Check, Please! Bay Area: Season 2: Episode 10 (210)

Check, Please! Bay Area’s second season episode 10 (210) profiles and reviews these three Bay Area restaurants:

1) Pear Street Bistro: | restaurant information | reviews |

2) Sociale: | restaurant information | reviews | recipe |

3) Presidio Bowling Center Grill: | restaurant information | reviews |

WATCH EPISODE ONLINE

Other ways to watch episode online (and on video iPod):
Stream episode (requires RealPlayer: windows | mac)
Download episode (requires iTunes or QuickTime)
Subscribe to Video Podcast

View photo gallery (flickr.com)

Leslie SbroccoMy name is Leslie Sbrocco and I’m the host of Check, Please! Bay Area. Each week, I will be sharing my tasting notes about the wine the guests and I drank on set during the taping of the show. Also, in my “What to Sip” suggestions, I choose one restaurant from each show and offer tips for selecting libations to enjoy with your meal.


Wine of the Week:

2004 Te Kairanga, Pinot Noir, Martinborough, New Zealand $18
One of the hottest spots these days for world-class wine is New Zealand. Known for its signature white, Sauvignon Blanc, it’s also the place to look for exciting red wines made from Pinot Noir grapes. A tremendous value (hey, under $20 is a steal for Pinot Noir), the Te Kairanga hails from the historic region of Martinborough on New Zealand’s North Island. Dusty, earthy aromas mix it up with dark cherry fruit and silky texture. Delicious.

What to Sip: Sociale

Sociale is the sort of spot you’d stumble upon wandering the Italian countryside. Hearty yet chic food is complemented by a well-chosen wine list. Kick off your meal with a bottle of northern Italian sparkling wine named Ca’del Bosco Franciacorta ($60). Zesty and complex, this is fun fizz. After a bit of bubbly, it’s time to explore the hidden vinous treasures on the uniquely-organized wine list. For something “sottile ma sostanzioso” (subtle but substantial), try the elegant white, Pieropan Soave Classico ($51). You can select “rotondo e robusto” (round and robust) wines or “corragioso e competitivo” (courageous and competitive) reds, including a well-priced powerhouse southern Italian red named Le Querce Aglianico del Vulture ($30).

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  • Tony Daysog

    I don’t like to watch your show because, invariably, one of the guests makes such a negative comment about another guest’s restaurant and food choices in a way that seems excessive and personal. I find that kind of commentary very off-putting, especially because every one of your guests are amatures — so there’s no reason whatsoever for one guest to act so hoity-toity over another. Often times, it not “what” these negative guests say, but it’s “how” they say it that, to me, is so off-putting. I think everybody goes into this show with the best of intentions — to tell about their favorite restaurant. I think your guests should respect the choices and decisions of others, and where differences occur, work hard to do so ina way that seem professional and less judgemental of the other guest as a person. If you don’t already, I really think you should require each of your guests to undergo some kind thirty minute or one hour primer on what constitutes good and proper communication before allowing anyoen one minute on the air via KQED. By the way, that negative exhange I am writing about occured this past week again, where the lady in black (Charlene) through language and intonation made the blonde lady (Alexandra) seem like a ditz for choosing her restaurant (Trattoria Siciliano). I dont know either person or have no connection with any restaurants — I am just a TV viewer and, week in and week out, because she likes to watch “Check Please”, I’ve been telling my girlfriend about what I’ve been noticing taking place on your show with respect to communication style, and how off-putting this is to me. Anyways . .. that’s my two cents that I’ve been itching to relay to you guys.