank you for your comment and corrections. This is a complex issue which I was trying to simplify for our target audience – middle and high school students. In trying to summarize the history, my post was unclear. Your clarifications are helpful and I hope you will continue to follow the blog and contribute to it.

  • Jenna

    Two mistakes I immedately noticed, which made me stop reading your article.

    1. The California Dream Act is a 2011 bill, not a 2010 bill. AB 131 was introduced on January 11, 2011 and was passed on October 8, 2011. AB 130 was introduced on the same day but passed on July 25, 2011.

    2. It is NOT A STATE SENATE BILL!!! AB stands for Assembly Bill. Hence the AB, not SB.

    Dear writer, this is your INTRO sentence and you’ve already got things wrong!!

    “This is the only way they could afford to go to college.” This is opinion. Not fact. This merely aids undocumented student into going to college.

    “AB 131, would open the state-funded financial aid program Cal Grants to these students.” Partly true. They get MORE than just Cal Grants.

    If you are going to write on the facts, at least have your facts right.

    • Maxine Einhorn

      Hi Jenna – Thank you for your comment and corrections. This is a complex issue which I was trying to simplify for our target audience – middle and high school students. In trying to summarize the history, my post was unclear. Your clarifications are helpful and I hope you will continue to follow the blog and contribute to it.