Archive for March, 2009

Burmese Food & Tiki Drinks

Burmese Food & Tiki Drinks

| March 31, 2009 | 2 Comments

Last night, I took a quick cab ride home from Bourbon and Branch, where I had gone to have a drink from the amazing Martin Cate. Cate was the genius behind Forbidden Island in Alameda until a few months ago. He is fighting the good fight — keeping the tradition of impeccably executed Tiki drinks alive.

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Scrambling Spring Eggs

Scrambling Spring Eggs

| March 30, 2009 | 0 Comments

Once upon a time, hens took a break during the winter, waiting for the arrival of longer, warmers days to lay their eggs and hatch their chicks. Although we’ve entrapped them in an endless summer of egg production, it’s good to stop occasionally and remember that so many basic foods, especially the ones we take for granted, are still wonders of nature.

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Eat Me, David, and Ezra: Web Crushes

Eat Me, David, and Ezra: Web Crushes

| March 27, 2009 | 2 Comments

I spend entirely too much time on the Internet. Sometimes I’m working, sometimes I go into a Facebook Scramble trance, and other times, I am taking a look at what other food bloggers are doing.

There are, for better or for worse, a dizzying amount of food blogs out there. And most of them are, frankly, crap unappetizing. The sinister flash photography, the “look-what-I-had-for-dinner” sharing, the heavy reliance on the exclamation point, the word “yummy” or the suffix “-icious.” It’s enough make me show you what-I-had-for-dinner. After I have eaten it.

And don’t get me started on the number of cupcake blogs out there or I shall cry.

Fortunately, there are a few places of refuge: sites that sparkle like the Emerald City set against the background of a sky blackened by millions of flying, food blogging monkeys.

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Homemade Focaccia

Homemade Focaccia

| March 26, 2009 | 1 Comment

One bread I love to make at home is focaccia. In addition to thinking it’s one of the easier breads to bake, I also love that it can accommodate a variety of toppings. Although it is most often baked with sea salt and rosemary, you can easily add thyme or sage instead, not to mention goat cheese, caramelized onions, olives, garlic, nuts, anchovies, and fresh tomatoes.

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Pickles: Slayer of Hangovers

Pickles: Slayer of Hangovers

| March 25, 2009 | 0 Comments

From the sundrenched views of the brand spankin’ new enclosed heated patio, it looks like Pickles is settling in nicely after reopening about a month ago.

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Cutting food costs while eating sustainably: What’s your advice?

Cutting food costs while eating sustainably: What’s your advice?

| March 24, 2009 | 3 Comments

I am sure I am not alone in examining all parts of my budget during this time of economic strife. (In fact, this post was late because I am in the midst of epic research on how to cut down my phone bill.)
Since I believe so strongly in buying good, sustainably raised food from local purveyors, it can sometimes be a challenge to reign in spending.

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Local Wine Shops

Local Wine Shops

| March 23, 2009 | 5 Comments

So I’m writing today about wine shops, and what I look for in them, now, as a customer. And I hope you’ll send in comments naming your favorite wine shops, or warehouses, and why you like them.

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Recipe: B is for Beet

Recipe: B is for Beet

So, the Obamas are planting that organic edible garden on the grounds of the White House after all. It looks like a lovely melting-pot of flavors and cultures, too, with tomatillos and Thai basil, chiles and cilantro, chard and arugula.

But where’s the beet?

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Crab Rangoon: Something from Something Else.

Crab Rangoon: Something from Something Else.

| March 20, 2009 | 6 Comments

Last week, I accepted a dinner invitation from an ex-boyfriend to dine with two old, out-of-town friends at Bar Crudo. It would seem that I can be lured nearly anywhere by the promise of raw shellfish and wine.

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Bragiole for Saint Paddy’s Day

Bragiole for Saint Paddy’s Day

| March 19, 2009 | 3 Comments

So in honor of my father and grandmother, I made Italian gravy this week. I still can’t tell you how my family makes this dish, although I will tell you how I made the bragiole, using my grandmother’s method for sharing a recipe.

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Afghan Bread in Fremont’s Little Kabul

Afghan Bread in Fremont’s Little Kabul

| March 18, 2009 | 8 Comments

With winter’s pantry almost empty and the green promise of Persian New Year just days away, it was time for a trip to Fremont’s Little Kabul to stock up on Near/Middle/Far Eastern supplies.

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Delicious Beans: Santa Maria Pinquitos

Delicious Beans: Santa Maria Pinquitos

| March 17, 2009 | 0 Comments

On my trip to Sonoma County a few weeks ago, I re-discovered Santa Maria Pinquitos, a small New World bean which is delicious in flavor and creamy in consistency. I was at the Tierra Vegetables farm stand and noticed them in a big bin.

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Foodoro v. Foodzie: Online Marketplaces for Foodies

Foodoro v. Foodzie: Online Marketplaces for Foodies

| March 16, 2009 | 6 Comments

Over the past three months, two companies have emerged on the foodie/techie scene, making it possible for consumers to access artisanal and gourmet goods at the click of a button.
Foodzie, a TechStars startup with a seed round of $1 million raised from noted investor Jeff Clavier of SoftTech VC, First Round Capital, Tim Ferriss, and a number of angel investors, launched in December 2008. Foodoro, a Y Combinator startup, just launched last week. Both companies are based in San Francisco, and both sites offer a variety of specialty food items from producers across the country.

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Urban Homesteading: Patio Potato Farming

Urban Homesteading: Patio Potato Farming

It’s true, I’ll admit it: these are some ugly-looking potatoes. Back in December, though, they were sleek, alluring even, a pound or two of organic fingerlings that came as part of a mystery box of roots, tubers, and greens from Mariquita Farms. Somehow, though, they got muscled to the back of the pantry by the 20 pounds of russets bought for holiday latke-making at the same time. By the time I could even think about eating potatoes again, my taters had only baby-making in mind.

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