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Science Lab – Summer 2011

| August 10, 2011 | 4 Comments
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Hello educators,

Welcome to the 2011 summer session of KQED Science Lab!

Science Lab is a new program of KQED Education designed to help K-5 teachers integrate media and technology in the classroom to enrich teaching and learning of science.

We’ll introduce you to countless free online PBS and KQED educational media resources connecting you and your students to various topics in life, physical, and earth sciences. You’ll also experience what it’s like to edit your own raw video into a short educational movie. With a Flip camcorder in hand, you’ll see how taking video of your students and capturing their learning process will help you to connect with them and support their education. Video is also a great way to reflect and improve on your own teaching practice.

Hilary Dito, STEM coordinator of Contra Costa County Office of Education, and I will guide you through this course. We’re excited to get started. Please use this blog to post comments, questions, and refer to video tutorials.

Flip Video Tutorial

Below, is a four part video educast series on how to use FlipShare, the video editing program that comes with the Flip Camera. Each section will take you through a particular part of the process. Part 1 is a general overview of the application’s interface along with an explanation of how to download the software from the camera to your computer. Part 2 covers how to save a video from the camera to your computer. Part 3 explains how to make simple trims or edits to a single video. And finally, part 4 overviews how to compile more than one video to create a movie with text and music. To navigate through the four videos, you have to click on the icon on the bottom of the frame that looks like a TV monitor — it is located to the left of the plus sign (+).

Pre Survey: Before we get started today, please complete this survey. You’ll take another survey on the last day of this course.

Post Survey: Before you leave today, please complete this post-survey. We’ll compare the data from the pre and post survey and review the overall impact of these trainings. Check back at this blog to find the results!

Day 1: Fifteen K-3 educators from West Contra Costa Unified School District discovered using a Flip camcorder and editing videos into a movie wasn’t as hard as it first seemed. After three hours of training at KQED, participants of Science Lab were pleased to produce a one-two minute video. Gaining confidence to use and create video to enhance teaching and learning can be a time-consuming process but a journey many teachers are willing to take. Martha, a participant, admits, “I felt frustrated. It was challenging for me. But I’m now looking forward to learning as much as I can from this Science Lab workshop.”

Day 2 was spent exploring two different hands-on approaches to teaching science and comparing their benefits. Using Exploratorium’s Institute of Inquiry workshop titled Comparing Approaches to Hands-On Science, Hilary Dito, STEM coordinator of Contra Costa County Office of Education, led the group to investigate the structure and behavior of spinning tops. Hilary explains her views on teaching science in the elementary grades.
“Engaging students in science is essential to produce critical thinkers, scientific-literate citizens and our next generation of scientists and engineers. Inquiry lessons provide engagement while developing students’ abilities to solve problems, use tools and think creatively. Inquiry lessons also give students the opportunity to explore their questions and learn topics at a deeper level. By exploring three different approaches to hands-on science, teachers understand the value of different approaches to teaching and learning and can thoughtfully address the needs of their students throughout the learning process.”

Day 3 involved combining the skills learned in the past two sessions. Teachers learned a third approach where the exploration and questioning process were open-ended, depending upon individual interest. Teachers created their own “explorable” question and fashioned their own spinning tops to find answers. Meanwhile, each person had to document his or her learning using the Flip camcorder. Teachers will edit their footage into a ‘must-see’ video on Day 4. Stay tuned!

Here are the finished videos. There are 12 of them. To navigate through them, you have to click on the icon on the bottom of the frame that looks like a TV monitor — it is located to the left of the plus sign (+).

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Category: K-5 Science, Teacher Trainings

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  • Karen

    I’m having trouble installing the flipshare on my mac. i’m running a mac os x version 10.7.2 and the window flipshare cannot load the 3ivx video decoder. please reinstall 3ivx. pops up. i’ve installed it 3 times. any suggestions? thanks.

    • Karen

      there is also a window that reads you can’t ope the application cpmac because power pc applications are no longer supported.

  • Karen

    I’m having trouble installing the flipshare on my mac. i’m running a mac os x version 10.7.2 and the window flipshare cannot load the 3ivx video decoder. please reinstall 3ivx. pops up. i’ve installed it 3 times. any suggestions? thanks.

    • Karen

      there is also a window that reads you can’t ope the application cpmac because power pc applications are no longer supported.