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Digital Self-Portraits Workshop 1.2: Great body of work!

| July 1, 2011 | 6 Comments
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Sharon

Hi everyone,

I’m back from my trip to Philadelphia where I attended the ISTE conference — a lot of educational technology stuff. It was really interesting, but I have to say that I kept thinking about the work you are all doing in this workshop and how impressive it is! Some of your stories are so powerful and honest and I really appreciate all of your courage to go “there” for this workshop. It has made it so meaningful.

So technically, our work is not finished. Some of you still want to complete your films — finesse them and so forth. I would like to give you time to do this, but do not want to prolong it and lose momentum. Can everyone please promise to be finished with your films by Friday, July 8? I would want everyone to upload their films to YouTube as well as send me a digital copy of it.

If you need guidance on how to export your movie and upload it on YouTube, I can be of help. Please email if you need help.

Also, I would like you to now take the time and reflect on the work we did in class. Please think about what you learned, what you still need to work on, the process you went through in making your film, and how you would ultimately frame this project with your students. So, in short, I’m asking you to respond to this question and comment in the comments section below: How would you use digital self-portraits in your class? What other learning objectives could it connect to? What would be the challenges? What value would it add to your students’ learning?

From this point, Kristin and I will help you get your project on its feet in the Fall. We will follow through with you so that perhaps, we can present our work at the ISTE Conference next Summer in San Diego!

Thanks again for your great work and dedication!
Matt

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Category: Arts, Teacher Trainings, Teacher Trainings for Arts

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About the Author ()

Matthew Williams is a filmmaker and media educator who has recently transplanted to Oakland from Los Angeles. He believes that you are what you eat and feels everyone should have a multitude of dietary options for self-realization. Matthew is the Educational Technologist at KQED.
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15333035476464650737 Mr. Curry’s Class

    Greetings from Chicago,I see my project as a first effort and I will be creating a more focused mOde for my students which gives them a chance to use primary sources and interviews to document their family's migration / immigration to the Bay AreaMost are 1st or 2nd generation in America but a few may have harder to trace family roots fromEurope and Africa The challenge will be enough computers, cameras and time. I teach 5 sections of 8th grade US History

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15333035476464650737 Mr. Curry’s Class

    Greetings from Chicago,I see my project as a first effort and I will be creating a more focused mOde for my students which gives them a chance to use primary sources and interviews to document their family's migration / immigration to the Bay AreaMost are 1st or 2nd generation in America but a few may have harder to trace family roots fromEurope and Africa The challenge will be enough computers, cameras and time. I teach 5 sections of 8th grade US History

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11308165215739542487 SanJoRita

    I had two goals when signing up for the video class last April. First, my original intent in taking the class was to introduce a new media for a project-based religious studies class called Women, Creativity and Spirituality. I have since realized that I will not be teaching the class next year. I remain happy to have learned enough to offer the option of making a video to students in any of the classes I teach. Second, I was curious how difficult it is to make a short video as some students have submitted movies for mid-term and final assessment grades. There have been varying degrees of success to students’ demonstration of a rich grasp of class content. How difficult, how easy would this be to do?Turns out to be quite difficult. So many skills – writing, filming, finding soundtrack, editing- are involved to make a good movie. I have a sharper sense of distinction between being a consumer of media versus being a producer. Every teacher ought to appreciate this distinction as many students swim in all sorts of media. “Social” media is just one type, but all media demands critical thinking for best educational value. I have new appreciation of the potential for social media to be the conjunction of both the consuming and producing roles with a chance to keep the roles in balance.Overall, I conclude that the self-portrait video class has added value to my teaching across the board and given me insight into student learning process. The greatest challenge to requiring a video product is time. There is precious little in the class period to teach the process on school hardware during class time. I offer two alternative, cost-free sources for giving an assignment requiring creative manipulation of image and sound like video construction does. Students, not universally, have liked both these programs. The first is a program from Animoto.com @ http://animoto.com/pricing . Scroll all the way to bottom of this page and click on “Animoto for…Education” in lower left area. Follow the prompts and as an educator, you can get 6 month access for up to 50 videos. Access can easily be renewed. Under an educator account, content can be kept private. The second site is also free but more tricky / frustrating to fully exploit with mult-media content. If you think you would like “powerpoint on steroids”, then Prezi is for you @ http://prezi.com/#prezi . Anyone can sign up for an account and products can be shared via emailed links or embedding code. Product can be restricted but I do not remember how to do that. There are lots of help links. If you have read this far and have similar resources to share, please do so!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/11308165215739542487 SanJoRita

    I had two goals when signing up for the video class last April. First, my original intent in taking the class was to introduce a new media for a project-based religious studies class called Women, Creativity and Spirituality. I have since realized that I will not be teaching the class next year. I remain happy to have learned enough to offer the option of making a video to students in any of the classes I teach. Second, I was curious how difficult it is to make a short video as some students have submitted movies for mid-term and final assessment grades. There have been varying degrees of success to students’ demonstration of a rich grasp of class content. How difficult, how easy would this be to do?Turns out to be quite difficult. So many skills – writing, filming, finding soundtrack, editing- are involved to make a good movie. I have a sharper sense of distinction between being a consumer of media versus being a producer. Every teacher ought to appreciate this distinction as many students swim in all sorts of media. “Social” media is just one type, but all media demands critical thinking for best educational value. I have new appreciation of the potential for social media to be the conjunction of both the consuming and producing roles with a chance to keep the roles in balance.Overall, I conclude that the self-portrait video class has added value to my teaching across the board and given me insight into student learning process. The greatest challenge to requiring a video product is time. There is precious little in the class period to teach the process on school hardware during class time. I offer two alternative, cost-free sources for giving an assignment requiring creative manipulation of image and sound like video construction does. Students, not universally, have liked both these programs. The first is a program from Animoto.com @ http://animoto.com/pricing . Scroll all the way to bottom of this page and click on “Animoto for…Education” in lower left area. Follow the prompts and as an educator, you can get 6 month access for up to 50 videos. Access can easily be renewed. Under an educator account, content can be kept private. The second site is also free but more tricky / frustrating to fully exploit with mult-media content. If you think you would like “powerpoint on steroids”, then Prezi is for you @ http://prezi.com/#prezi . Anyone can sign up for an account and products can be shared via emailed links or embedding code. Product can be restricted but I do not remember how to do that. There are lots of help links. If you have read this far and have similar resources to share, please do so!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05589712885749541522 pangloss

    Hi Matt:This has turned out to be even more difficult than I originally expected. I ended up getting sidetracked several times by everything from technical to emotional issues. And of course, Life intervened a few times, to keep things even more interesting.However, I am going to attempt to get a rough cut of some sort on YouTube for tomorrow. Not all the components that I wanted will be there, but perhaps that's just as well.As to your prompts, I am currently thinking that this would be doable with some older, but disabled folks that I work with. I tried working with two recently, but because I was also showing them how to use the computer, the going was very slow. They got hung up in the technical details, where I wished that they had just spun out their stories. They might not be interested in the technical stuff, but they might be in the process of getting the stories and storyboarding or editing the script, that sort of thing.In the various schools I work in, usually one or more of the components are missing. That means I would have to bring some of my own and do a lot of the work for them, rather than them doing it all themselves. Nonetheless, if I can figure out the logistics for this, it could be an awesome project that I know most of the kids would enjoy.I haven't tried Prezi yet, but I know you can embed videos in Powerpoint, etc. So that could be another use for it.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05589712885749541522 pangloss

    Hi Matt:This has turned out to be even more difficult than I originally expected. I ended up getting sidetracked several times by everything from technical to emotional issues. And of course, Life intervened a few times, to keep things even more interesting.However, I am going to attempt to get a rough cut of some sort on YouTube for tomorrow. Not all the components that I wanted will be there, but perhaps that's just as well.As to your prompts, I am currently thinking that this would be doable with some older, but disabled folks that I work with. I tried working with two recently, but because I was also showing them how to use the computer, the going was very slow. They got hung up in the technical details, where I wished that they had just spun out their stories. They might not be interested in the technical stuff, but they might be in the process of getting the stories and storyboarding or editing the script, that sort of thing.In the various schools I work in, usually one or more of the components are missing. That means I would have to bring some of my own and do a lot of the work for them, rather than them doing it all themselves. Nonetheless, if I can figure out the logistics for this, it could be an awesome project that I know most of the kids would enjoy.I haven't tried Prezi yet, but I know you can embed videos in Powerpoint, etc. So that could be another use for it.